If you went to Parris Island... [Archive] - Glock Talk

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K9Glocker
05-02-2007, 19:58
then you would remember this part of a really long night!

http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p207/k9glocker/parrisdihires.jpg

Sir, Yes Sir and Semper Fi to all!

uz2bUSMC
05-08-2007, 13:51
Ahh yes, no sleep and hair in your collar, good times- good times...

JohnNC
05-19-2007, 20:22
I really remember that really long first night, and I recognize the stainless steel desks (bolted to the floor), but I don't remember getting the awesome haircut until the next day.

Steve in PA
05-21-2007, 00:18
I still have nightmares/flashbacks!! :shocked:

Kingslayer
05-21-2007, 10:58
I don't remember. Then again, there's not much about my first few days there that I can recall. I remember getting off the bus. I remember sitting in the barbers chair and that's about it.

pjva04
05-25-2007, 04:35
I remember thinking that cold breakfast of eggs, toast, and sausage they handed out while we were sitting at those desks was about the best damn meal I ever had.

lethal tupperwa
05-25-2007, 04:47
after the haircut but with no papers---No Sir, I am not in the Marines

"I Got off the train to smoke a cigarette!"

pjva04
05-25-2007, 05:54
Originally posted by lethal tupperwa
after the haircut but with no papers---No Sir, I am not in the Marines

"I Got off the train to smoke a cigarette!" :laughabove: :rofl:

Bonk
05-27-2007, 16:03
Circa 1988, that actually happened. A 17 year old kid flew into Charleston airport to visit his grandmother, who lived somewhere on the SC/GA line. He got lost looking for the exit, and wandered into the nearest bathroom, which happened to be where some PI Marines were coralling the next busload of recruits as they got off their flights. He comes out of the john, and an overeager corporal throws him in line for the next bus, despite the fact that he's carrying a suitcase (unlike the rest of the recruits) and had no orders. Despite his protests, he was taken to PI, and got the whole initial issue and haircut. It wasn't until the third day there that they actually figured out that the poor kid had not, in fact, enlisted. They called his grandmother and parents, who by then had filed missing persons reports on him in two different states, and gave them the red carpet treatment around the base.

Slateman
05-28-2007, 18:53
Originally posted by Bonk
Circa 1988, that actually happened. A 17 year old kid flew into Charleston airport to visit his grandmother, who lived somewhere on the SC/GA line. He got lost looking for the exit, and wandered into the nearest bathroom, which happened to be where some PI Marines were coralling the next busload of recruits as they got off their flights. He comes out of the john, and an overeager corporal throws him in line for the next bus, despite the fact that he's carrying a suitcase (unlike the rest of the recruits) and had no orders. Despite his protests, he was taken to PI, and got the whole initial issue and haircut. It wasn't until the third day there that they actually figured out that the poor kid had not, in fact, enlisted. They called his grandmother and parents, who by then had filed missing persons reports on him in two different states, and gave them the red carpet treatment around the base.

Thats funny :rofl:

BTW, I assume that picture is "The Moment of Truth?"

I leave Thursday . . .

K9Glocker
05-28-2007, 20:03
Originally posted by Slateman
BTW, I assume that picture is "The Moment of Truth?"

I leave Thursday . . .

Yeah...a really long moment. You have no idea and no one can explain it to you. Good luck, warrior and Semper Fi.

Always remember that those who have gone before you are the true meaning of the Marine Corps.

http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p207/k9glocker/iwo.jpg

gruntmedik
05-28-2007, 20:15
I went in Nov 85. Different building, but the effect is there. :supergrin:

:patriot: :usmc:

Slateman
03-14-2008, 01:44
Oh yea, I guess I should have mentioned this before, but I made it. A while ago in fact. Already in the fleet :D

Yea, that was a really, really long night/day/night . . .

tarbe
03-16-2008, 15:11
I recall the strangeness of feeling even the lightest breeze on my scalp.

