Marsh piggies... the LONG STORY version [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Sharker
01-29-2007, 10:01
Well I met up with my buddy about 630am. It was cold, but going to warm up nicely to about 67 today. We headed off in the boat into the dark tannin stained water heading west. As we gained speed the cold cut at any exposed skin, causing great discomfort, despite the multiple layers of flannel and neoprene. I was all smiles. My first hunt of the year and it was going to be a perfect day.
http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j60/jareddunton/pig-islandarrival.jpg
We rounded the 100th bend in the river, and my buddy turned the bow towards a small cove at the base of a old dead cypress tree. As we neared, I felt the boat lurch onto the banks mud, exposed by the low tide. I hoped off, and immediately was greatful I was wearing chest waders as I sunk up to my thigh in soft river mud. After stuggling to free myself, I made my way onto the bank and then secured the boat. http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j60/jareddunton/pig-boat.jpg
Now that we were still, I realized how nice a day it actually was. Probably 45 degrees, and warming steadily. I began to shed layers as I knew I would generate alot of heat moving through the marsh grass. The spot we had landed on was high and dry, with a small clump of oaks and alders. Our gear would be safe here. My buddy was preparing his bow for the days hunt. http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j60/jareddunton/pig-brad2.jpg
I removed my .45acp handgun, a Sig P220, and press checked it to ensure it was ready for quick use. These piggies were liable to appear suddenly and when startled could just as likely run at you as away from ya.

With our gear stowed, and our minds prepared, we slipped out of the hardwood stand, and entered the marsh. It was vast. http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j60/jareddunton/pig-landscape2.jpg http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j60/jareddunton/pig-landscape5.jpg
To my left was a stand of 8 foot cattails, to my south (straight ahead) was low marsh grass (1-2 foot tall) which eventually bordered tall cattails some 200 yards away. To my right (west) was a hundred yard stretch of low marsh grass before a long narrow stand of hardwoods marked the boundry between us and the small feeder creek that seperated us from the next island. The wind was coming lightly from the South west, so we decided to split up and both border the marsh grass. My buddy would walk the tall cattails directly infront of us, as I would walk the hardwoods that bordered the creek off to the right. Because I was mainly acting as a spotter so my buddy could harvest a pig with his bow, we made up a series of hand signals to guide him onto a pig should I spot one. I was only going to use the handgun if it was needed.

After the first 100 yards I was hot. The temperature had climbed a bit, and the heat my body was making from pulling my feet from the soft mud was incredible. Everywhere I stepped, my feet sank from ankle to knee deep. A 4-5 inch layer of water covered the entire marsh. It was both noisy and tiring. Brad had moved into position against the cattails, and I was near the hard woods. Pig sign was everywhere. Tracks, scat, and fresh rooting was the norm, not the exception. The island stank from the amount of pig poo that was seemingly everywhere.

After another 100 yards, I finally spotted movement. at first I was unsure what it was. The grass was moving in a direction opposite the wind. I could see the mud around the grass, but nothing was there. I was loosing my mind I figured. Yet sure enough, ther grass moved again. I was perplexed. I stood there watching the grass, 30 feet away, move, yet nothing was there. After 3 minutes I finally heard a pig. I was still confused, but decided, now would be a good time to draw my handgun. I was 10 feet from the 8 foot tall marsh grass to my right, and straight ahead I had grass moving. The waders presented a problem in removing the handgun from my hip, but I finally got it out silently. Brad had steadily moved away from me, and I wasnt able to get his attention. Finally a pig head appeared out of the mud. I was really confused now, but no time to think on that. The pig was literally materializing out from the ground 30 feet infront of me. I was trying deperately to signal Brad, 200 feet to my left. http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j60/jareddunton/pig1.jpg

