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MissAmericanPie
07-29-2007, 22:58
:wavey: I'm new to this forum, though I post in CT often. I have a request for you guys, if you do not mind.

I just lost a job "opportunity" for a nice safe position with regular hours and good benefits and I told myself that if I didn't get it, I was going to start EMT training because EMS is what I really want to do.

So, if you were going to try to talk someone out of it, what would you say to him? I need to hear all of the things I don't want to hear so I know I'm ready to jump into it headlong.

Fire away and thanks. :)

sixer
07-30-2007, 07:33
Originally posted by MissAmericanPie
:wavey: I'm new to this forum, though I post in CT often. I have a request for you guys, if you do not mind.

I just lost a job "opportunity" for a nice safe position with regular hours and good benefits and I told myself that if I didn't get it, I was going to start EMT training because EMS is what I really want to do.

So, if you were going to try to talk someone out of it, what would you say to him? I need to hear all of the things I don't want to hear so I know I'm ready to jump into it headlong.

Fire away and thanks. :)

My advice is do it. I've been working in EMS for about 9 months and I love it. I can't imagine myself doing anything else at this point. Theres sometimes days(or nights) that the job sucks, but it only takes one person saying thank you or just knowing I helped someone make up for it. I'm saving up the money for Paramedic school right now. Good Luck.

RyanNREMTP
07-30-2007, 08:26
You want some cons? Majority of the calls are patients that are very stable and usually nothing happens. Patients will call for stupid things and do stupid things so don't say stupid things to the patient. Pay isn't that great compared to other fields. Bring an extra set of uniforms for your shift. There are several others but since I didn't get any sleep last night while on duty I can't think of much else.

Other than that it's a great job and I still love it after 12 years.

sixer
07-30-2007, 10:26
Originally posted by RyanNREMTP
You want some cons? Majority of the calls are patients that are very stable and usually nothing happens. Patients will call for stupid things and do stupid things so don't say stupid things to the patient. Pay isn't that great compared to other fields. Bring an extra set of uniforms for your shift. There are several others but since I didn't get any sleep last night while on duty I can't think of much else.

Other than that it's a great job and I still love it after 12 years.

A big +1 on that. The area I'm currently working in has a MAJOR problem with 911 abusers. Its a drag but when that "good call" goes out and you actually get to help someone it makes up for it. Another piece of advice I can give is try to find a company that runs 911/Fire calls, they'll pay less but you get first hand experience with the FD and their Paramedics.

MissAmericanPie
07-30-2007, 11:46
Originally posted by sixer
A big +1 on that. The area I'm currently working in has a MAJOR problem with 911 abusers. Its a drag but when that "good call" goes out and you actually get to help someone it makes up for it. Another piece of advice I can give is try to find a company that runs 911/Fire calls, they'll pay less but you get first hand experience with the FD and their Paramedics.

I'm calling the FD today since they are desperate for EMT volunteers. I was talking with one of our firefighters last night and he said that the dept. will reimburse me for a portion of the training costs, as well. That is a nice little perk, but I'm doing it anyway. I hope the dept. will take me since they vote on it.

Also, he was telling me about 911 abuse calls. One woman calls for ridiculous things such as band-aids!!

The nice thing is that the school that comes to me highly recommended (SOLO) is five minutes from my house. They offer community courses so as soon as one is available, I'm starting. I know several people who are EMT/Firefighters and not one person would do anything else. Everyone who does it seems to love it, even with the hardships that accompany it.

Thanks so much for the responses.

sixer
07-30-2007, 12:13
Originally posted by MissAmericanPie
I'm calling the FD today since they are desperate for EMT volunteers. I was talking with one of our firefighters last night and he said that the dept. will reimburse me for a portion of the training costs, as well. That is a nice little perk, but I'm doing it anyway. I hope the dept. will take me since they vote on it.

Also, he was telling me about 911 abuse calls. One woman calls for ridiculous things such as band-aids!!

The nice thing is that the school that comes to me highly recommended (SOLO) is five minutes from my house. They offer community courses so as soon as one is available, I'm starting. I know several people who are EMT/Firefighters and not one person would do anything else. Everyone who does it seems to love it, even with the hardships that accompany it.

Thanks so much for the responses.

