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02LimitedX
12-20-2006, 21:29
I am looking into joining the Marine Corps. I am 21 years old and ready for a change. I havent talked to a recruiter yet, but I was wondering if there is anything I should be aware of or ask when I talk with one. I guess I have to take the ASVAB test? Any thing else I should be thinking about? Thanks for the replies!

ret_marine2003
12-21-2006, 01:19
Do you have:

1. H.S. Dip or GED?
2. Any criminal record whatsoever including any incidents that may have occurred as a juvenile?
3. Any outstanding debt?
4. Any physical or mental conditions?
5. Any dependants?

6. What do you do now?

7. What would you like to do in the future?

8. What have you always wanted to do?

What is your height and weight?

Are you fit enough to pass the entry level qualifications?

Are you willing to dedicate yourself to surpassing the minimum qualifications?

Are you willing to follow all orders no matter how senceless they may seem at the time?

Are you capable of learning in a stress environment?

Are you willing to commit to four years of active duty and an additional four years of inactive duty?

bsjones84
12-21-2006, 01:35
I'm 22 right now and joined when I was 21 after spending three years working full time and going to college more than full time. I'm still in MOS training, but I love it. The training is the best you'll find. When talking to a recruiter about enlisting, ask about jobs. You don't want to go in without having locked-on a job. Have the recruiter go over what jobs the Marine Corps offers and what jobs are available. If he tells you that you can get anyone you want, be careful. There are only a certain number of jobs available for each month/quarter (whatever the time period is) and once those are gone it's much harder to lock on the job. Spend some time thinking about what you want to do and then see if it's available. If it isn't available, don't feel bad about waiting. In addition to talking to the recruiter, talk to other Marines that are around the office if you know them. If there are other people who have signed but are waiting to go to boot camp, talk to them also.
Something else to consider is what type of enlistment you want-active or reserve. If you have a bachelors or are a junior in college you might be able to get into PLC and be an officer. If you want to take advantage of the education benefits, talk to the recruiter about what's available. You can get the GI bill, Marine Corps college fund, and while on active duty the Marine Corps offers good tuition assistance. Even if college isn't big on your list, take some classes anyways when you can because it helps for promotions when you start pickin up rank.
As far as it goes for the ASVAB, it's a basic test of knowledge in various subjects. You don't need to study for it or anything; however, if you want to be more prepared there are study/prep materials availalbe. You can usually find them at a library. There's also a "sample" version of the ASVAB. I forget how to get to it, but if you talk to a recruiter, ask him about it and you'll have an idea of how you'll do on the ASVAB.
I don't know your reasons for considering the Marine Corps over other branches, but it's the right decision to make. You'll get better training in the Marine Corps. Other branches might be able to offer money or more jobs because they have a bigger budget for those things, but the training is much better in the Corps. If you do decide to enlist, you won't regret it. If you have any other questions drop a line on my email (bsjones84@hotmail.com). I'd be glad to tell you how things have been for me and what I've learned so far. There are also plenty of other Marines around here who have been in the Corps much longer than me that can tell you more, maybe even a recruiter or two.

Jones

ret_marine2003
12-21-2006, 02:11
Something else to consider is what type of enlistment you want-active or reserve.

If your goal is college consider ROTC or reserve

If you have a bachelors or are a junior in college you might be able to get into PLC and be an officer.

If you want to take advantage of the education benefits, talk to the recruiter about what's available. You can get the GI bill, Marine Corps college fund, and while on active duty the Marine Corps offers good tuition assistance.

You will not get to go to college while on active duty unless you are an administrative duty.

Even if college isn't big on your list, take some classes anyways when you can because it helps for promotions when you start pickin up rank.

MCI's will help your rank and better apply to a new Marine than college classes. MCI's don't cost a thing and are encouraged. In the eyes of most NCO's and officers, college classes take away from mission readiness. The Marine Corps College Fund and Montgomery G.I. Bill have additional requirements attached to them. If you sign up, dont let it be for college money. You may not get what you paid for. Sign up because you feel it is the right thing to do for you, god, contry, and the USMC. ;)

inkslut
12-21-2006, 08:25
Originally posted by ret_marine2003
Do you have:

1. H.S. Dip or GED?
2. Any criminal record whatsoever including any incidents that may have occurred as a juvenile?
3. Any outstanding debt?
4. Any physical or mental conditions?
5. Any dependants?