After 3 minutes the pig had narrowed our gap to 15 feet. It was a nice eating sized pig, probably 120 pounds on the hoof. It was also a colored pig, brown and blond, although the mud had made that barely perceptible. Brad had still not looked my way. I was begining to think I would have to pop this one, as any second it was sure to see me towering above the knee high grass I was standing in. Out of the corner of my eye, I finally saw Brad look my way. I motioned towards the pig, and immediatly, I saw him stiffen. He set out a stalk towards the pig 15 feet away. It had now begun to feed towards Brad, and away from me.
http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j60/jareddunton/pig-brad-stalk.jpg
After another 5 minutes, Brad had got close enough to arrow the pig. He stepped out from dehind the low sage that he had used to break up his stalk, and drew. I focused on the pig as the arrow flashed through my sight. I heard the tell tale thuwump and heard the pig grunt as it headed directly for the tall stand of cattails 10 feet away. I listened for the next minute as he crashed through sapplings and the grass. The silence. Brad and I hurried together and exchanged high fives. I also finally made sense of how the pig "appeared." There was a small feeder creek he had traveled down. He had begun to feed on the roots as he made his way up onto the marsh. Relieved I wasnt crazy I prepared for the recovery. The pig had moved into 8 foot tall cattails. Nothing like going into the thick stuff with 2 foot visability and making a bunch of noise the whole way. Brad decided he would cicle the thick stuff and cut off the exit, as I would push in through the thick stuff bird dogging the blood trail. http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j60/jareddunton/pig-wherehewent.jpg

Blood was everywhere as I moved in. http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j60/jareddunton/pig-blood.jpg Bright red and frothy, it belied a lung shot. I was trying to move silently, but the dry grass crackled loudly.... to loudly for my pleasure. I found the arrow 30 feet in. It had broken off right ahead of the fletching, and the mechanical broad head had been destroyed. Another 50 feet and I reached a high area, that was dry and with out the marsh grass. http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j60/jareddunton/piglandscape.jpg Blood abounded. I was forced onto my hands and knees here. Not something I found enjoyable. I was now unable to shoot well, and unable to move quickly if the need arose. I was also hot. Sweat was pouring from me, as the temp was now surely around 60 degrees.

After another 20 yards the pig had crossed a creek and moved into more thick stuff. The blood was beginning to dry up, so I began to worry. I had gone 150 yards at this point. The pig was heading towards one of the rivers. If he crossed we would be done. I pushed on. I found fresh scat, still steaming from its freshness. Obviously the pig had been here recently. I could smell it at times. Now I was beginning to worry I was pushing it. Surely it wasnt still alive. It had taken an arrow through at least one lung, likely two, and had been pumping blood for the last 75 minutes. Many times I would find areas where the pig had layed up, and all said, more than 3/4s a gallon of blood had been shed at this point. I was beginning to hear the river now.

When I reached the rivers bank, I was sick. The pig had made it to it, and crossed. Tracks showed its passage. We were now deflated. With no abilty to retrieve it, and hours spent on recovering it, we were left with no bacon. Nothing could have been worse.


On a side note. We saw 3 more pig through out the day. We passed up on them to find the other one, but to no avail. On the way out we found an old home site (I guess there is no place untouched by man), and on our tracks some pigs had rooted up and area about 30 feet by 80 feet. What an amazing place.
http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j60/jareddunton/pig-rooting.jpg

noway
01-29-2007, 11:28
Nice post and your story mirrors mine except the cattail where dead blown over and I had to crawl and go thru vegation as thick as a fishing gill net in search of my wounded possible fatally hog.


After another 20 yards the pig had crossed a creek and moved into more thick stuff. The blood was beginning to dry up, so I began to worry. I had gone 150 yards at this point. The pig was heading towards one of the rivers. If he crossed we would be done. I pushed on. I found fresh scat, still steaming from its freshness. Obviously the pig had been here recently. I could smell it at times. Now I was beginning to worry I was pushing it. Surely it wasnt still alive. It had taken an arrow through at least one lung, likely two, and had been pumping blood for the last 75 minutes. Many times I would find areas where the pig had layed up, and all said, more than 3/4s a gallon of blood had been shed at this point. I was beginning to hear the river now.

The above should be mandatory reading for those that think a 22LR is the magically killing bullet. A arrow in your case and a 45colt bullet in mine and possibility of 2 bullets and yet no recovered hog ;sad


Hogs are tuff ( period ) and not fragile like a deer which is also tuff and durable. Hunting them in the thick marsh and stick grass, malecuas and palmettoes with vines, tropical soda apple patches and god knowns what else , make for some of the hardest hunting.


It's not as easy as hunting in SE/MI ;) if I had to say.


FWIW: I notive a trend with hogs that have been shot they seem to defecate alot. My sow left a few moist turds that I do believe where from her on the path of blood.


Sharker don't let this get you down, when you fall off the horse git back on and try again ;)

Sharker
01-29-2007, 13:23
Yeah Noway, it sucked, but it wasnt as bad on me as the shooter. He was really bummed. I can honestly say, that that trip was the hardest physically I have ever had. (and I have hunted the mountains in Maine numerous times) The hard walking took a toll on my legs and back. The saw grass cut me up pretty good ( my left hand looks like it was paper cut 1000 times) and at one point I wandered into a crop of Spanish Bayonets. That sucked. I tried to manuever out of it, but wound up poking the Crap out of myself doing so. I was specked with puncture wounds from the upper thighs down. Looks like I was shot with size 8.

Would I do it again. Hell yes. Probably the most excitement I have had in 2 years. (I am actually trying to get tie off to go this weekend)

Oh BTW, the 6th photo down, you can see the back end of the pig behind the tree in center. Its just off to the right. There is also some video of the shot he says, but he cant email it, so I am gonna have to wait to post the link to it. I really tried to get some good pics.

noway
01-29-2007, 16:03
{and at one point I wandered into a crop of Spanish Bayonets}

Yeap been their done that and the Bayonets are bad. Bad go in and worst go out.

Sharker
01-30-2007, 09:15
Hey Noway, question for ya.... on of the Spanish Bayonets had fruit (by that it looked like Red Bell Peppers) so I plucked 2. I want to plant them, but dont know if they will grow? Any experience with it. I would like them by the mail box so my neighbors dog will quit crapping beside it.

Oh and I reread the posts, and it sounds like I am out of shape. I am actually in really good shape, its just this was SO much more physical than any other style hunting I have done. I cant wait to go again though.
I am working at getting access to an island by my house (about 3 miles away). If so, I will be able to do this after work in the spring when the days get longer.

noway
01-30-2007, 11:38
Nope never hard of anybody planting them but that's a good idea on the mail box thing. Only bad thing, the dog might poop somewhere else that you might not like next, and the cycle continues ;) and then you have a yard full of bayonets.

I remember on Late Night TV ( maybe David Letterman ) he had a lady walking her dog to his yard and allowing it todo #1 & #2 by his gate. He waited her out and sprayed her and the dog with the water hose. ( I do believe it was stage but who knows )

It was quite funny ;)

Maybe you can get by with something like that. I did something bold with one of my sorry neighbor who's Yorkie and Westy would poop and even peep right by my front door and curb. I scoop his dog crap up and placed it on his front door step. After 2 incidents with this, he learned to keep his pooches off my sidewalk and door steps.

Never had a problem with him nor need to raise my voice and him or his dogs. I even sprayed one myself when it was tracking across my lawn off leash , now that I think about it ;)

Sharker
01-30-2007, 12:06
You know its funny. I never cared when it was my dog (a BIG rottie) leaving land mines in the yard, but now that hes dead, it irks me to no end. My big worry about they bayonets is that they spread like wild fire and have a yard full of them, cuz pulling one up would be a chore I would rather not do.

mossy500camo
01-30-2007, 20:41
Cool!:thumbsup:

duncan
02-03-2007, 17:09
Great story.

