Finally! [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Bravo6
05-01-2007, 22:49
Well, after being an EMT at a Casino in FL for 3 years, I finally decided that I had enough and I got a job with a private ambulance service here that runs 911 calls with Fire/ALS. The EMS Coordinator that hired me told me to take everything I learned in school and throw it out the window because things are different in the street. Does that make sense? I have plenty of experience with medical calls, but I have very little experience with trauma calls. I had one open fx humerus and several really gnarly lacerations. I guess I will just have to learn that stuff the hard way. I also have my first code under my belt, CPR'ed our A's off but pt was DRT. Any advice for a new (to the street) EMT? I also have to buy new pants and boots, any recommendations welcome!

tarsij
05-01-2007, 23:45
Well I'll start off by recommending what equipment I use:

Pants: Elbeco - they have this really cool teflon in them that repels water and stains only thing is they don't breathe very well so expect some sweating down below

Boots: 6" Oakley - got them real cheap from oakley for being an EMT, extremely comfortable, great grip and almost no wear after 6 months of hardcore abuse (my boots normally last about 7 months, these will easily last at least year most likely alot longer)

Get a good stethescope. I use a Littman cardiology III, but you don't have to go that high end, they sell good littmans for less than $50 that will get the job done too

Always carry a couple of sets of shears, a couple penlights, a roll of tape and a bunch of pens... these always have a way of walking off I keep 3 shears, a 5-pack of penlights, 3 rolls of tape and about 100 pens in my bag that has permenant residence in my truck


Don't throw everything you learned in school out the window, things are different on the street but you will always revert to your training. Things on the street are a lot faster paced, you'll develop your own style of assessment to get it done quick but thorough. As for traumas, the best advice I can give you is:

1. make sure the scene is safe BEFORE you get out of the truck
2. when you go up and make pt contact, STOP, take a breath, then go on with your assessment.



most importantly, make the job FUN. make sure you get along with your partner as it makes for a very long day if you don't.

hotpig
05-02-2007, 08:46
Pants- Dikies from China-Mart will do. No need in spending a lot of money on pants that may not survive your first shift.

Boots- spend money on a good pair that offer ankle support.

Misc stuff ie shears, stethescope, pen lights, etc. Do nor waste your money on this stuff. Use the rookies because they get into buying stuff to hang on themselves. All that you need is a black pen and I always prefer my own stethescope. I buy the cheapest one that I can find. My last one lasted ten years before I lost it at a accident.

MD2010
05-02-2007, 13:48
Always carry a pair of trauma shears, a pen light, a roll of tape, and some pens. These are little things that are hard to find in the ambulance because they are small and/or have a tendency to walk off with other people because they stuff them in their pockets and forget they are their at the end of the shift and when you want them, you don't want to have to search through your jump bag for 10 mins. I also reccommend always having a good utility knife like a Gerber or something. They come in handy for cutting seatbelts and a whole slew of other things. As far as anything else, get a good pair a boot and comfy pair of BDUs to stow these things in. Other than that, good luck. Things are different on the street, they tend to be more fast paced and sometimes you have to get a little more creative and think on the fly, but don't forget yoru training because that's what will let you do that and do it effectively.


oh yeah, and my biggest piece of advice for the street...if you're a BLS provider in an ALS system you're probably goign to be driving a lot. Remember whatever you feel in the driver's seat the person in the back is feeling 10x. Give your medic a smooth ride and he'll love you forever. Avoid slamming those brakes, visually clear all your itnersections before proceeding, and make sure you take it light on the bumps and curves. Nobody likes getting tossed around while trying to give a drug or start a line.

Glkster19
05-02-2007, 14:51
Originally posted by hotpig
Misc stuff ie shears, stethescope, pen lights, etc. Do nor waste your money on this stuff. Use the rookies because they get into buying stuff to hang on themselves. All that you need is a black pen and I always prefer my own stethescope. I buy the cheapest one that I can find. My last one lasted ten years before I lost it at a accident.


We must have the same level of seniority. My goods that I carry at work: 1 nice writing pen, preferably Papermate and 1 cheap pen for the pts to sign the billing form and 1 dark blue Littman Cardiology III scope. I used to use the cheap scopes and discovered that a good one is worth its weight in gold. Just put a non-removable name plate on it and keep it close by, most people will be couteous enough to return it if they find it. At least the depts I interact with anyways.

mylt1
05-02-2007, 15:11
pants dont matter, get what you can afford for now. then figure out if they are holding up good enough to buy more. boots, safety toe and water proof, the only way to go. i have the bates enforcer TSP and they were ok. had a leak in the first pair after 30 days. called wolverine and had a new pair 3 days later. no problems for quite awhile after that. replacing them with 5.11 A.T.A.C.shields. also get some inserts. standing for any amount of time sucks in duty boots. get a good quality knife. never know when you will need it. you dont need to spend $200 on a M.O.D. but get one thats better than the $2.99 on at the counter at walmart. a good ink pen for you. i use zebra F-402's and hate when i forget it at home. other than that, a good hat and a good pair of sunglasses and your set. you will find out quickly what does and doesnt work. and yes, forget everything you learned in class, its a whole different world on the street.

D25
05-02-2007, 15:33
Just get a good pair of boots and a good stethescope. No, I should be more specific- get a pair of Danners, and a Littman. Then have a cutting tool of some sort- knife or shears whatever you prefer, maybe both. That's all you need. All that other crap is crap, and if you can't find absolutely everything on your ambulance instantly, then you're not doing your AM rig checks well enough or often enough.

Bravo6
05-02-2007, 22:08
First off I want to say thank you for the advice! I have some 5.11 pants right now, but they are fading pretty badly, I usually go through two pair in a year. Iím really thinking about the Elbeco pants that Tarsij mentioned. I am wearing a pair of Magnum Viper 6s that need replacing bad, I am looking at 5.11s and the Bates line; I just canít afford Oakley or Danner right now. Iíve got several pairs of trauma shears, that wonít be a problem, and as far as knives go Iím sure my Emerson Commander will be able to hack it (no pun intended). A friend of mine was hospitalized recently and he asked the nurses which steth was the best so he could buy me one for my birthday and he got me (surprise surprise) a Littman Cardiology III! MD 2010, thanks for the driving advice, I remember riding along as a student being thrown around in the box, and I figured that was just part of it, so thatís good to know. I am really looking forward to this, I am very excited, thanks again guys!

tarsij
05-03-2007, 09:19
The price of the Oakley boots is only $96 from http://www.usstandardissue.com great prices on everything there. the Cardiology III is a great scope, I've been using it for 2 years with excellent results. good luck and have fun....

D25
05-03-2007, 16:55
Originally posted by Bravo6
MD 2010, thanks for the driving advice, I remember riding along as a student being thrown around in the box, and I figured that was just part of it, so thatís good to know. I am really looking forward to this, I am very excited, thanks again guys!

It can really make all the difference in the world. My ground transports usually run around 35 min., and a bad ride really is a horrible experience. Just keeping the safety and comfort of your partner and the pt. in mind and you'll have a friend for life. Good luck to you.:thumbsup: