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duho7761
06-16-2007, 22:14
My father is a freemason, Scottish and York Rites, and he is a Kiva Shriner. Here lately, I have become curious about what Freemasons are all about. Today we had a long talk. Dad told me to read up on the internet and talk to other Masons about it.

So, Are there any Freemasons here? If so, why did you become a part of Masonry? What does being a Freemason mean to you?

I would ask that only those involved with Masonry answer this post. I know that this can be a hot-button topic. All I want is a friendly discusion, NOT a flame war!

Goose5
06-16-2007, 22:35
I am in the same boat as you. My father, brother, and grandfather are all past masters. My father was a 33 degree. I have been thinking about joining as well. Regardless of what follows. Free Masonary is all about self improvement.

davis513
06-16-2007, 23:08
I found some interesting information on the Wikipedia site on Freemasonry regarding some of the history, etc of Freemasonry. Like you I have known friends that are Freemasons and was interested.

Check out the following link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freemasonry

PeterJasonMN
06-16-2007, 23:43
http://glocktalk.com/forumdisplay.php?s=&forumid=192.

USMC79to83
06-17-2007, 09:14
Originally posted by PeterJasonMN
http://glocktalk.com/forumdisplay.php?s=&forumid=192.

Thanks for posting this.

mike91-G23
06-17-2007, 09:54
Cult.

Trademark
06-17-2007, 10:18
If your father and/or Grandfather were in the lodge you are known as a "Lewis". This makes it much easier. There isn't a vote on you in most jurisdictions.
Sit and talk with a MM. See if it's for you.

JimmyD
06-17-2007, 14:54
Originally posted by duho7761
What does being a Freemason mean to you?


Better than having to pay, I guess! :thumbsup:

Zero_G
06-17-2007, 17:43
The website http://www.masonicinfo.com/ has a ton of info, mostly discussing the objections to Freemasonry.

Freemasonry is not a secret society, not a religion, not a cult. It is a fraternal organization seeking to 'make good men better'.

Keith

9L82
06-17-2007, 18:15
My father is a Master Mason, Scottish Rite and York Rite. I joined 3 years ago. Due to my work schedule, I rarely get to attend. The people I have met who are involved are the kindest, most decent men I have ever met. They are the kind of men you would trust with your life. It is not a cult or a secret society. It is a fraternity based on a rich history. You will not be sorry you became involved.

Faulkner
06-17-2007, 18:56
Originally posted by mike91-G23
Cult.

I don't think it's a cult, but I do happen to be anti-freemason. (No flame intended, just wanted to note that there are those of us who do not think it's a good thing.)

9L82
06-17-2007, 20:00
Originally posted by Faulkner
I don't think it's a cult, but I do happen to be anti-freemason. (No flame intended, just wanted to note that there are those of us who do not think it's a good thing.)

Why?

HEMI 27
06-17-2007, 20:10
My grandfather is a Freemason. He always has a ring on with the symbol on it. Never really asked him to much about it though.

It is intriguing and my grandfather has been a real role model in my life so the masons cant be too bad. I should ask him more about this before he passes (congested heart failure) due to his health.

G27Chief
06-17-2007, 20:23
Other than being a long time family tradition, it feels great to be a brother to so many "whp ahve traveled this way before"

major
06-17-2007, 20:29
Originally posted by Faulkner
I don't think it's a cult, but I do happen to be anti-freemason. (No flame intended, just wanted to note that there are those of us who do not think it's a good thing.)

Same here. I am anti-mason because of some of the things I have read about their beliefs. FWIW, my Dad was one and was active and a very good, decent man. However, I want no part of them. But to each his own. I am not trying to flame anyone here.

Dustwallow
06-17-2007, 20:40
I am not really anti-mason, I mean I have nothing against them but I will never join. I mean it seems weird for that many men to "hang out" so much and have so many "rituals"

FWIW I really think the mormon church is more of a cult than the masons.