6. What do you do now?

7. What would you like to do in the future?

8. What have you always wanted to do?

What is your height and weight?

Are you fit enough to pass the entry level qualifications?

Are you willing to dedicate yourself to surpassing the minimum qualifications?

Are you willing to follow all orders no matter how senceless they may seem at the time?

Are you capable of learning in a stress environment?

Are you willing to commit to four years of active duty and an additional four years of inactive duty?

What he said. Now shut down your computer and go enlist!

Marine8541
12-21-2006, 10:59
You really do need to see a recruiter. There are waivers for almost anything if you have problems. The only advice that I'll give is make sure you fully understand what you're getting yourself into and know that the GI bill is a joke. last time I checked it pays a four year benefit of around $36,000 and that isn't anything if you're going to a major school. It's eaiser and better for you to take out low intrest school loans. Other than that do what inkslut said and get moving.

02LimitedX
12-21-2006, 17:56
1. H.S. Dip or GED?
High School Diploma, year and a half college (I hated every minute)

2. Any criminal record whatsoever including any incidents that may have occurred as a juvenile?
Nope, clean slate.

3. Any outstanding debt?
None.

4. Any physical or mental conditions?
No.

5. Any dependants?
No.

6. What do you do now?
Salesman/Rental Dept @ Hardware store

7. What would you like to do in the future?
Not really sure other than the Corps.

8. What have you always wanted to do?
Not really sure here...

What is your height and weight?
5 ft 10 and 160

Are you fit enough to pass the entry level qualifications?
I am sure I am.

Are you willing to dedicate yourself to surpassing the minimum qualifications?
Absolutely.

Are you willing to follow all orders no matter how senceless they may seem at the time?
Yes.

Are you capable of learning in a stress environment?
Yes.

Are you willing to commit to four years of active duty and an additional four years of inactive duty?
Yes. Maybe Career if I enjoy it as much as I think I will.

kingsnake
12-21-2006, 21:56
Ive been out for two years, I did my four and got out The (PFT) is minimum 3 pull ups 20 max, 100 crunches in two minutes and being able to run 3 miles in under 24 minutes?? mine was 27 cause I got the senior sitizens discount anyway I will never forget all the good times or the bad ones OOOHRAA!!

ret_marine2003
12-22-2006, 13:23
Originally posted by 02LimitedX
1. H.S. Dip or GED?
High School Diploma, year and a half college (I hated every minute)

2. Any criminal record whatsoever including any incidents that may have occurred as a juvenile?
Nope, clean slate.

3. Any outstanding debt?
None.

4. Any physical or mental conditions?
No.

5. Any dependants?
No.

6. What do you do now?
Salesman/Rental Dept @ Hardware store

7. What would you like to do in the future?
Not really sure other than the Corps.

8. What have you always wanted to do?
Not really sure here...

What is your height and weight?
5 ft 10 and 160

Are you fit enough to pass the entry level qualifications?
I am sure I am.

Are you willing to dedicate yourself to surpassing the minimum qualifications?
Absolutely.

Are you willing to follow all orders no matter how senseless they may seem at the time?
Yes.

Are you capable of learning in a stress environment?
Yes.

Are you willing to commit to four years of active duty and an additional four years of inactive duty?
Yes. Maybe Career if I enjoy it as much as I think I will.


7. What would you like to do in the future?
Not really sure other than the Corps.

8. What have you always wanted to do?
Not really sure here...

These two answers are your only obstacle if all else is accurate.

You need to have a perception of what you want to be or do in the future to be successful in the USMC or life in general. Young Marines without long term goals rely entirely on the forces of divine intervention and luck. The majority of them do not fare well and do not make a career of it.

If you have never imagined yourself as an astronaut, construction worker, builder, welder, truck driver, doctor, lawyer, etc... as a child or young adult and thought that you would want to be one when you grew up, now is the time to act on it.
Most people carry with them a dream or idea of who they want to be and an image of themselves in that position.

If you always wanted to be a soldier or grunt, that's cool.
But consider something else you have dreamed of being as well.
0311 and related fields are hard on the body. You may only be suitable for an enlistment or two. After that your knees, back, and hearing are effected enough to effect your performance. A skill is good to have when your ride is over.