I recall kids puking and passing out.

I recall thinking "I really don't want to draw any attention to myself....attention is BAD!"

Platoon 188 PISC August 1976

USMC1369
03-16-2008, 15:49
I really remember that really long first night, and I recognize the stainless steel desks (bolted to the floor), but I don't remember getting the awesome haircut until the next day.

Take a good look at that picture. There are a few motivated fools who already had that haircut when they got on the bus. There are a few long haired youngins' in the back hoping they're butt ain't next; and here we are - smiling at them all.

:usmc:

BullsEye10X
04-05-2008, 19:36
I spent the longest night of my life in that receiving building on June 7th, 1997. Still remember like it was yesterday!
:patriot: SEMPER FI! :usmc:

USMC Ryfleman
04-05-2008, 19:44
Memories................

Coogan
04-14-2008, 15:19
I spent the longest night of my life in that receiving building on June 7th, 1997. Still remember like it was yesterday!
:patriot: SEMPER FI! :usmc:

I had graduated the day prior - I was getting the Eagle, Globe and Anchor tattooed the morning your journey started.

BullsEye10X
04-14-2008, 15:38
Small world, eh Coogan?
I remember just a few days before graduation, our platoon had gone to get back our personal items (clothing and possessions that were taken from us that first day). We passed by some brand new recruits, still wearing their "go-fasters" with un-bloused trousers so they could get used to the heat, being run around every which way by the receiving DI's. No one said anything, but we were all thinking "Those poor bastards"... That was the point I realized how glad I was to have made it without getting recycled.

93GT
04-14-2008, 19:34
I remember that being the beginning of being awake for another 30 hours straight in 2000. You put your head down, but didn't dare to doze off. The phone call home with the prompt was funny.

That being said OCS inprocessing was much less stressful as far as what they imposed upon you, but the self-imposed stress just remembering what it was like to be in a boot camp environment again and anticipating it. Different ballgame all together down there, at least the crap was shorter lol.

02LimitedX
04-20-2008, 09:49
The phone call home with the prompt was funny.


It was indeed!

SASSGlock2
05-03-2008, 05:12
I remember that being the beginning of being awake for another 30 hours straight in 2000. You put your head down, but didn't dare to doze off. The phone call home with the prompt was funny.

That being said OCS inprocessing was much less stressful as far as what they imposed upon you, but the self-imposed stress just remembering what it was like to be in a boot camp environment again and anticipating it. Different ballgame all together down there, at least the crap was shorter lol.

Phone call home? The new Corps is much softer than the old Corps. :tongueout:We got to make our first call home on base liberty the Sunday before graduation. Unless you got top shooter at the rifle range, then you got a call for that.

Of course, everyone knows that as soon as you graduate, you become Old Corps and then next platoon coming through is softer and has it easier. Our DI used to call us the Pepsi Generation - If it hurts, ******* it! That was when they could still curse at us and occaisional physical contact was accepted if there were no marks left.

Rugby
05-03-2008, 07:54
Phone call home? The new Corps is much softer than the old Corps. :tongueout:We got to make our first call home on base liberty the Sunday before graduation. Unless you got top shooter at the rifle range, then you got a call for that.

Of course, everyone knows that as soon as you graduate, you become Old Corps and then next platoon coming through is softer and has it easier. Our DI used to call us the Pepsi Generation - If it hurts, ******* it! That was when they could still curse at us and occaisional physical contact was accepted if there were no marks left.

Really! Phone calls! I was handed a Red Cross post card and was told to write, "All is well, will contact you near graduation". That was it.

Annoyedgrunt
05-07-2008, 13:13
I'll never forget the sound of the Drill Instructor's voice as he got us off the bus; it sounded like he'd done a shot or two of Jack Daniels and then broke the bottle and gargled the broken glass!