DScottHewitt
06-17-2007, 21:14
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n-cCfZrkCFI



Scott

md2lgyk
06-18-2007, 09:52
This says all I need to know:

"Freemasonry is incompatible with the Catholic faith. Freemasonry teaches a naturalistic religion that espouses indifferentism, the position that a person can be equally pleasing to God while remaining in any religion.

Masonry is a parallel religion to Christianity. The <New Catholic Encyclopedia> states, "Freemasonry displays all the elements of religion, and as such it becomes a rival to the religion of the Gospel. It includes temples and altars, prayers, a moral code, worship, vestments, feast days, the promise of reward and punishment in the afterlife, a hierarchy, and initiative and burial rites" (vol. 6, p. 137).

Masonry is also a secret society. Its initiates subscribe to secret blood oaths that are contrary to Christian morals. The prospective Mason swears that if he ever reveals the secrets of Masonry--secrets which are trivial and already well-known--he wills to be subject to self-mutilation or to gruesome execution. (Most Masons, admittedly, never would dream of carrying out these punishments on themselves or on an errant member).

Historically, one of Masonry's primary objectives has been the destruction of the Catholic Church; this is especially true of Freemasonry as it has existed in certain European countries. In the United States, Freemasonry is often little more than a social club, but it still espouses a naturalistic religion that contradicts orthodox Christianity. (Those interested in joining a men's club should consider the Knights of Columbus instead.)

The Church has imposed the penalty of excommunication on Catholics who become Freemasons. The penalty of excommunication for joining the Masonic Lodge was explicit in the 1917 code of canon law (canon 2335), and it is implicit in the 1983 code (canon 1374).

Because the revised code of canon law is not explicit on this point, some drew the mistaken conclusion that the Church's prohibition of Freemasonry had been dropped. As a result of this confusion, shortly before the 1983 code was promulgated, the Sacred Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith issued a statement indicating that the penalty was still in force. This statement was dated November 26, 1983 and may be found in <Origins> 13/27 (Nov. 15, 1983), 450."

Copyright (c) 1993 Catholic Answers. Reprinted with permission from the June 1993 issue of ****is Rock> magazine.

Kingslayer
06-18-2007, 10:48
Originally posted by md2lgyk
This says all I need to know:

"Freemasonry is incompatible with the Catholic faith. Freemasonry teaches a naturalistic religion that espouses indifferentism, the position that a person can be equally pleasing to God while remaining in any religion.

Masonry is a parallel religion to Christianity. The <New Catholic Encyclopedia> states, "Freemasonry displays all the elements of religion, and as such it becomes a rival to the religion of the Gospel. It includes temples and altars, prayers, a moral code, worship, vestments, feast days, the promise of reward and punishment in the afterlife, a hierarchy, and initiative and burial rites" (vol. 6, p. 137).

Masonry is also a secret society. Its initiates subscribe to secret blood oaths that are contrary to Christian morals. The prospective Mason swears that if he ever reveals the secrets of Masonry--secrets which are trivial and already well-known--he wills to be subject to self-mutilation or to gruesome execution. (Most Masons, admittedly, never would dream of carrying out these punishments on themselves or on an errant member).

Historically, one of Masonry's primary objectives has been the destruction of the Catholic Church; this is especially true of Freemasonry as it has existed in certain European countries. In the United States, Freemasonry is often little more than a social club, but it still espouses a naturalistic religion that contradicts orthodox Christianity. (Those interested in joining a men's club should consider the Knights of Columbus instead.)

The Church has imposed the penalty of excommunication on Catholics who become Freemasons. The penalty of excommunication for joining the Masonic Lodge was explicit in the 1917 code of canon law (canon 2335), and it is implicit in the 1983 code (canon 1374).

Because the revised code of canon law is not explicit on this point, some drew the mistaken conclusion that the Church's prohibition of Freemasonry had been dropped. As a result of this confusion, shortly before the 1983 code was promulgated, the Sacred Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith issued a statement indicating that the penalty was still in force. This statement was dated November 26, 1983 and may be found in <Origins> 13/27 (Nov. 15, 1983), 450."

Copyright (c) 1993 Catholic Answers. Reprinted with permission from the June 1993 issue of ****is Rock> magazine.

Hold on.

You took a Catholic biased (read the copyright) explanation of what FreeMasons are? And that's good enough for you? When I grow up, I want an open mind, just like you!

FreeMasons are just another way for men to get away from their nagging wives. Just like the Eagles, Elks, KofC, etc.

9L82
06-18-2007, 12:32
The only requirement is that you have a belief in God. Beyond this, any discussion of religion is expressly prohibited because it may cause turmoil among brothers.

Masons spend millions of dollars doing God's work. The Shriner's, all Master Masons, run hospitals for children...free of charge. They operate literacy centers and dyslexia treatment centers. They donate millions of dollars to charity and serve in the highest ranks of government and society.

They have seemed to avoid the many embarassments that the Catholic religion had and continues to have. I am a religious person who believes in God. Instead of relying on a religion who is threatened by people not joing the Knights of Columbus ( a catholic organization, I joined the Masonic Lodge and educated myself.

I am quite satisfied that God smiles down on the acts of my brother Masons. Quit letting people tell you how to believe. If you choose not to join or appreciate what the Mason have to offer, fine. But be honest and admit you are ignorant of their purpose.

El Duderino
06-18-2007, 12:37
Originally posted by md2lgyk
This says all I need to know:


.....



Yeah me too!


If the catholics are against it then I'm all for it!


:supergrin:

Duncan223
06-18-2007, 12:58
All your questions about the Masonic Lodge should be answered at the Glock Talk Freemasonry Forum (http://glocktalk.com/forumdisplay.php?s=&forumid=192) - I just posted some stuff for you.

Mrs. VR
06-18-2007, 13:02
Originally posted by Duncan223
All your questions about the Masonic Lodge should be answered at the Glock Talk Freemasonry Forum (http://glocktalk.com/forumdisplay.php?s=&forumid=192) - I just posted some stuff for you. yeah, I think Im gonna go ahead and move this to the forum now. :thumbsup:

Fernman
06-18-2007, 13:11
Seems like this thread went downhill fast. I especially enjoy how the OP asked politely for only those involved in Freemasonry reply, yet the "anti-masons" have been the cheif posters.

FWIW, the catholic church lifted its sanction on catholics joining freemasonry. However, I can assure you, if you are basing your decision and/or opinions of Freemasonry on a sordid past, you don't need to look beyond the catholic church to find one.

To the OP: What questions do you have?

zoyter2
06-18-2007, 13:29
Originally posted by Trademark
If your father and/or Grandfather were in the lodge you are known as a "Lewis". This makes it much easier. There isn't a vote on you in most jurisdictions.
Sit and talk with a MM. See if it's for you.

Things vary from Jurisdiction to Jurisdiction. I am a 32 degree Mason in Anniston, Alabama, and have never heard of a "Lewis" and you MUST voted (balloted) on to be initiated an Entered Apprentice.

OPer, if you have ANY questions, please ask, and I will tell you ANYTHING you ask unless the answer would allow you to "represent yourself as a Mason".

If you feel uncomfortable in a public forum, you may PM me, for my cell number, or give me yours and I will call you.

Masonry is not a "secret" society, but a society with "secrets".

BTW, I have been on GT for some years, and this is the FIRST time I knew this thread existed. I found it from a moved link. :thumbsup:

grecco
06-18-2007, 13:37
Originally posted by mike91-G23
Cult.



you are clueless,,,:)

but seriously,
ask one to be one.
its a world wide fraternity.

CBDAVIS
06-18-2007, 13:56
I'm a member of the Blue Lodge, in other words, a Master Mason. I have a perpetual membership. Also, a York Rite mason.

To answer part of your question. I wanted to be a Master Mason from childhood. Not sure why, just did.

Call the local lodge and someone will be glad to talk to you.

Raoul Duke
06-18-2007, 14:16
Originally posted by 9L82

Masons spend millions of dollars doing God's work. The Shriner's, all Master Masons, run hospitals for children...free of charge.


+1 on the Shriner's. Several years back one of my daughters suffered a fairly serious burn on her hand. The local hospital wasn't equipped to treat it properly, so they sent us to the Shriner's Hospital which specializes in treating pediatric burn victims. Not only did she receive state of the art treatment, they never even asked us for a penny. If you look at her hand now you can't even tell she was ever burned.

Every time I run into any Shriners I always tell them my story and how much I appreciate what they do for children.

Fernman
06-18-2007, 14:32
Originally posted by Raoul Duke
+1 on the Shriner's. Several years back one of my daughters suffered a fairly serious burn on her hand. The local hospital wasn't equipped to treat it properly, so they sent us to the Shriner's Hospital which specializes in treating pediatric burn victims. Not only did she receive state of the art treatment, they never even asked us for a penny. If you look at her hand now you can't even tell she was ever burned.

Every time I run into any Shriners I always tell them my story and how much I appreciate what they do for children.

:) Makes me smile :)

There is a member of GT who was very sick as a child and received the same treatment from a Shriners hospital. I should have noted his name.

JayPap
06-18-2007, 19:39
To answer the op original question.

I joined to become a Shriner.

I worked at one of thier hospitals from eighteen to twenty one years old, saw the work they did and knew someday I would join.

Unfortunatly, I waited to join until I was thirty five.

Now, I was just elected Senior Warden of my Lodge, and have had the pleasure of making friends with men I would have never met.

I am a member of my Blue Lodge, York Rite, Scottish Rite, Shrine and I am Catholic.

Read the history on King Phillip of France and Pope Leo and you will know why the church was against Masons.

9L82
06-18-2007, 23:12
Originally posted by Raoul Duke
+1 on the Shriner's. Several years back one of my daughters suffered a fairly serious burn on her hand. The local hospital wasn't equipped to treat it properly, so they sent us to the Shriner's Hospital which specializes in treating pediatric burn victims. Not only did she receive state of the art treatment, they never even asked us for a penny. If you look at her hand now you can't even tell she was ever burned.

Every time I run into any Shriners I always tell them my story and how much I appreciate what they do for children.

God bless your daughter. I am very happy to hear my dues went to making her life better.

Raoul Duke
06-19-2007, 03:23
Originally posted by 9L82
God bless your daughter. I am very happy to hear my dues went to making her life better.

Thank you VERY much. You have no idea now much I appreciate what you guys did for my little girl and for the thousands of children you take care of every year. You guys are the BEST.

Thanks again. :)

bno762
07-01-2007, 11:53
duho- I just read this thread and am wondering if you ever got any help with your search. If not or if you could use more info pm me. I have a copy of "Free Masonry for dummies" and would be happy to send it to you. Also I am relatively new to the masons but I can tell you that you won't regret joining.

machinisttx
07-01-2007, 22:19
Originally posted by md2lgyk
This says all I need to know:

"Freemasonry is incompatible with the Catholic faith. Freemasonry teaches a naturalistic religion that espouses indifferentism, the position that a person can be equally pleasing to God while remaining in any religion.

Masonry is a parallel religion to Christianity. The <New Catholic Encyclopedia> states, "Freemasonry displays all the elements of religion, and as such it becomes a rival to the religion of the Gospel. It includes temples and altars, prayers, a moral code, worship, vestments, feast days, the promise of reward and punishment in the afterlife, a hierarchy, and initiative and burial rites" (vol. 6, p. 137).

Masonry is also a secret society. Its initiates subscribe to secret blood oaths that are contrary to Christian morals. The prospective Mason swears that if he ever reveals the secrets of Masonry--secrets which are trivial and already well-known--he wills to be subject to self-mutilation or to gruesome execution. (Most Masons, admittedly, never would dream of carrying out these punishments on themselves or on an errant member).

Historically, one of Masonry's primary objectives has been the destruction of the Catholic Church; this is especially true of Freemasonry as it has existed in certain European countries. In the United States, Freemasonry is often little more than a social club, but it still espouses a naturalistic religion that contradicts orthodox Christianity. (Those interested in joining a men's club should consider the Knights of Columbus instead.)

The Church has imposed the penalty of excommunication on Catholics who become Freemasons. The penalty of excommunication for joining the Masonic Lodge was explicit in the 1917 code of canon law (canon 2335), and it is implicit in the 1983 code (canon 1374).

Because the revised code of canon law is not explicit on this point, some drew the mistaken conclusion that the Church's prohibition of Freemasonry had been dropped. As a result of this confusion, shortly before the 1983 code was promulgated, the Sacred Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith issued a statement indicating that the penalty was still in force. This statement was dated November 26, 1983 and may be found in <Origins> 13/27 (Nov. 15, 1983), 450."

Copyright (c) 1993 Catholic Answers. Reprinted with permission from the June 1993 issue of ****is Rock> magazine.


Mmmmmkaaayyyy. I've seen and heard all the "Freemasonry is a religion" propaganda now. You know what's really funny? The Knights of Columbus hall is right next door to my lodge :tongueout: . As a matter of fact, my lodge works with the KoC on several things. IMHO, "the church" doesn't like Masonry because they don't make any money off of it.

Just for giggles, taken from my Monitor of the Lodge andwritten in plain english .

The Furniture of a Lodge is the Holy Bible, Square, and Compasses. The Holy Bible is dedicated to God, because it is the inestimable gift of God to man; the Square to the Master, because it is the proper Masonic emblem of his office; and the Compasses to the Craft, because, by due attention to their use, they are taught to circumscribe their desires and keep their passions within due bounds.

Also taken from my Monitor and written in plain english

(snip to ending of lambskin apron presentation cause I'm not going to type for 30 minutes)

Then, when at last, your weary feet shall have come to the end of life's toilsome journey, and from your nerveless grasp, shall drop, forever, the working tools of life, may the record of your life and actions be as pure and spotless as this Apron now is; and when your soul, freed from earth, shall stand naked and alone before the Great White Throne, may it be your portion to hear from Him who sits thereon, the welcome plaudit: "Well done, thou good and faithful servant! Enter thou into the joy of thy Lord!"

Again, taken from my Monitor and written in plain english

Bible Presentation
My brother, however men may differ in creed or theology, all good men are agreed that within the covers of the Holy Bible are found those principles of morality which lay the foundation pon which to build a righteous life.

Masonry, therefore, opens this book upon its altar with a command to each of its members that he diligently study therein to learn the way to Eternal Life. Adopting no particular creed, forbidding all sectarian discussion within its Lodgerooms, but urging each to be steadfast in the faith of his profession, Masonry would take every good man by the hand, lead him to the altar, point to the open Bible thereon, and urge that he direct his way through life by the light he there shall find; and so long as that light shines upon its altar, so long as it illuminates the pathway of the Craftsmen by its golden rays of truth, so long will Freemasonry live and shed its beneficent influence upon mankind.

Guard then, my brother, that Book of sacred and immutable Law as you guard your life; defend it more heroically than you would the flag of your country, and live by its Divine precepts with its everlasting assurances of a blessed immortality.

On behalf of your Lodge, it is my great privilege to present to you, your own personal copy of the Great Light in Masonry. Read it, study it, and implement in your daily life the precepts contained in it. By so doing, you will merit the title bestowed upon you tonight-that of a Master Mason.

The above was said to me when I was presented with MY PERSONAL copy of the EXACT SAME BOOK that sits upon the altar of my Lodge. It can be found here http://www.tias.com/cgi-bin/google.fcgi/itemKey=1922827435

Or my personal copy which was sitting beside my bed until I went and got it for this picture.

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b20/imakechips/102_0671.jpg

hiram2005p0
07-17-2007, 09:06
I'm a Master Mason, HInkle Lodge #310. I was told when we run into people who have no idea what they are talking about in regards to Freemasonry,and they don't want to listen to the truth, to put a smile on your face and go on. That way we don't lower ourselves to that level by arguing with them. By doing this ,we better men remain so. :) :) :)

Fernman
07-17-2007, 09:30
Originally posted by hiram2005p0
I'm a Master Mason, HInkle Lodge #310. I was told when we run into people who have no idea what they are talking about in regards to Freemasonry,and they don't want to listen to the truth, to put a smile on your face and go on. That way we don't lower ourselves to that level by arguing with them. By doing this ,we better men remain so. :) :) :)

Greetings Hiram, I like your policy about arguing... it just isn't worth it. We put factoids in our newsletter about the origins and meaning of freemasonry that are commonly misconceived, to foster conversation with others, which has gone a long way to have the community embrace us :)

:wavey:

nursetim
07-17-2007, 09:36
Sorry to hijack your thread OP. If I want to join, does it matter that my Great-grandfather and /or grandfather were masons?

Fernman
07-17-2007, 09:41
Originally posted by nursetim
Sorry to hijack your thread OP. If I want to join, does it matter that my Great-grandfather and /or grandfather were masons?

It does not "matter" per say, each man is judged on his own credibility and merit. But a good family is never a bad thing. Look up your local Lodge, should be in the phonebook, and drop them a line. They'll answer any questions you may have :) HTH

hiram2005p0
07-17-2007, 09:47
Originally posted by nursetim
Sorry to hijack your thread OP. If I want to join, does it matter that my Great-grandfather and /or grandfather were masons? Just speaking for our Lodge,if that is the case it helps in that we would probably know your relatives and then we would know something of you in advance. However we do check out our new petitioners before we accept them and we have some who have no one who was a Mason in their family. We look for good character then make them better. You should put in a petition at a Lodge close to you or one where your Grandfathers were at if that is feasible.:) :) :)

duho7761
07-17-2007, 20:20
I just finished reading and studying "Freemasons for Dummies." I have had many talks with my dad, 32nd degree as well as all 10 of the York Rite. He and I are making preparations for me to join. I look forward to the fellowship and learning more of the Lodge's history. Also, I think this will be a good way for dad and I to bond.

I thank all of you for posting, even the negative posts. All POV should be welcomed. Too often we surround ourselves with people who think just as we do. It seems that people are scared to have serious conversations about thier core beliefs. Maybe we are afraid we'll offend someone with all the PC madness about. Maybe we're just insecure.

I believe the author of Proverbs said it best "Iron sharpeneth iron, so a man sharpeneth the countenance of his friend." Proverbs 27:17. Sometimes we NEED to grate against each other to sharpen our understanding of the world and even God.

That said, I feel that I've developed some new friendships here in this forum. Again, thanks to ALL.

Fernman
07-17-2007, 20:35
:goodpost:

:grouphug:

mmaci
08-08-2007, 08:46
Benjamin Franklin (a quintessential American) was a Freemason, as were a number of the founding fathers.

That says enough for me:thumbsup:

machinisttx
08-10-2007, 18:10
Originally posted by mmaci
Benjamin Franklin (a quintessential American) was a Freemason, as were a number of the founding fathers.

That says enough for me:thumbsup:

So were Audie Murphy, John Wayne, Hap Arnold, and a whole bunch of other famous folks. ;)

jrr6602
08-11-2007, 05:53
Most of the signers of the Declaration of Independence were Masons. Most of the particapants in the Boston Tea Party, The Sons of Liberty. George S Patton and several of the Presidents of the United States, most recently Harry S. Truman and Gerald Ford. Several of the men at the Alamo. The Grand Lodge of Texas has erected a plaque on the Long Barracks building. During our celebration of Texas Independence, a Master Mason degree is confered.

machinisttx
08-12-2007, 14:46
Only 11 or 13(can't remember which) can be proven to have been Freemasons. There are a couple which may have been masons, but no conclusive evidence has been found.

Garrett Smith
08-12-2007, 15:06
So do I understand it correctly that Shriners are Freemasons?

bno762
08-12-2007, 18:10
yes

Hoppes No.9
08-16-2007, 15:18
*******Hijack on*******

I've been thinking of joining. What exactly goes on at the lodge meetings? Do you talk about the days events, sports, the war, etc.??????

******Hijack o**********************

zoyter2
08-16-2007, 17:27
Originally posted by Hoppes No.9
*******Hijack on*******

I've been thinking of joining. What exactly goes on at the lodge meetings? Do you talk about the days events, sports, the war, etc.??????

******Hijack o**********************

Usually, during the Lodge meeting or "communications" itself, we conduct only pertinent business dealing with Masonry itself. After or before the actual "communications' we are pretty much like virtually any other group of guys. We discuss pretty much everything. The difference is that we seldom discuss anything that can cause someone to get upset. If the discussion turns to politics, you can count on the conversation to remain civil or be over.

glockess56
09-08-2007, 00:10
My dad and grandfather (mother's dad) were both Free Masons, plus a great uncle was a Master of a lodge and I had another great uncle in, also, and I respect them. I myself was in Job's Daughters, which are for girls affiliated with Master Masons. My mother and grandmother were in Order of Eastern Star (OES). Many people misunderstand Free Masontry and that's a shame, because they are good people. When my grandfather and dad died, the ceremony they have at the funeral home is awesome and very comforting. It gave me a lot of peace.

Recently, I saw on either the Discovery channel or History channel a segment on the history of the Free Masons. I missed the first hour of it and there were still two hours left! They explained when it started, myths and how some of the myths started and different people (presidents, famous people, etc.) who were Masons. They even showed an initiation ceremony, first time on TV! They even showed, which I didn't know, a woman who was the Master of a lodge. I didn't even know they let women join, but I guess this is something new. It really answered a lot of questions anyone would have about the Masons. Free Masons are wonderful people, so keep up the good work.

PS All this is coming from a Catholic, mind you!

zoyter2
09-08-2007, 08:50
Hey Glockess! You obviously come from a good family! :thumbsup:

I did not catch the DC special on Masonry. I usually tend to watch those type things finding them to be either very informative or hysterically funny. The DC has had a couple of shorter stories about Masonry that were really good, and surprisingly accurate.

As far as I know, women are not allowed to be Masons in any jurisdiction in the world. I have never heard of this at any rate. There is one documented case of a woman being made a Mason. It seems that she was hiding her gender, and was initiated, passed and raised before being found out. The lodge decided that it was best to keep her in the lodge, under her obligation, than to kick her out. This was in the late 1800s or early 1900s IIRC.

Remember that, unfortunately, anyone in the world can hang a "Square and compasses" on the side of a building, and call themselves Masonry. But many that do so act and conduct their lodge in ways contradictory to the true "Ancient and accepted Landmarks of Masonry".

Glockcula
09-08-2007, 10:26
Good morning Brothers and Sisters of the Masonic Fraternity.I will try to post a link to Brother Paul Bessels web site,which has enough information to keep us all reading for a long time.Yes there is a section on Women in Masonary near the end.Hope the link works or Goggle Paul Bessel Masonic Web site.

http://bessel.org/webindex.htm

Fraternaly
WB Dave Wipfler
Omaha,Nebr.

gashog99
10-05-2007, 20:24
Originally posted by mmaci
Benjamin Franklin (a quintessential American) was a Freemason, as were a number of the founding fathers.

That says enough for me:thumbsup: Originally posted by machinisttx
So were Audie Murphy, John Wayne, Hap Arnold, and a whole bunch of other famous folks. ;) Here's a pretty impressive list of Famous Freemasons from Past Master "Duncan223":

GlockTalk - Famous Freemasons 1 (http://www.glocktalk.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=716435)
GlockTalk - Famous Freemasons 2 (http://www.glocktalk.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=716436)