It is a good thing that I have retired because if I got out young I would be in trouble. There just isn't much of a call for people with an infantry and explosive ordinance background in civilian life, and when people learn that is what you did for twenty plus years, they treat you with a degree of apprehension. :supergrin:

Marine8541
12-22-2006, 16:44
Originally posted by ret_marine2003
[COLOR=red] and when people learn that is what you did for twenty plus years, they treat you with a degree of apprehension. :supergrin:

I spent 20+ in the Infantry side of the house and even my B bills were all related some how to 03 or weapons training and I have never been treated with apprehension of any degree or form. There are many jobs that 03's are qualified for either directly or indirectly and many government jobs offer preferential hiring of Vets. Right now Aurora PD (the second largest city in CO) is looking for PO and is giving preference to Vets and extra points for 03, 08, 21, 23, and 58 fields. I knew guys from the 03 field who became cops, firemen, worked at the DMV, post office, Coors, TSA, city, state county, and fed jobs, and all were had by using their service. You're no more skill challenged when you get out as a 03 as a 35 (motor transport) or 33 (food service) or 43 (pub affairs) or most of the 39 cats of primary MOS. Most Marines parlay the service not the job into civie life.


I had a good friend who joined and became an 11 utilities so he could learn all about refrigaration repair and hygine equiptment and all that. When he got out he quickly found that the equiptment he used in the suck was 25 years behind what civies use and couldn't get a job in that field but he has spent the last 15 years at the county handing out plates , a job he would have never had if he hadn't been a marine. In the end take the field you want not the field you think has the best chance for you to get a civie job.

ret_marine2003
12-23-2006, 04:05
I will have to respectfully disagree with you on this issue citing my personal experience as well as my experience and observations while serving as a veteran's service rep over the past two years.

It took most of my college money to obtain state certification to work L.E.
I work in my field part time and enjoy it, but believe me; employers do treat you with apprehension and if I applied to the current administration in the same department I probably would not be hired for fear of a vet "going postal" or reverting to military tactics during a stress situation.
I was hired by a great man who also did his time (Army and Navy) and retired for a third time a year after I was hired.

(Military experience or not, if you are not state certified, do not apply to anything but state police in Michigan)

Most of the former military members that are in the work search programs come from MOS fields that lack a viable skilled trade.

It would seem infantrymen and swabbies need the most assistance crossing over.

You have tons of skills, but few of them are direct crossovers for employment in the civilian world. During Seps you will be given assistance writing an application and learning about what fields you cross over to.
I have several years supervisory experience that make me uniquely qualified to be a manager at Denny's or a production supervisor at a factory if I didn't get MCOLES certification and take additional college classes.

A guy with a young family to provide food and shelter for would have a harder time trying to make the college time work.

There are federal jobs. Some of them are easy to get into, others are not. I had been offered a few before I got out. The pay would have been good, but the locations were always bad.

I have a younger wife who wanted to go home to Michigan, so that is where I went.

There are few federal jobs in Michigan.

Your mileage may very, if you are in a coastal state there is bound to be more opportunity in the federal jobs field.

In closing, consider what you have always wanted to do when making your choice. This post is not intended to scare you off. It is to make you aware of what it is really going to be like. I am not posting a "I know this guy who... or a "I have a friend (of a step-brothers sisters second cousin) who went directly to work for big money corp. and is paid the big bucks to ..." :rofl:

All of this that I post has been from my experience and the experience of others that I am trying to assist as a service rep.

I don't regret serving my time, good and bad.
I wouldn't be the man I am today without it.
I care less for the misconceptions and politics I have to wade through to get service-members the assistance they need.
It seems (in my experience) that the one's who need it most come from Naval (technical big ship related) and 03 & 11B fields.

Most of my friends who have are out are very successful and happy with what they do.

Most of them were just as successful and happy in the service and in their field.

I wish the same success for any new servicemember who signs up for the ride of a lifetime today.

I have seen a lot of kids go open contract who had great potential end up washing out because they had unrealistic expectations and found themselves doing something that they perceived to be trivial and unimportant.

This is why I ask you to consider what you have always wanted to do when making this decision.