I'd love to volunteer for one of my local FD's but their never lacking in willing volunteers. I'm on some wait list, so who knows. Speaking of 911 abusers, we had a call for an older male the other night. I can't remember what it was dispatched as but we get on scene and the guy asks one of the ff's if he could hand him a glass of water because he was too tired to get out of bed to get it. Thats why he called. We have another one, I've memorized his address so when I hear it go over the radio, we mentally get ready for a long wait at one of the local hospitals. I was talking to one of the Captains about this 911 abuser and asked him if they kept records on how many times they'd been called to that address in a year, he said 260+ times.

4095fanatic
07-31-2007, 18:12
The worst (this is how I feel on the most cynical and jaded of days):

All you are is a taxicab with a cot in the back, and you don't get tips.

You're gonna discover a bodily fluid that you can't stand, because within 6 months you'll have been exposed multiple times to every possible substance that can exit a human being (along with several that shouldn't).

Your back is gonna be torn up. Enjoy it while it lasts.

Sleep is going to be a nice memory, that you used to get "back in the day".

No one appreciates what you do for a living. You're an inconvenient box that runs ppl off the road.

People you know and love like brothers/sisters are probably going to die sometime in your career. Especially true in fire based EMS.


Having said all that, after 5 years I don't regret a thing. If you can deal with the above, good luck to ya!

hotpig
07-31-2007, 20:14
Enjoy it while your body lasts. This could be weeks or years because many people that you will have haul around will weigh more than you.

Hours are long, pay in most cases are just token. You will get minimal to no respect from others in the medical field.

Psych patients will drive you up the wall. It does not matter how many times you lecture them on the correct way to commit suicide they still just play around at hurting themselves. Bunch of losers!!

I had one in town that called us about five times each weak for the last three years for suicidal tendencies. She fell and broke her shoulder last week. The other day she accidentally OD on pain meds and died. :rofl:Poetic justice.

It is a good day when you get a bunch of real 911 calls. Its a bad day when you get stuck with a bunch of calls to those storage facilities for discarded humans ie Nursing Homes.

MissAmericanPie
07-31-2007, 23:17
Originally posted by 4095fanatic
The worst (this is how I feel on the most cynical and jaded of days):

All you are is a taxicab with a cot in the back, and you don't get tips.

You're gonna discover a bodily fluid that you can't stand, because within 6 months you'll have been exposed multiple times to every possible substance that can exit a human being (along with several that shouldn't).

Your back is gonna be torn up. Enjoy it while it lasts.

Sleep is going to be a nice memory, that you used to get "back in the day".

No one appreciates what you do for a living. You're an inconvenient box that runs ppl off the road.

People you know and love like brothers/sisters are probably going to die sometime in your career. Especially true in fire based EMS.


Having said all that, after 5 years I don't regret a thing. If you can deal with the above, good luck to ya!

I guess I have to step up the workouts.:supergrin: Know any good back exercises?;)

Ya' haven't scared me yet.:tongueout: But I truly appreciate your responses. I hope I keep getting more of this.

My class starts Sept. 9. It is Mon. through Fri. from 8:15 to 5:00. It is Wilderness EMT which is Basic EMT plus wilderness rescue. It is 161 hours (28 days). The school just plucked a heart attack victim off of a mountain today with Fish and Game and some area rescue crews. It sounds like I'll get some pretty good experience.

I just spoke to the Fire/Rescue Captain in my town today. He suggested I come to the Rescue meeting next week and fill out the volunteer paperwork and he is calling the school for me to verify that it is the appropriate course so I do not waste my money (I am certain that it is.). Damn, it is sooo expensive - $2020.:shocked:

Thanks so much for sharing your experiences.

sixer
08-01-2007, 00:20
Originally posted by MissAmericanPie
snip... Damn, it is sooo expensive - $2020.:shocked: snip...

Thanks so much for sharing your experiences.

Damn $2020, I thought I paid alot and I went to UCLA's program. Isn't there a Community College around you that offers EMT-B? I don't know about your area but $2020 sounds like alot for just EMT-B and wilderness training. lf thats the best option for you I guess you should do it. Save your money for a good Paramedic school, if you go that way.

MissAmericanPie
08-01-2007, 03:16
Originally posted by sixer
Damn $2020, I thought I paid alot and I went to UCLA's program. Isn't there a Community College around you that offers EMT-B? I don't know about your area but $2020 sounds like alot for just EMT-B and wilderness training. lf thats the best option for you I guess you should do it. Save your money for a good Paramedic school, if you go that way.

The FD has a contract with them and they said that it is really the only place within 1 1/2 hours that offers it. The captain was shocked as well, since the school usually offers "community programs" for people who live in the area and they are much cheaper - $895 or so. But they aren't offering any this year since there is a problem with simply getting instructors to teach the class at night. That program is spread out over a few months.

I'm going to go for it. The FD will give me $500 for the training. They would give me more he said but they are really strapped for cash and he said he appreciates my willingness to pay so much. But I'm just going to pay for it. My husband is fine with it. It is what it is.

The school comes highly recommended. It is called SOLO and people come from different states to attend. This is likely where I will get my "I" and my paramedic, if I like the school.

MissAmericanPie
08-01-2007, 03:29
Sixer,

What is the population of the town/city in which you work? I am wondering what the calls will be like. I have an idea with rescue, our population is about 2,000, but eventually I would like a paid job with an ambulance service (there are two in the immediate area and others with a little drive).

I know that some who have posted live in metro areas or with higher populations. The ambulance services here cover several towns, and one of them probably services a collective population of about 15,000, including the tourist population in the summer and winter.

Thanks.

hotpig
08-01-2007, 06:02
The last time that I instructed a EMT-B class the Hospital charged 550.00 and the Paramedic was 1050.00. It has been three years since I stopped teaching, I bet the price has gone up.


I know that our prices were much cheaper than the Community Collage. Training was also much better. My students could go to work as soon as their license was in hand. The Community College EMT's would have to do time orientating before they could start functioning.

RyanNREMTP
08-01-2007, 07:30
I think the local EMT class is about $400 or so and the EMT-I is just a little higher. Paramedic class when I took it was $1800. Usually this is just the class only, not books and uniforms.

My area has a population of 200,000. We cover I believe just over half of the county with the main area being 7 cities that our service has a contract with. I don't know call volume since our run numbers include all of the other counties that ETMC covers. Last year is was over 180,000 calls.

sixer
08-01-2007, 07:50
Originally posted by MissAmericanPie
Sixer,

What is the population of the town/city in which you work? I am wondering what the calls will be like. I have an idea with rescue, our population is about 2,000, but eventually I would like a paid job with an ambulance service (there are two in the immediate area and others with a little drive).

I know that some who have posted live in metro areas or with higher populations. The ambulance services here cover several towns, and one of them probably services a collective population of about 15,000, including the tourist population in the summer and winter.

Thanks.

The company I'm currently working for covers two city's in Los Angeles County and were the 911 transport and BLS provider for both city's. The population of both are in the neighborhood of 250,000. This (http://www.cpc.mednet.ucla.edu/SRRS/) is the school I went too. If SOLO is the only provider in your area and they come recommened by the FD then I doubt you can go wrong attending.

I can't speak for your area but in LA county theres three diffrent 'kind' of ambulance companies you can work for. One that only run IFT's. One that runs both 911 and IFT's. And one that only runs 911. The pay (I've looked around) is highest at the IFT only companies, and lowest at the 911 only companies. Still crap for what we all have to be exposed to and deal with.

I choose to work for a company that runs both IFT and 911. I got tired of running IFT's and moved to the other city they cover, in which they only run 911 calls along with the Fire Department. I think you'll really enjoy your time in EMS. You'll develop a strong 'taste' for dark humor and get your mental 'wall' setup to have to deal with death and the like. Good luck.

seabrookglocker
08-01-2007, 11:32
wait till you get called out at 3am, code 3, only to arrive and be asked to go pick up chicken soup for the pt. gotta love it.



not to hijack the thread, but
RyanNREMTP, do you know any basics from West?

RyanNREMTP
08-01-2007, 12:22
Originally posted by seabrookglocker
not to hijack the thread, but
RyanNREMTP, do you know any basics from West?

I know a few, I volunteer up there every third blue moon.

mylt1
08-01-2007, 12:35
this is a love/hate job. either you love it and stay with it a long time or you hate it and end the job quickly. these guys havent mentioned about how dishearting it is when you have worked a code for 30-45 min just to walk into the ER and the doc looks at you and turns to the nurse and says note the time. tells you that you did a good job and then turns and walks away without doing much of anything. they havent told you about how you never forget your first trauma code or trauma fatality. how no matter how hard you try the faces and scenes of the dead come back to haunt you time to time. they havent told you about the sleepless nights not from running calls but from not being able to get those images out of your head. or how people look at you when you did everything you could but still couldnt save there loved one.
there is a lot in this job that can kill you and i dont mean just the calls. there is a reason fire/ems/police have the highest divorce, suicide, and heart attack rates in the US. it is one of the most stressful jobs you can have. the thing is to try and forget the bad and remember that every once and a while someone will actually say thank you and actually mean it. those are the good days.

D25
08-01-2007, 12:42
Originally posted by 4095fanatic


Your back is gonna be torn up. Enjoy it while it lasts.



MEDIC= My Education Doesn't Include Carrying;)

Other than that, the big downsides have been hit on, especially the 911 abusers. A couple months ago we were dispatched to someone who had a bad dream.:upeyes:

4095fanatic
08-01-2007, 15:08
Learn to lift with your legs. This is crucial. I'd spend at least 12 hours practicing lifting a stretcher to make sure you get it right.

RLDS45S
08-01-2007, 18:14
Up here the community colleges charge nearly a grand for EMT-B. It is all on credits these days.

ABC's stand for Ambulate Before Carrying, Not Airway Breathing and Circulation.

Everyone has one good last walk left in them!

I have to laugh about not being respected. Respect is earned not demanded by a title. Having extensive EMS experience from small town BLS to urban ALS I have to say that is pretty much universal. But, it is unfortunate that other medical providers do have slighted outlook. One of the 911 providers that frequents our ER has brought in 3 misplaced ETT's since the first of the year, thus effectively killing the patient. Now that does not allow for credibility for the whole, and it really diminishes other EMS providers in the eyes of our staff. No one is perfect!

Embrace your passion!
Remember this: Dead Heroes Save No Lives!

Hunca Munca
08-07-2007, 21:56
What is the price difference between EMT-b and this wilderness thingy?

It is your money but you might find a course at a community college for less money particularly if you think you might not want a full term career in EMS.
It doesn't sound like you get any more certification than EMT-B anyway from the NREMT.

Like I said it is your money.. But that tuition sounds like an EMT-P course not EMT-B.


You can buy a great wilderness medicine textbook by Auerbach for $150.00

I was an EMT once many moons ago. I have moved onward and upward since then.

(I grew up in Hampton)

MissAmericanPie
08-09-2007, 22:08
Originally posted by Hunca Munca
What is the price difference between EMT-b and this wilderness thingy?

It is your money but you might find a course at a community college for less money particularly if you think you might not want a full term career in EMS.
It doesn't sound like you get any more certification than EMT-B anyway from the NREMT.

Like I said it is your money.. But that tuition sounds like an EMT-P course not EMT-B.


You can buy a great wilderness medicine textbook by Auerbach for $150.00

I was an EMT once many moons ago. I have moved onward and upward since then.

(I grew up in Hampton)

The Wilderness EMT course is 50 hours of wilderness training and 111 hours of EMT Basic training. The closest community college offering the course is Portland, Maine which is three hours round trip for me.

But I have decided that I am interested in the wilderness response training due to the large number of rescues that take place in the White Mountains. I live in Mount Washington Valley and it is a regular occurrance. Today, Fish and Game pulled a hiker off of a mountain after she suffered a seizure and the local rescues and ambulance services responded as well. The school that I will be attending assists in many of these rescues.

Also, I would like to advance to an EMT-I and on to Paramedic. Alot of the ambulance services around here have experienced a large increase in calls, so there may be openings in the future for me once I become an Intermediate.

The class starts Sept. 4 and runs for four weeks so when I am done I can begin volunteering for our town rescue. I went to the meeting tonight and applied. The fire captain suggested that once my testing is near, I can get support from the dept., practicing at the station with someone.

I am excited to begin. Thanks for all of the responses.

Hunca Munca
08-10-2007, 01:27
Well then good luck!

4095fanatic
08-10-2007, 09:26
Excited to begin? Oh boy, I can't wait to watch her spirit get crushed.

Lol just kidding. Glad to see you're enthusiastic about this; don't ever lose your enthusiasm and become jaded old men like us. Go to work with the attitude you're going to enjoy every day, and you probably will. :ambulance: :thumbsup:

D25
08-11-2007, 11:25
Random thoughts for MAP:

Can't you volunteer before you finish your class?

Consider skipping the Intermediate class, and go from B to Paramedic. School is good, and an extra year spent taking the I class is fine, but you don't really start figuring things out till your out in the field.

Remember this enthusiasm. In the future, it may be challenged, especially around 0300 hrs.

Good luck!:thumbsup:

MissAmericanPie
08-11-2007, 22:26
Originally posted by D25
Random thoughts for MAP:

Can't you volunteer before you finish your class?

Consider skipping the Intermediate class, and go from B to Paramedic. School is good, and an extra year spent taking the I class is fine, but you don't really start figuring things out till your out in the field.

Remember this enthusiasm. In the future, it may be challenged, especially around 0300 hrs.

Good luck!:thumbsup:

Thanks for the advice. I was unaware that I could skip the Intermediate class, thinking it would be a prerequisite for Paramedic. I'll talk to them at the school about it, and ask them for some recommendations since they do not offer it.

I will probably start volunteering at some point in the class. Once I have reached the skill level of a first responder I can go on calls with them. I'm going to the rescue meeting in two weeks and I'll get some more details.

But, I will remember this enthusiasm. I can't imagine liking any job every minute, but I can certainly give it all I have. I'm doing this because I want to and if I ever change my mind, I will walk away. I currently run a painting company with my husband and I breakfast waitress. I am a night owl and I get about 4 hours of sleep per night, catching up when I have days off. I am accustomed to an irregular sleep schedule.

My only fear is that I will not be alert enough when I have to hop out of bed to get to a call. How does that work for you guys?

hotpig
08-12-2007, 09:30
I was a Intermediate for four years with a busy ILS Service when I started my P class. The nice thing was I was able to skip the first few months of the Paramedic class as well as a boatload of the clinical time.

D25
08-12-2007, 11:17
Originally posted by MissAmericanPie

My only fear is that I will not be alert enough when I have to hop out of bed to get to a call. How does that work for you guys?

The alarm tones are effective. I used to get a little too excited from the tones- up and 100% awake instantly, would go run a call, and then not be able to sleep for a couple hours afterword, either because it was a good call and I was excited, or a BS call and I was pissed off that someone had the nerve to call 911 because of_____.

Now, usually, the tones give me just enough "awakedness" to throw on a jump suit and make it downstairs to the rig. The groggy is mostly cleared up by the time we are on scene, and I'm asleep within 2 min. of giving report and transferring care at the hospital. I still don't sleep after bad MVAs, structure fires or flights- they're still too exciting.

hotpig
08-12-2007, 11:41
Some times I'm up and dressed before I wake up. After 22 years I respond automatically to the tones.

When I first got hired I used to jump every time that I heard the Volie Department tones that I used to be with.

I work part time on a neighboring County ALS Ambulance Service. Some times I'm stationed at a unmanned Voli Fire Dept. I have been a great source of entertainment for my partner more than once. I would be asleep on the couch and hear the tones from my Department.I would hit the floor running before I would realize that I was not working there.

RyanNREMTP
08-13-2007, 16:41
Some schools do not allow the skipping of Intermediate school. The one that I work part time for does not. That is something to consider.

kashton
08-13-2007, 21:39
I just got out of Paramedic school at TEEX in college station texas and I have my first 24 hour clinical internship as a Paramedic on an ambulance tomorrow morning at 8. I just passed my Paramedic National Registry skills exam last saturday. It has been a great class and very exciting, I am a little nervous but if you feel it is for you then go for it!

I took EMT Basic at TEEX as well and just went straight into Paramedic. They were both fast track courses, basic was 3 weeks (+ 3 months of clinicals) and paramedic was 15 weeks (+ 6 months of clinicals).

MissAmericanPie
08-13-2007, 21:48
Originally posted by kashton
I just got out of Paramedic school at TEEX in college station texas and I have my first 24 hour clinical internship as a Paramedic on an ambulance tomorrow morning at 8. I just passed my Paramedic National Registry skills exam last saturday. It has been a great class and very exciting, I am a little nervous but if you feel it is for you then go for it!

I took EMT Basic at TEEX as well and just went straight into Paramedic. They were both fast track courses, basic was 3 weeks (+ 3 months of clinicals) and paramedic was 15 weeks (+ 6 months of clinicals).

Congratulations and good luck!!

BTW, could you hold a job during the 15 week course or was it full time and time intensive?

kashton
08-13-2007, 22:15
It was twice a week, 8-5 but there was a lot of studying in between class times. We had tests about every other day and many medicaton quizzes. We had to learn a large amount of material in a very short period of time so it was pretty intense. I didn't work while I was taking the class.

kashton
09-02-2007, 11:41
Well, I am a 22 year old Paramedic student. I just finished classes a month and a half ago and have been doing my clinical internships since then. I saved someone's life last night who had a blood sugar of 21 when we arrived on scene. It feels good to save a life and watch them come to while you are on your way to the hostpital (we have a 15-35 min transport time depending on where we are called to, we are in a rural area which is great because we can work the patient all the way to the hospital, good training ;)). Try it out and if you like it go for it! Every time I leave a 24 our shift, I miss it when I'm driving home and want to go back. I love the rush hearing that alarm go off and never knowing what you are going to get called to... best of luck

Kevin

hotpig
09-02-2007, 13:10
kashton


You will get over it with time. A good shift is one that you have no calls on. Unfortunately good shifts are getting fewer all the time.

I have to go to my part time job tonight for a twelve hour shift in the ER/Ambulance. Sunday nights are extremely busy and then slow down around 2am on the ambulance. We will either also slow down in ER or have a packed house all night.

Since it is a holiday I expect to be very busy all night. I can expect to get in aleast one physical altercation with a drunken idiot by the end of the shift.As a bonus I may get to wrestle with a psych also.If it was not for this I think I would have called off tonight.:thumbsup:

4095fanatic
09-02-2007, 20:23
15 week program? Must be nice... shortest you can grab in MD is 9 months, and I heard in MO the shortest you can grab in 12 *sigh*. I should look into that... websites would be nice if you can get time to link 'em.

kashton
09-02-2007, 21:32
Well, I did get to sleep for 4 and a half hours last night so that was a bonus. We didn't get called out from 2:30 am until 7 am.

hotpig
09-02-2007, 21:54
I'm working now. ER has about a one hour wait to get in. That is considered a long wait time at this hospital. I'm sure Administration will get customer complaints in the am.

Nothing real exciting other than I picked up a post arrest at a Nursing Home a few minutes ago. Labs just came back and her potassium is real low. I had a ALS intercept with a BLS unit with a sob pt.

kashton
09-02-2007, 22:53
Well good luck tonight. I'm headed to bed I'm exhausted :) mmmm sleep

MissAmericanPie
09-24-2007, 22:15
Hi, again!:wavey:

Well my class is almost over. I have passed all of the wilderness EMT requirements and my New Hampshire state practical exam is Thursday. I am freaking out.

There will be a splinting station, a cardiac/defib station, a patient assesment system station (the one I am really worried about) and a long/short board station and one more which I can't remember. I was at the school today for 14 hours between classtime and practice. This program is 180 hours in 28 days - I thought it was 160. That doesn't include the two clinicals on the weekends. Uggg.

I then will take the National Registry exam by mid-October.

Wish me luck, all!!:)

MissAmericanPie
09-28-2007, 13:29
I passed my practical (after crying several times during the process and shaking like a fool [9 hours of sleep in 3 days]).:banana:

Now does anyone have any advice on studying for the National Registry exam? I've read the book and taken notes, and now I just have to organize the material and study what I know.

Thanks, guys.:)

D25
09-28-2007, 19:36
Originally posted by MissAmericanPie


Now does anyone have any advice on studying for the National Registry exam? I've read the book and taken notes, and now I just have to organize the material and study what I know.



You answered your own question- "study what I know." You know it. Relax. Trying to cram a couple more factoids into your noggin at the risk of being a stress basket is not a good idea.;)

Good luck to you.:thumbsup:

kashton
09-28-2007, 19:51
The most important thing is to stay very calm before your exam. Just meditate for awhile before your exam and picture yourself passing with flying colors and it will happen!