I still need ot go hog hunting.

G36's Rule
02-03-2007, 20:41
What I'm about to post is from my experience, so please don't take offense. This are my opinions based on my experience.








Hogs are no harder to kill than deer or ... well anything. If they are hit properly.

The pig might have been stuck in one lung, if you saw frothy blood, but not both lungs if it didn't die in a short period of time. A double lung shot means death in about a minute or less.

If you know you have pushed the animal once, don't push it again. Stop and wait about an hour or even more. In my opinion, any arrow struck animal should be an automatic one hour wait unless you can see the animal fall and not get up.

The reason you saw fresh scat is the hog was gut shot.

One of the reasons people think hogs are so hard to kill is that they inhabit some of the worst terrain. So shots are not always the best and as a result get wiffed a lot.

IMO.

:supergrin:

Sharker
02-05-2007, 07:57
Originally posted by G36's Rule
What I'm about to post is from my experience, so please don't take offense. This are my opinions based on my experience.

Hogs are no harder to kill than deer or ... well anything. If they are hit properly.

The pig might have been stuck in one lung, if you saw frothy blood, but not both lungs if it didn't die in a short period of time. A double lung shot means death in about a minute or less.

If you know you have pushed the animal once, don't push it again. Stop and wait about an hour or even more. In my opinion, any arrow struck animal should be an automatic one hour wait unless you can see the animal fall and not get up.

The reason you saw fresh scat is the hog was gut shot.

One of the reasons people think hogs are so hard to kill is that they inhabit some of the worst terrain. So shots are not always the best and as a result get wiffed a lot.

IMO.

:supergrin:
No offense taken.
I do think pigs are much hardier than deer. They have a thick callous plate that absorbs punishment well. And they seem quite able to take a pounding and keep going. Just my opinion.
I agree that if both lungs were hit it should have been an easy find, however the shot was straight broadside, and passed through. (arrow broke off ahead of the fletching, meaning it was hanging out to the fletching IMO) Good bright frothy blood to me should equate to a double lunger. But due to not being in the freezer, I am gonna have to say one lung.

Yeah, we likely did push it a bit... 30 minutes should have been enough in my mind,(figuring a double lunger as it appeared) but lesson learned.

I dont think the pig was gut stuck. No blood in the scat (though I understand not always the case with gut shots). And it was a good shot, hit it right behind the shoulder, straight on broadside. But who knows.

Terrain sucked for recovery. Wish we would have pinned it down, but like so many things with hunting, you cant control the outcome.

noway
02-05-2007, 08:54
{No offense taken.
I do think pigs are much hardier than deer. They have a thick callous plate that absorbs punishment well. And they seem quite able to take a pounding and keep going. Just my opinion.
I agree that if both lungs were hit it should have been an easy find, however the shot was straight broadside, and passed through. (arrow broke off ahead of the fletching, meaning it was hanging out to the fletching IMO) Good bright frothy blood to me should equate to a double lunger. But due to not being in the freezer, I am gonna have to say one lung.}

I have to side with Sharker on this and truely hate will people say "they ain't no harder than a deer". I seem hogs take arrows,buckshot, pistol, and even rifle and still manage to run a few 100yards, attack dogs and/or the hunter, and just about thrown out every James Bond trick in their hog "evade and escape plan" ;) THEY ARE HARDER TO KILL THEN MR/MRS DEER.

the truth is the anatomy between the two species is nowhere the same and when you are trying to stick one with an arrow out of all tools, they are very hard to kill. A sharp and I mean very sharp broadhead is need just to get thru the skin and shield as described above and then add in a very good place arrow. The vitals are also more protected than that of a deer. One hog I killed had a sheild that was about 2-3" thick and whent from the front chest area and over 3-4 ribs on both sides.