I look at it this way:

The Armed Forces are way behind in their methods to match skills to need. They look at immediate need only and have tunnel vision when looking at the future. I know it isn't all fun to be a recruiter, I have been there before. I know what some recruiters will do to get their numbers. I always tried to match the prospect to their assessed level, attitude, current skill, and desire over pushing open contract.

Those that were good matches from the start made it and were happy. those who were good prospects usually completed successfully but their satisfaction was always less than the first group. Then there are those others who usually wash out right away or don't complete their first enlistments.

I try to keep as many people in that first group as possible because it is the only group that enjoys both parties receiving 100% from each-other.

Wrangler100
12-23-2006, 05:04
Join.

When you're standing on the grinder during graduation you'll be glad you did and you'll find out what you're made of...

Semper Fi! :usmc:

02LimitedX
12-23-2006, 06:10
The career I think I'd most enjoy would be in L.E. Either state or local level.

ret_marine2003
12-24-2006, 00:18
Originally posted by 02LimitedX
The career I think I'd most enjoy would be in L.E. Either state or local level.

Excellent.

The Marines will give you many of the skills that are necessary for longevity in that field. (irregardless of what MOS)

All you have to do is learn those skills and remain trainable.

Needs and rules change with the mission.

M.P.'s are not direct crossovers to civilian L.E., but it isn't a bad way to go and many of those skills you would learn will apply to civilian L.E. Just about every branch of service is looking for more M.P.'s right now.

Many of the people I work with were former infantry or combat arms related groups that worked with the infantry.

Keep in mind that you will need to keep your tattoos reasonable, debts squared away and paid up on time, and you will have to be certified according to the laws in your state when you decide to seek a L.E. job outside of the armed forces.

Not all L.E. jobs are physically demanding, but many are.
Keep in mind that L.E. jobs are easier than infantry work most of the time.

The toughest thing is the relearning and learning new ways of doing things and making them muscle memory.

02LimitedX
12-24-2006, 07:10
Thanks to everyone for your help!

02LimitedX
12-28-2006, 18:56
Ok Marines, I have an appointment with my recruiter on wednesday! Any last minute advice?

Armed Infidel
12-28-2006, 22:10
Originally posted by 02LimitedX
Ok Marines, I have an appointment with my recruiter on wednesday! Any last minute advice?

Don't drop your soap in the shower! :rofl:

Seriously, always give your best and never give up! You'll be amazed at what you can do! Keep focused, remember you’re part of a team, use your individual skills and talents for the good of the team and not to exalt yourself. Don't get sucked in to any dissentious clichés or groups.

There is no greater single accomplishment this side of heaven than to become a United States Marine!

God’s speed and Semper Fidelis! :drillsgt:

1985 4Runner
12-28-2006, 22:28
Originally posted by 02LimitedX
Ok Marines, I have an appointment with my recruiter on wednesday! Any last minute advice?

Google the stories of Marines charged with murder in Iraq.


While I am proud of my service & Honorably discharged, I would not encourage anyone to enlist right now. The Marines are NOT taking care of their own & we are fighting this war with two hands & a foot tied behind our back.
On the other hand, the Corps desperately NEEDS men & women who still believe in Corps values & not a fast-track brass career. Officers who are not willing to sacrifice our Marines to further a career or satisfy a political entity, (& lose this war in the process).

We are there to Destroy the enemy. We are not being allowed to do our job.

If you choose to serve in the finest branch of our military I salute you.

God Bless you & Goodnight Chesty Puller, wherever you are.

squeakr
01-01-2007, 09:22
"You'll get better training in the Marine Corps. Other branches might be able to offer money or more jobs because they have a bigger budget for those things, but the training is much better in the Corps."

I would have to qualify this as it is definitely not true in the Hi-Tech sector. As for combat tactics and weapons and physical training you can't beat the Corps (excpet for the special forces but they are always the exception. As for the skilled trades, I would disagree. I thought the same thing until I got out and started working with those from other forces and the Navy and Air Force definitely get better technical training (and have better budgets). The Marines have no training for Medical (we are treated by the Navy and in some cases the Army), the Navy has Nuclear training (can almost be guaranteed a civilian job, as my Dad's company, the largest Electricity conglomerate and owner of the most Nuke plants, hires exclusively from the Naval side for its reactor operators due to the nuclear sub training and that there is very little civilian side training that exists for this job), and the Air Force and Army have better technology, hence more advanced training. When I was in, the latest and greatest gear that we were fielding to replace our units had been in use in the Army and Air Force for over 5 years (heck we couldn't even communicate with them as our equipment was so outdated). When we went to class on the repair of it, the class was taught by Army instructors as they had been using it for 5 years already.
Enough said on that, though as you are looking at possibly L.E. as a career and the only better background for that job would maybe be the Air Force, and I say maybe as the training is really close.
Don't think that I am bitter, as I don't regret joining the Marines and giving up all I have for my country (I am on full disability from the Corp due to injuries sustained in service, as it has made me the person I am today. I look back on my time in the Corps (the good and the bad) and regret nothing. I am just saying look at all options as some services can offer more if you are sure of what you want. If all you want is to be a Marine, then no other service can offer that. Even though others may have gotten better training than I, they all state that I have the better respect for having done what I have done.

Flat out.....the title Marine commands respect (the only soldiers that have told me they don't feel less in title are the special ops guys, I also work with Rangers and SEALs) but they have earned that right as have my fellow Marines.

The only question I have is why do the Marines not get their own budgets? They are considered a Branch of the military, but their budget always comes as a portion of the Naval budget. It is high time that we got our own budget. My Navy friends always tried to down play the title of Marine by telling me that I was just a department of the Navy. I responed yes that is true....the MEN'S department and that kills them. :rofl:

But if you think you had it bad try going through Boot with my name:


Dan Dailey (different spelling, but didn't stop the constant riding), although it paid off at the Ball as most drinks were free for me as everyone wanted to by the Marine Dan Dailey a drink..:thumbsup:

Semper Fi

ret_marine2003
01-02-2007, 04:07
Almost all of the Marine training outside of Infantry and Comm is conducted at Army, Navy, or Air-force training facilities.

The training for these non-infantry MOS groups is the same as the training the doggies, squids, and chair force receive. :supergrin:

Because of this, nobody else has the edge on training for these things.
There are some portions of advanced training in some MOS groups that receive modification to suit Marine Corps needs and logistics.
Explosive Ordinance training is a good example of this.
Marines and Army use different ordinance and equipment.
EOD training in the Marine Corps is/was coveted and spots were rare. You had to have a little rank and be squared away to get that training. When I went I noticed that the Army would send anyone that wanted to go EOD and there were a lot of new boots there. Some failed to complete the training.

All infantrymen receive basic medical training and retrain annually or bi-annually.

The Marine corps has Navy Corpsmen for more serious medical services. It is a good arrangement and makes sense if you think about it.

As I said before, if you want medical, join the Navy or the Army.

Another poster mentioned Marines being tried for crimes against civilians.
All branches of the armed services have had members charged with crimes against civilians at some time or another. We are all people from different backgrounds, we are all Americans or want to be Americans. People are imperfect and make mistakes. Some mistakes are more serious than others. There are good people and bad people too. It is like anything else in life.

Most of the service-members that have been brought up on charges failed to use discretion and common sense and are facing the consequences for their actions.

Keep in mind that you have orders and are to obey all LAWFULL orders. Does this mean that when your captain tells you to do something you get to debate it on the basis of an unknown or perceived threat? -NO-
This means that when someone tells you to do something that you know is absolutely morally wrong to ANOTHER PERSON you don't have to do it and should refer that individual to someone further up in your chain of command.

This may include setting of a grenade in the green zone because you want to go home, putting dog collars on prisoners, doing other stupid and pointless things to prisoners, and allowing people to take pictures while you do these things. It may also include any kind of sexual assault on anyone at any time and definitely include any and all attempts to harm yourself or other Marines.
You will be taught the difference between your weapon and your gun in boot camp, make sure you don't confuse it.

Use common sense and be the best man that you can possibly be and you will be safe from the criminal justice system.

Some people are charged and are victims of circumstance, and most of those people are cleared of any wrong doing by a jury of enlisted men. (This is something that you rarely find in a "Google" search because once the news becomes positive it is considered no longer worth reporting.)

squeakr
01-02-2007, 11:18
"Because of this, nobody else has the edge on training for these things."

I agree with most of your posting, but the above statement only applies when comparing apples to apples. Other forces can and do get better training in the non-infantry MOS areas as they need it to do their job. I mean to say that no one in the Corps has as good of training ss the nuclear techs from the Navy, and that is beacause we have no need for it as we don't use the nuclear technology or the Medical of the Army or Navy, as once again don't utilize it. This is why I stated that some have the edge, and this is due in part to the nature and needs of their MOS. My main reason for posting was to rebutt the previous posted statement that the Marine Corps gets the best training out of all of the forces (I agree on some fronts but this is a broad statement to support and is actually false at times for the reasons that I have stated and supported). I was in comm and saw the differences in the training as you stated we are trained at different facilities (but friends trained in Lasers went to Army base for training like you also stated, although they didn't go on to the further training that some forces did as the job need for Marines wasn't there, hence the Army and others in this case received better training due to need and would thus have an edge in the training area).

Overall, I agree that your post is dead on, I was just splitting hairs as there are differnces and sometimes broad blanket statements are both incorrect and not apllicanle.
:wavey: :wavey:

1985 4Runner
01-02-2007, 19:04
http://www.pendleton8.com/index.html

http://www.pendleton8.net/

Make an informed decision. The powers that be will not always tell you the truth or the full story.


On a personal level I am tremendously disappointed in my beloved Marine Corps command for trying my fellow Marines for War Crimes when those charged are the ones winning the war. :crazy:


Chesty Puller, Smedley Butler and Dan Daly to name a few, are all spinning in their graves.

Semper Fi & Carry On.

RM
01-02-2007, 20:38
Originally posted by ret_marine2003
Almost all of the Marine training outside of Infantry and Comm is conducted at Army, Navy, or Air-force training facilities.

The training for these non-infantry MOS groups is the same as the training the doggies, squids, and chair force receive. :supergrin:


Well yes and no, there are MOSs beside 03 and 06 that have their training on Marine bases (01s, 04s, 13s and trackers come to mind) and not all comm is trained at MCCES at 29 Palms. There is a comm school for Marines at Sheppard AF bases that trains some esoteric type of communications.

As to training on other services bases, the training occurs but under direction of US Marines. I was an instructor at one of the army schools and there was a common core training program that both Army and Marine Lts went through. However, there was allot (like 120 hours) of additional training for the Marines on the Army's commandant time. The enlisted side of the house, there was no common core training and the Marine followed a totally different POI and never interacted with the army IET students.

ret_marine2003
01-03-2007, 01:47
Originally posted by RM
Well yes and no, there are MOSs beside 03 and 06 that have their training on Marine bases (01s, 04s, 13s and trackers come to mind) and not all comm is trained at MCCES at 29 Palms. There is a comm school for Marines at Sheppard AF bases that trains some esoteric type of communications.

As to training on other services bases, the training occurs but under direction of US Marines. I was an instructor at one of the army schools and there was a common core training program that both Army and Marine Lts went through. However, there was allot (like 120 hours) of additional training for the Marines on the Army's commandant time. The enlisted side of the house, there was no common core training and the Marine followed a totally different POI and never interacted with the army IET students.

Yes, this is the way that much of the entry level training is conducted, however the way the training is being conducted still has to meet the standards of the host facility. I have plenty of certificates from Army and Navy facilities to show for it. Nobody will get less than what they need.

And I agree that the Marines have exclusive training for more than just comm, and you get to utilize more of that with rank and time.

Extra training is more available to more enlisted in other branches of service because of funding and the need to fill seats.

The Marine Corps is very frugal. It always has been. Extra training is an honor reserved for those who seem best able to use it.

Other branches of service seem to throw it at anyone.

The Marines only offer it to those who need it and are likely to complete it and use the information to the benefit of the Marines.

I do not believe that any other branch of service that offers the same MOS will train you "better".

They all train the same and they train according to need.
The minor differences don't mean that much. They have more to do with the needs of service and what is required to do the job.

Further training is available in all branches of service.

Marines tend to use more outdated equipment than other branches of service do.

We probably still use HAWK missile systems.
(Korean war technology)

Nobody else uses them any more, but the Marines kept them because there was noting available during desert storm to fill the gap that these missiles would leave if they were mothballed.

I always felt bad for HAWK missile system operators, they make a easy stationary and shiny target and I couldn't imagine what it must be like to operate that giant erector set under stress. There is a lot that can go wrong for an operator.

I imagine much of the debate is more likely from "the grass is greener on the other side" of the fence prospective that some of us acquire until we get to the other side. Then you find that the grass is still the same and you become nostalgic for the old grass sometimes.;)

Coincidentally, the Marines used to have a nuclear program. It was phased out in the late 1980's. Since the Marines don't operate or store Nuclear equipment, there is no need for a Marine Nuclear program.
If you want to go nuclear, better join the Army or Navy and plan on a lot of training and a very thorough background check.

02LimitedX
01-03-2007, 20:23
Ok, I took the enlistment test and did fairly well. Going next week to take the asvab and for a physical. I want infantry; assault man or rifleman. Going to do the delayed entry cause I have some stuff to take care of here first. But I'm on my way!

MarineCorp5811
01-04-2007, 15:19
Would you guys think it better to sign up as soon as im 18(Feb 12 2008, dad said he wont sign for me to go to the Corps) or as soon as i graduate?(June of 2008)

blubottlemax
01-04-2007, 15:34
The earlier in the year you sign up, the more job openings (boat spaces) will likely be available to you.

srtungate
01-04-2007, 21:16
Originally posted by 02LimitedX
I want infantry; assault man or rifleman.

Mortarman, 0341 only way to go!

rktman26
01-04-2007, 21:17
The Marines, I can assure everyone here, are continuing to take care of their own.

The HAWK missile system went out of commision in the early 1990's.

The "nuclear program" we had was the capability to deploy nuclear weapons from strike aircraft. That capability is no longer exercised by the MArine Corps.

The opportunity to take college classes is made available. While it may not be possible for you specifically, at your unit, in your MOS, at the time in yourdeployment cycle, for youto take advantage of it, it is made available.
I am quite certain that a number of Marines are currently enrolled in college classes while in Iraq. The first college course I ever took was Spanish 101, at FOB Kalsu Iraq.

ret_marine2003
01-05-2007, 03:41
What replaced the HAWK?

Last time I talked to an operator was 1995. They were still around then, they were still training new operators at Redstone.

The Marines I knew that kept the solitary "nuclear" magazine at 29 Palms played a mean game of volleyball, and that was about all they seemed to do. I wondered what would happen to them when the whole the nuclear program would be dropped. I knew that very few of them would like to be ammo techs, too much work in that. :rofl:
It was no surprise when it was dropped.
As I said before, the Marines are frugal and always have been. Too many important people saw a distinct lack of productivity and commented on the need for a more appropriate use of manpower.

While education may be available for some, make no plans on it being available for you, work on your MCI's instead. MCI's are far more important if you want to promote and MCI's apply directly to what you are doing and will cost you nothing.
(unlike anything you may take in your freshman year of college)

02 Limited LX is looking for infantry.
MCI's are the way to go if you are infantry.
I strongly recommend getting them done.

If you are infantry the best thing you can do in regards to college is hope that you don't get the time to take any classes. This would mean that you screwed up, are a screw up, or have found your way into a screwed up position.

If I had it to do over again I would refuse the G.I. Bill.
Federal Student Aid is a hell of a lot better, and believe it or not, you cant have both at the same time.

If you want to go to college, do it and go ROTC Navy.
With luck you may be a Marine Officer someday.
Join Americorps CNCS, just don't drink the liberal cool-aid if you do.
That will pay for your college better than the G.I. Bill and give you a living stipend and sometimes it provides (sort of) free housing.

blubottlemax
01-05-2007, 12:00
I reply to above, I definetly would NOT refuse the GI bill. I found when I got out that I did not qualify for student aid at most area schools. They said I had to pay $10,000 of my own expenses first before I would qualify for anything. They were MORE than happy to sign me up for student loans, but no free ride here. Granted, each State is different, but for the cost ($1200) you cannot beat the benefits the GI bill provides. I could not have taken many of my classes without it.

RM
01-05-2007, 18:32
Originally posted by rktman26


The "nuclear program" we had was the capability to deploy nuclear weapons from strike aircraft. That capability is no longer exercised by the MArine Corps.

