Emergency cat 5 crimp? [Archive] - Glock Talk

PDA

View Full Version : Emergency cat 5 crimp?


pangris
06-16-2007, 20:06
Greetings all. I've got a situation where I *need* to repair a 50 foot cat 5 cable - went out and bought a $70 crimping tool, with a picture of a cable and cat 5 head being crimped on the fron of the package, and it crimps... jacks.

SO.

Is it possible to manually wire a cat 5 head with say, a knife and a jewelers screwdriver? If so, detailed description would be great as I've never crimped anything like this before...

Muchas gracias!

Blitzer
06-16-2007, 20:47
You are

http://i199.photobucket.com/albums/aa288/Blitzer0101/screwed.jpg

1) Unless you can trim all the wires to the same length

2) Put the plug in a small vice crip connector up

3) Place wires in the plug

4) Use the screw driver to press the crimp bar into the wires

5) And also the press the small plastic clamp onto the leads

Deanster
06-17-2007, 13:53
The short answer is... maybe.

So here's what happens when you use a normal Ethernet crimper (not sure how much you already know, but I'm being detailed to cover all bases).

You use one cutter to remove an inch or so of outer sheath, unwind the pairs of wires up to the end of the sheath, arrange them in the correct order (from the underside of the connector, looking down at it - white/green, green, white/orange, blue, white/blue, orange, white/brown, brown), then use the cutter to trim them into an even row 1/2 inch beyond the sheath.

All this is easy, and can be done with scissors.

Then slide the wires into the the connector (as noted above, probably in a vise for this - you'll run out of fingers quickly), making sure they're both staying in the right order, and penetrating to the FULL depth of the connector, so the ends are under the metal blades at the end of the connector.

The crimper crimps two areas - the first is the rectangular indentation at the base of the connector, which crimps an angled chunk of plastic onto the sheath, to hold the connector on. This can be done with any flat-bladed screwdriver and a nice straight press from above. No sweat.

The second piece is inserting each metal blade into the wire below it, ensuring that each penetrates the wire's insulation, and makes good contact.

These blades are small, but a very fine-bladed flat screwdriver, and a solid press from above on each in turn, should work. Most designs have two prongs to the blade, so push hard on each exposed end of the blade for best results.

I've done this a few times before, and it ain't pretty, it sometimes works, and sometimes doesn't.

It's all about making solid contact with the blades - can be hard to do, and impossible without a good jeweler's style screwdriver and a vise or other strong holder.

It's usually worthwhile just to go to radio shack and buy their crappy $12 plastic crimper - MUCH more reliable, and faster, including the drive to RS.

However, it CAN be done without the crimper, it's just no fun, needs the right tools, and generates an unreliable result. I'd also replace the connector ASAP once I had a proper crimper in hand.

Good luck!

Osiris
06-17-2007, 14:41
Is this the tool:

pangris
06-17-2007, 19:33
thanks!

Deanster
06-18-2007, 17:34
did it work? inquiring minds want to know!

jtm62
06-18-2007, 18:40
Originally posted by Deanster
The short answer is... maybe.

So here's what happens when you use a normal Ethernet crimper (not sure how much you already know, but I'm being detailed to cover all bases).

You use one cutter to remove an inch or so of outer sheath, unwind the pairs of wires up to the end of the sheath, arrange them in the correct order (from the underside of the connector, looking down at it - white/green, green, white/orange, blue, white/blue, orange, white/brown, brown), then use the cutter to trim them into an even row 1/2 inch beyond the sheath.

All this is easy, and can be done with scissors.

Then slide the wires into the the connector (as noted above, probably in a vise for this - you'll run out of fingers quickly), making sure they're both staying in the right order, and penetrating to the FULL depth of the connector, so the ends are under the metal blades at the end of the connector.

The crimper crimps two areas - the first is the rectangular indentation at the base of the connector, which crimps an angled chunk of plastic onto the sheath, to hold the connector on. This can be done with any flat-bladed screwdriver and a nice straight press from above. No sweat.

The second piece is inserting each metal blade into the wire below it, ensuring that each penetrates the wire's insulation, and makes good contact.

These blades are small, but a very fine-bladed flat screwdriver, and a solid press from above on each in turn, should work. Most designs have two prongs to the blade, so push hard on each exposed end of the blade for best results.

I've done this a few times before, and it ain't pretty, it sometimes works, and sometimes doesn't.

It's all about making solid contact with the blades - can be hard to do, and impossible without a good jeweler's style screwdriver and a vise or other strong holder.

It's usually worthwhile just to go to radio shack and buy their crappy $12 plastic crimper - MUCH more reliable, and faster, including the drive to RS.

However, it CAN be done without the crimper, it's just no fun, needs the right tools, and generates an unreliable result. I'd also replace the connector ASAP once I had a proper crimper in hand.

Good luck!



Deanster... this is an amazing guide to building an ethernet cable.

However, I must say, I've have wonderous results with a wire stripper and a pair of channel locks.

First, I remove the outer covering from the cable.

Then, I untwist the pairs and place them into the proper order.

Next, I slide the connector onto the wire set, sometimes this results in a crash course in MFing 101,102,103,104 and 105; but sometimes not.

Finally, once I ensure all the wires are making excellent contact with the blades, I crimp that bad boy with a pair of channel locks. However, I must not, that by crimping with channel locks, the locking tab is effectively ruined, and no longer locks the cable to the device being attached to it

I do not do enough crimping to justify the purchase of a crimper and a broken locking tab is a small price to pay.

Pangris, I hope you fixed your problem!

Deanster
06-22-2007, 09:50
Interesting - broken locking tabs drive me nuts, because it tends to make the connector become... unconnected at awkward and surprising moments.

I'm also a little surprised (pleasantly) that you get enough penetration with the channel-lock approach - I'd always wondered about that, but hadn't tried it, so it's great info.

However, as an emergency approach, that sounds like an acceptable, and very expedient approach, that'll work in a pinch - I'm a fan!.

Thanks!

Deanster
06-22-2007, 09:53
double tap...

thonl
06-22-2007, 14:49
Originally posted by Deanster
...arrange them in the correct order (from the underside of the connector, looking down at it - white/green, green, white/orange, blue, white/blue, orange, white/brown, brown), then use the cutter to trim them into an even row 1/2 inch beyond the sheath.


Not to be nit-picky, but that is the correct order for one end of a cross over cable.

Really, all that matters if you are building short patch cables is that both ends are exactly the same, so it would work to have both ends cabled that way.

Manufactured cables normally look like the bottom at both ends, though, so if you follow the top, and your manfactured cable started as both ends as the bottom, you'll get a crossover.

http://pinouts.ru/images/utp_colors.gif

http://pinouts.ru/connectors/rj45m.gif

Crossover cables have one of each, negating the need for a hub/switch to connect 2 devices.

Deanster
06-22-2007, 20:20
OOOPS!

That's a great example of why we shouldn't do things from memory. Thanks for the correction!

And it's not nitpicky - it's a significant error in the directions. Correction much appreciated.

TheyAte
06-23-2007, 19:52
if it is emergency, splice and tape.

pangris
06-25-2007, 23:22
Bought a crimper in the end... much better to say the least.

Sincere thanks for all the help!

pangris
06-25-2007, 23:22
Bought a crimper in the end... much better to say the least.

Sincere thanks for all the help!