Ptl 2117 Sep 29, 1998-Dec 23, 1998

BullsEye10X
05-07-2008, 13:24
Yeah, the first time I heard a DI's voice, it was a one-sided conversation:

:drillsgt: GET YOUR SORRY ________ OFF MY ________ BUS RIGHT ________ NOW!!!
You can fill in the blanks, I'm sure :supergrin:

93GT
05-07-2008, 14:39
Phone call home? The new Corps is much softer than the old Corps. :tongueout:We got to make our first call home on base liberty the Sunday before graduation. Unless you got top shooter at the rifle range, then you got a call for that.

Of course, everyone knows that as soon as you graduate, you become Old Corps and then next platoon coming through is softer and has it easier. Our DI used to call us the Pepsi Generation - If it hurts, ******* it! That was when they could still curse at us and occaisional physical contact was accepted if there were no marks left.

We didn't get phone calls at OCS. I guess that makes officers harder than enlisted by that logic....really I am kidding.

Really it is getting easier every year though. It doesn't help that they are more concerned about retention and recruiting now than in recent history either. Less drops and easier training schedule to avoid injury is something that is a reality right now. Plus, they are actually enforcing all of those you can't haze the living hell out of people rule they have now a days. They are actually gutting certain aspects of training schedules that produce more injuries to avoid someone getting recycled.

Oh and they still cursed and put hands on us in 2000, but it definitely could have gotten them into some insane trouble.

funwith45
06-03-2008, 13:16
I started there - Oct 17 1997

I remember the golden foot steps, no sleep for over 32 hours and the hair that was in my collar."It would not stop itching". I also remember those frozen solid sandwiches that we got at the rifle range. You were never sure what you would get in those brown paper bags.

I can remember foot lockers being tossed around.

jonusmcg
06-04-2008, 17:58
Always remember that those who have gone before you are the true meaning of the Marine Corps.


I think about that every day that I wear the uniform. Thanks for reiterating that. :)

usmcnam6869
06-05-2008, 06:40
May 1967,..plt 382,...back then they just beat the living H#ll out of you, natural part of the "Parris Island" experence.
Semper Fi......

Sgt. Rambo
07-04-2008, 10:33
I remeber the smell of saltwater and alligator S*ht...will never forget that. Actually like the food. I remember that first meal at oh dark thirty!! Still have dreams from time to time that they send me back to boot camp. Its always easier the second time in my dreams....LOL
To all the marines on active duty now....:usmc::drillsgt::yourock:
Semper Fi... stay safe!!

gruntmedik
07-07-2008, 16:24
Yeah, the first time I heard a DI's voice, it was a one-sided conversation:

:drillsgt: GET YOUR SORRY ________ OFF MY ________ BUS RIGHT ________ NOW!!!
You can fill in the blanks, I'm sure :supergrin:

I still recall one of the largest dark green Marines I have ever laid eyes upon stepping on the bus, and declaring "Welcome to Hell, I'm the devil. Get the **** off my bus. Do it now, MOVE!!!"

Ahhh, memories. :patriot: :usmc:

lowflash
08-05-2008, 18:51
I was there in 1964 and in Vietnam by 1965 made E-5 in less than two years. Got out in 1968 didn’t let the doors hit my ass on the way out.

Maine1
08-05-2008, 19:17
1991...straight off the farm too. Eyes wide to this new world, one that i'd wanted to visit since i was about 7. I remember listening very closely, wondering how guys my age could be so stupid when people were telling them EXACTLY what to do. Good times.

I really, truly did not apriciate being a Marine until after I had gotten out...i missed it then, and still do sometimes.

best, and worst group of people i have ever known.
Some were POS's, just like everywhere else, but at some point, in a tight spot, they would come throught, even if they did not like you.

3rd Battalion, where no one can hear you scream.

Sgt. Rambo
08-06-2008, 05:31
I was there in 1964 and in Vietnam by 1965 made E-5 in less than two years. Got out in 1968 didnít let the doors hit my ass on the way out.

God bless you brother....:usmc: