New Server Specs [Archive] - Glock Talk

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havensal
07-26-2007, 09:37
I think I have the specs finalized for our new server. If you can offer any suggestions I would appreciate them. This is my first server setup and I am a little nervous. This is the same server as the other posts. This is just a data server that is also out DHCP / domain controller. The only thing I really think I needed to boost was the HD's and NIC. I didn't think the benefits of going from 10K drives to 15K drives would outweigh the costs. As for the NIC, I have been told that as long as it is a Gigibit card, it will be as fast as any other. Also I am having them partition the HD with an OS partition and a data partition. Thanks.

Base Unit:
Dual Core Xeon Processor 5120 4MB Cache, 1.86 GHz, 1066MHz FSB, PE1900 (222-5260)

Processor:
Information,No Second Processor (311-1193)

Memory:
2GB 667MHz (4X512MB), Single Ranked DIMMs (311-6153)

Hard Drive:
146GB 10K RPM Serial-Attach SCSI 3Gbps 3.5-in Cabled Hard Drive (341-4024)

Additional Storage Products:
146GB 10K RPM Serial-Attach SCSI 3Gbps 3.5-in Cabled Hard Drive (341-4024)

Misc:
146GB 10K RPM Serial-Attach SCSI 3Gbps 3.5-in Cabled Hard Drive (341-4024)

Hard Drive Controller:
PERC 5/i, Integrated Controller Card (341-3018)

Operating System:
Microsoft Small Business Server 2003 R2, Standard Edition (420-6266)

NIC:
Broadcom NetXtreme 5721 SinglePort Gigabit Ethernet NIC, Cu PCIe x1 (430-1496)

TBU:
PowerVault 100T, DAT72 Tape Backup, 36/72GB, w/Controller Internal for PowerEdge 2900 (341-3050)

CD-ROM or DVD-ROM Drive:
48X IDE CD-RW/DVD ROM Drive for PowerEdge 2900/1900 (313-4571)

Documentation Diskette:
Electronic Documentation and OpenManage CD Kit, PE1900 (310-8292)

Factory Installed Software:
Yosemite Backup SBS (420-5637)

Feature
Integrated SAS/SATA RAID 5 PERC 5/i Integrated (341-4020)

Singlemalt
07-26-2007, 12:18
Unless it is a budget issue, go dual processor.

what types of data are you referring to? Is this a traditional file server or data in form of DB's?

havensal
07-26-2007, 12:31
It's basically just a file server. Some of our accounting software is in DB form, but applications are run locally. As for the Dual processor, it would be a waist of money, there are no real applications running on the server to process, just data throughput. ;)

tous
07-27-2007, 06:46
Get dual NICs is you can.

You're upgrade future is sort of limited with the 1066 FSB. If you plan on keeping this box awhile, I'd go with a 1333 FSB. You can put some pretty manly procs in it then.

You do know, 1000BaseT means that all of your DCE has to be Gigibit capable, right? Also, you'll need Cat5e or Cat6 cabling.

Don't buy the 4x512 DIMMS if you can help it. If you need to upgrade memory, you basically throw them away.

You gonna do RAID 5+?

havensal
07-27-2007, 08:05
Originally posted by tous
Get dual NICs is you can.

You're upgrade future is sort of limited with the 1066 FSB. If you plan on keeping this box awhile, I'd go with a 1333 FSB. You can put some pretty manly procs in it then.

You do know, 1000BaseT means that all of your DCE has to be Gigibit capable, right? Also, you'll need Cat5e or Cat6 cabling.

Don't buy the 4x512 DIMMS if you can help it. If you need to upgrade memory, you basically throw them away.

You gonna do RAID 5+?

Good catch on the ram. I asked to two 1 gig sticks.

As for the 1000BaseT DCE, Que? I assume you mean the switches between the server and workstations (we don't use routers).:)

tous
07-28-2007, 07:05
Originally posted by havensal
Good catch on the ram. I asked to two 1 gig sticks.

As for the 1000BaseT DCE, Que? I assume you mean the switches between the server and workstations (we don't use routers).:)



Yup. DCE are the boxes with blinky lights that all of the cables plug in to and out of. :supergrin:

DCE has had a number of definitions: Data Communication Equipment, Data Circuit-terminating Equipment, Damned Crashing Equipment, etc.

:wavey:

Is this a small LAN with a gateway to the internets?

WhatYouWant
07-28-2007, 12:04
Originally posted by Singlemalt
Unless it is a budget issue, go dual processor.

I agree with this statement. I had a server that had a processor DIE and it still worked until I could get it replaced.

I would also do 4 GB memory (does not hurt to have this). What limits on memory does SBS have?

I would get the 4x73 drives instead of 3x146 (however, if you have that much data stay with the 146s). I would prefer to have an individual server for the file storage. You could use DAS to increase the space available (simple w/ 15x73 drives @ 15k is about 7500).

And, if you have that much data stay at at your 146 drives but if you have not nearly that much do the 73 drives and you can get 4 for about the same price as 3. If you need to increase storage space in the future then you can get a DAS for the server (my preference is an INDIVIDUAL server for file storage).

Get more than one NIC.

Ensure that you have GOOD support from the company. Nothing like having to wait until MONDAY when the server breaks Friday and you need it back Saturday.

jeanjvr
07-31-2007, 15:41
I see you don't have a UPS on that list.

havensal
08-01-2007, 10:17
Originally posted by jeanjvr
I see you don't have a UPS on that list.

Already have one. APC UPS (http://www.apc.com/resource/include/techspec_index.cfm?base_sku=SUA1000)
;)

jeanjvr
08-01-2007, 11:27
Originally posted by havensal
Already have one. APC UPS (http://www.apc.com/resource/include/techspec_index.cfm?base_sku=SUA1000)
;)


Good. Thats one thing every server\important workstation should have!

tous,

I doubt that the processor would be upgraded seperately in a server setup. Would be better to just go for two sockets upfront if neccesary.

The servers where I work just get replaced completely every few years or Ram added. I just resurected one of the old netware servers for use elsewhere (stil has 6 nice scsi disks)

Deanster
08-01-2007, 18:55
My only question is why the SCSI disks?

Nothing wrong with them, but these days SATA is so ubiquitous and fast that it seems like SCSI is mostly a way to spend more money, except for folks who have one of the applications where SCSI's on-board processor really makes a difference.

Here's an article on SATA vs. SCSI that does a good job of highlighting the differences. They especially note that if your motherboard supports SATA NCQ (Native Command Queuing), they've found that SATA 10K rpm drives are often faster than SCSI 15K rpm drives.

http://www.pugetsystems.com/articles.php?id=19

Just a thought.