Why didn't Windows XP Pro OEM ask me to activate? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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SanduneCC
06-05-2007, 10:35
I bought a Windows XP Pro OEM from a Pricegrabber storefront outfit. After installing it into my new computer build, I notice it did not ask me to activate - online or phone in. Why? I'm not complaining, just curious whether I received the holy grail of an XP disc?

My previous 2 builds, also with XP Pro OEM, all required activation. It reminded you how many days you have left before the deadline.

chbix
06-05-2007, 12:22
hmmm, did you use a harddrive that previously had windows xp on it?

I know that the only time it asks me for a cd key and activation is if its on a fresh HD, if you take an old hd and install xp over the top of an old install (even if you format and then install) it will recognize it. At least thats my though.

chbix
06-05-2007, 12:23
repost

chbix
06-05-2007, 12:25
repost

sorry had internet issues and ended up posting this 3 times

SanduneCC
06-05-2007, 13:12
Brand new HD. Format and install. No activation. Is this a new MS policy?

Washington,D.C.
06-05-2007, 13:53
http://www.microsoft.com/resources/howtotell/ww/faq.mspx

Q:


When I purchase OEM Windows from a reseller, what should I receive?

A:


Genuine OEM Windows desktop operating system software is designed exclusively for computer manufacturers to pre-install on their computers. Genuine OEM software always comes with a Certificate of Authenticity (the OEM COA is different from an orange retail Proof of License label) and a manual or Quick Start guide. Some major manufacturers provide an OEM disc for re-installing programs, while smaller manufacturers are required to provide a Microsoft Windows edge-to-edge hologram disc. OEM software cannot be downloaded and may not be unbundled or re-bundled from sources other than the OEM selling you the computer. Visit our Counterfeit Gallery for more information at http://www.microsoft.com/resources/howtotell/en/counterfeit.mspx.

slewfoot
06-05-2007, 14:17
Originally posted by SanduneCC
Brand new HD. Format and install. No activation. Is this a new MS policy?

One quick way to find out if you bought a pirate copy. Go to Windows update and try to update your OS. They will either tell you to activate the copy of the OS or they will flat out reject your update and offer to sell you an activation number.

lens
06-05-2007, 15:25
Sounds very much like a bootleg/counterfeit copy. Tons out there being sold by storefronts, eBay, and local computer flea market shows.

SanduneCC
06-05-2007, 18:16
What's the downside to installing one of these counterfeits besides no update? Do they work the same? Can I get my money back if I complain to Pricegrabber or my CC?

Washington,D.C.
06-05-2007, 22:08
If it is an illegal hacked version it could have trojans, malware or a virus.

SanduneCC
06-05-2007, 22:55
Could that be the reason for my random reboot problem?

http://www.glocktalk.com./showthread.php?s=&threadid=710628

Blitzer
06-05-2007, 23:26
Go to Are you legit?

http://news.com.com/2100-1016_3-5550205.html

CNET News.com http://www.news.com/
Microsoft: Legit Windows or no updates

By Ina Fried
http://news.com.com/Microsoft+Legit+Windows+or+no+updates/2100-1016_3-5550205.html

Story last modified Tue Jan 25 21:00:14 PST 2005


Aiming to crack down on counterfeit software, Microsoft plans later this year to require customers to verify that their copy of Windows is genuine before downloading security patches and other add-ons to the operating system.

Since last fall the company has been testing a tool that can check whether a particular version of Windows is legitimate, but until now the checks have been voluntary. Starting Feb. 7, the verification will be mandatory for many downloads for people in three countries: China, Norway and the Czech Republic.

In those countries, people whose copies are found not to be legitimate can get a discount on a genuine copy of Windows, though the price varies from $10 to $150 depending on the country.

By the middle of this year, Microsoft will make the verification mandatory in all countries for both add-on features to Windows as well as for all OS updates, including security patches. Microsoft will continue to allow all people to get Windows updates by turning on the Automatic Update feature within Windows. By doing so, Microsoft hopes it has struck a balance between promoting security and ensuring that people buy genuine versions of Windows.

"We think that the best foundation for the most secure system is genuine software," said David Lazar, director of the Genuine Windows program at Microsoft. "We want to urge all of our customers to use genuine software. (At the same time), we want to make sure that we don't do anything to reduce the likelihood that a user will keep their system up to date."

The program, known as Windows Genuine Advantage, also offers perks to those who verify their copy of Windows. Those who do can get free software as well as discounts on other Microsoft products and services. Microsoft is upping the ante a bit, adding some additional discounts on MSN Games as well as on the company's recently announced Outlook Live subscription service to the existing list of benefits, which includes free access to the company's Photo Story 3 program.
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Customers do appear to be interested in double-checking the status of their operating system. Some 8 million people have been asked to participate in the program since testing began, and more than 5 million have taken part.

And those numbers have come with very little recruiting on the part of Microsoft, Lazar said.

"More and more we will be marketing the offers to broaden the participation," he said. "People do like free stuff."

Piracy is a major problem for Microsoft and others in the software industry. One software industry study estimated that more than a third of software is pirated, costing the industry $29 billion a year. Microsoft won't put an exact figure on its losses, but said it is certainly in the billions over the past 10 years.

The validation effort is just part of Microsoft's threefold program, which focuses on educating users, engineering products in ways that minimize piracy, and enforcement through the legal system.

As for the added security risk, Directions on Microsoft analyst Michael Cherry said that people are putting too much of the blame on the software maker.

Cherry said it is not necessarily Microsoft's responsibility to protect people who aren't paying the company for its products. He likened the situation to buying a fake Rolex and then expecting warranty service if the product breaks.

The problem with that analogy, Cherry acknowledged, is that a broken Rolex doesn't put other watch owners at risk, whereas vulnerable computers connected to the Internet threaten all PC users. However, Cherry said that many of the computers that are at risk are using genuine, but older versions of Windows.

"There's a growing chance that the people whose machines are being taken over are running older systems which aren't really securable," he said.

Cherry said he thinks the company is acting appropriately, noting that making sure people are running genuine Windows is important for all customers.

"I think they are entitled to do this, and I think it is in customers' best interest to know that they have a genuine version of the software," he said. Counterfeit copies could contain their own bugs or viruses, and there is no way to guarantee that security patches will work, even if the user can download them, he said.

While Microsoft is the obvious beneficiary if piracy rates go down, Cherry said programs like Genuine Advantage also help level the playing field for smaller computer builders who play by the rules and find themselves undercut by dealers offering PCs with bogus copies of Windows.

"Those are the people I hope the program is helping," Cherry said.


Copyright 1995-2007 CNET Networks, Inc. All rights reserved.

doktarZues
06-06-2007, 17:22
Uhh.. It's more than likely a Volume License Copy, or "corporate" version, that doesn't require activation. Perfectly legit to sell as "OEM". -dok

lens
06-06-2007, 22:39
Originally posted by doktarZues
Uhh.. It's more than likely a Volume License Copy, or "corporate" version, that doesn't require activation. Perfectly legit to sell as "OEM". -dok

No, it is NOT "legit" to sell as "OEM". Volume License copies are sold to specific companies (directly to the business) and are legal to load ONLY on computers at that business site.

People sell them all the time, but they aren't legal to sell that way.

doktarZues
06-07-2007, 20:06
It's definitely a grey area but companies have been doing it for years. Some go so far as to bundle it with some cheap gadget so that they can claim that the windows is a gift and you pay for the gadget.

No Biggie, though. Pay $200 for Windows if you want. -dok

SanduneCC
06-09-2007, 06:48
Originally posted by slewfoot
One quick way to find out if you bought a pirate copy. Go to Windows update and try to update your OS. They will either tell you to activate the copy of the OS or they will flat out reject your update and offer to sell you an activation number.

OK, I just updated the OS. It didn't reject me or ask me to activate either. I must be good to go then. :)

Patrick Graham
06-09-2007, 15:27
Originally posted by SanduneCC
OK, I just updated the OS. It didn't reject me or ask me to activate either. I must be good to go then. :)

That's Corporate.. :thumbsup:

SanduneCC
06-09-2007, 15:46
I bought it for $85 from an outfit called JoMart Sales from Pricegrabber if anyone is interested.