The opportunity to take college classes is made available. While it may not be possible for you specifically, at your unit, in your MOS, at the time in yourdeployment cycle, for youto take advantage of it, it is made available.
I am quite certain that a number of Marines are currently enrolled in college classes while in Iraq. The first college course I ever took was Spanish 101, at FOB Kalsu Iraq.

Nuclear program involved more than air, my last gunny was one of the last 0813 nuclear weapon assemblymen for artillery.

Kalsu was turned back over to the army prior to hand off to I MEF (FWD) for OIF 5.7.1, however you correct if you are on Al Asad, Fallujah or TQ and one of the guys who works the 9-5 jobs you can take college classes. However if you are at Al Qiam, Korean Village, Hit, Haditha or some of the other small FOBs, your chances of taking classes would be pretty slim.

I think I have only seen a couple of guys successfully taking college classes in my years in other than guys who got MECEP, etc.

RM
01-05-2007, 18:43
Originally posted by ret_marine2003
What replaced the HAWK?



The Stinger, we kind of gave all mid-high level defense to fixed wing and when ever we deploy army Patriots.

02LimitedX
01-18-2007, 20:57
Well its done! I did the physical and asvab and swore in Wednesday! I'm headed for PI Aug. 13th! I'm excited!!!!

blubottlemax
01-19-2007, 18:59
Congrats and best of luck! Oohrah!!!!

Wrangler100
01-19-2007, 19:10
Originally posted by 02LimitedX
Well its done! I did the physical and asvab and swore in Wednesday! I'm headed for PI Aug. 13th! I'm excited!!!!

Good for you, another one headed for immortality in the brotherhood.

By 18 Aug you'll be thinking, "WTF did I get myself in to?" Don't worry, it will pass. Don't volunteer (including information), stay in the middle and try not to stick out. Get in good shape, running 3 miles, pull ups and pushups. You can look up the PFT scores on the internet.
When the DI asked who played football in HS or college, one guy in our platoon raised his hand. The DI thrashed (PT) him until he cried. Really....

MarineCorp5811
01-22-2007, 17:59
Should you do the best you can for the PFT or still try and not be the lead dog and put yourself in the open?

Wrangler100
01-22-2007, 19:14
Sorry, I did not mean to be "in the middle" with everything, just the day to day stuff. You should absolutely do your best on the rifle range, pugil pit (do they still do that?), and in your PFT for scoring. The DIs want you to work as a team, they look for leadership skills but individuals get "extra" attention...

MarineCorp5811
01-22-2007, 19:33
Could the extra attention be at all helpful?

blubottlemax
01-22-2007, 19:36
Just to clarify, I'm pretty sure what Wrangler meant about individuals is not to stick out like a sore thumb. Your PT test is an individual event, you will not be punished for doing well on it. Rifle qual is an individual event, again, you will not be punished for being the platoon high shooter. Where you do not want to stand out, is in screwing up. Don't be the guy out of step doing drill, don't be the last one out of the rack in the morning, don't be the one who didn't polish his boots or shave. It's those 'individuals' that get the extra attention. Sometimes it doesn't matter though. We had a drill instructor who joined us when we went to Camp Pendleton. After about a week, he comes up to me and says he's going to catch me screwing up, and when he does, my you know what will be his. Well for the next 3 weeks, I always see him looking at me, he watched me like a hawk (I think he even used that exact term, ha ha). On what I think was the second to last day at Camp Pendeleton, we were field daying the barracks, and I had to clean all the window sills. Our barracks just so happened to be on the very end, where you can see I-5 and the ocean from every window. As I was cleaning the window sills, I must have looked up for 1/2 a second because next thing I know he is next to me with a big grin on his face, saying he saw me staring out the window. A pretty good thrashing resulted for about the next hour. At least it was indoors and not out in the pit. He left me alone after that. Just try to follow orders and do what everyone else is doing (unless they are just all screwing up!) and you will be okay. :animlol:

Wrangler100
01-22-2007, 20:26
:laughabove: Similar thing happened to me, the DI's name was Sgt Batinga.


Yep, that's what I meant - don't be a screw up, don't be a malingerer (last).