I never heard of any deer in my near 40years of life that has anything remarkly the same ;)

btw: that hog I just described it's dressed and fleshed hide weighed over 30lbs with tail bone attached. Yeap a hog skin with shield and tail bone alone was just right at 30lbs before I salt it. It now sit on my coffe table a table rug.


A fellow just a few week ago was out hunting hogs with his buddy and their dogs and he shot a Boar with a 454casull ruger and he need 3 shots to stop this hog and it still needed a finishing shot. One of his dog got hurt also ( not fatal ). He was very much amazed on the punishment that a 190lb hog could take and how much one can push out.


fwiw: I saw the hog carcass and help to drag it to his truck and all 3 of the orginal placed shot would be consider fatal , 2 in chest broadside above the elbow and one top place downward shot and like the guy said "it was 5mins of hell stopping this hog ;)"

Sharker
02-14-2007, 11:56
Heres a story my hunting buddy told me last week proving the tuff-ness of pigs.
My buddy was slipping through some wet marsh in a light rain, and he saw a big porker (300 plus, black russian, the real bad @$$es) coming at him about 40 yards away. Well he waits and the thing shifts broad side and he lines up his 44 mag rifle and lets the hammer drop.

BOOM.

Says the shot slams into the pig about 30 yards away, hits him right behind the shoulder. He said you could see the water and mud go flying off the pig as it got hit. The pig gets knocked over, then gets up and blows town like a scalded dog.

My buddy goes over and finds the tracks, and no blood. Follows the trail for about 150 yards, not one drop of blood. He said it never busted through the shield. A 250 grain bullet from 30 yards doesnt make it through the shield. Show me ANY deer that can take that abuse and still get away unscathed.

noway
02-14-2007, 13:50
Are you 100% sure it didn't make it thru the shield? and maybe it did and didn't exit the hog ? A 44mag projectile out of a rifle should have easily penetrated the shield. Heck a slower 45acp from a 5" bbl 1911 does ;)


Russians are bad but the euroasian hybrids are badder ( basically a Russian and newworld wild hog mix , they grow bigger than the russians and are twice as mean the local hogs )

A hog hunting preserve down here had a 200lb hyrbid that took over 6 arrows, killed one dog and injured 3 others and then the hunters pinned it down with their knees and shot it PB in the head with a 9mm pistol. It still was kicking after all of the above :shock:

( never seen it but this is what was relayed to me by the guide )

;)

Sharker
02-14-2007, 14:05
Its hard to believe, but the guy is pretty straight forward. He says it, so its good enough for me. But I do tend to think a .44 should have busted through the shield.

He said they walked over 150 yards and no blood. Again, not sure cuz I wasnt there, but it has caused him to only take neck shots from there on.

Not sure about the hybrids. I think they are all mean once they get walloped.

Oh and I got word that the locals had 2 kerrs (pitbull-mutts) killed one more chewed on by a big boar yesterday on the east side of the island. They said 450 plus with BIG cutters and a really bad attitude. Its still at large.

noway
02-14-2007, 18:50
Remember my previous mean sow hog story, I walked in over 60 yards before finding the 1st solid piece of blood outside of the spot where the hog was hit the 2nd time. The spot at the 1st encounter NETTED NO blood whatsoever and that hog walk/stumble/ran another 30-40 yards before I nailed her the second time and I'm 110% sure it was hit their and the 2nd spot. Also this was done out of a 7.5" bbl 45colt vrs a rifle and a 44magnum at that.



A 44magnum bullet should at least penetrated the shield with no ease.What it do or don't do after that, is another issue and I highly doubt the bullet "just" bounced off the hog ;)

{ot sure about the hybrids. I think they are all mean once they get walloped. }

Not 100% sure of that the Florida strand is pretty means as is. I read somewhere the hybrid are breed because typical russian don't get as big as the domestic wild hog strand. So the combo put the best of the two together and creates the purrffect game hog.