MissAmericanPie
09-28-2007, 22:12
Thanks, guys.

I am actually less nervous about the written exam than I was about the practical. I am pretty good with written material and I know I can take this three times before I need remediation. If I don't know it by then, perhaps I should reconsider my career.......

Anyway, the practical was hell. I was a wreck to begin with and when I was told to retest with the AED station, I just about threw up. I had the most difficulty practicing that one due to the organization of verbalization and performing the skills simultaneously. I also have trouble performing - I am hard on myself and figure everyone else will be even more critical than I am. That is rarely the case, however.

For the AED, I was told that I didn't verbalize a critical element, yet I was 100% certain that I did (I didn't complain though). It turns out that that was the exact case with a couple of other students and it was overturned. The woman that goes through the scoring for the state said my skill level was excellent in every station.

Unfortunately I did have to retest in the KED station. It was so easy and I forgot nothing, but I had an "assistant" that couldn't seem to follow my instructions to keep the head in an in-line neutral position and I had to keep adjusting everything and went over time. Also, the technique that we were taught was to wrap the patient's head with an Ace and the one that I was given had been beaten up and looked to be the size of a rope which kept rolling up the forehead. It sucked big time.

Anyway, I have confidence that I will do well on the exam. The national average is a 60% pass rate the first time around and my school has an 88%.

Thanks for the kind words. I'm so excited for this.

DScottHewitt
09-29-2007, 20:48
Originally posted by MissAmericanPie
:wavey: I'm new to this forum, though I post in CT often. I have a request for you guys, if you do not mind.

I just lost a job "opportunity" for a nice safe position with regular hours and good benefits and I told myself that if I didn't get it, I was going to start EMT training because EMS is what I really want to do.

So, if you were going to try to talk someone out of it, what would you say to him? I need to hear all of the things I don't want to hear so I know I'm ready to jump into it headlong.

Fire away and thanks. :)


PENILE DEGLOVINGS
PELVIC HEMORRHAGE INTO THE SCROTUM
BODY HERE, HEAD THERE
EXPOSED BRAINS
EVISCERATIONS
MISSING BODY PARTS
PROJECTILE VOMITING
PROJECTILE LIQUID DIARRHEA
BEING SPIT ON



If none of that bothers ya, welcome aboard. First day you get your text book, look for the "Atlas of Trauma". If you can't stand those pictures, maybe not do EMS.....



Scott

DScottHewitt
09-29-2007, 20:54
Originally posted by RyanNREMTP
You want some cons? Majority of the calls are patients that are very stable and usually nothing happens. Patients will call for stupid things and do stupid things so don't say stupid things to the patient. Pay isn't that great compared to other fields. Bring an extra set of uniforms for your shift. There are several others but since I didn't get any sleep last night while on duty I can't think of much else.

Other than that it's a great job and I still love it after 12 years.


Some more cons:

1) The 0300 "earache" call

2) The 0430 "toothache" call

3) The shift end minus 15 minutes "I can't afford a taxi to get to the ER for this tiny finger lac" call

4) The 400 pound woman on the fifth floor call


Just remember, with #1 & #2 that a "toothache" or an "earache" can be referred cardiac pain. Bunny's thing is "Treat every patient like you would want strangers to treat your grandmother if they were taking care of her."


Scott

DScottHewitt
09-29-2007, 20:56
Originally posted by sixer
A big +1 on that. The area I'm currently working in has a MAJOR problem with 911 abusers. Its a drag but when that "good call" goes out and you actually get to help someone it makes up for it. Another piece of advice I can give is try to find a company that runs 911/Fire calls, they'll pay less but you get first hand experience with the FD and their Paramedics.



Nothing tops the feeling when people look at you and say "You saved that man's life." Trust me on this.....



Scott

DScottHewitt
09-29-2007, 21:03
Originally posted by MissAmericanPie
I'm calling the FD today since they are desperate for EMT volunteers. I was talking with one of our firefighters last night and he said that the dept. will reimburse me for a portion of the training costs, as well. That is a nice little perk, but I'm doing it anyway. I hope the dept. will take me since they vote on it.

Also, he was telling me about 911 abuse calls. One woman calls for ridiculous things such as band-aids!!




Our county has started making most classes free for members of agencies that are within Augusta County or the two cities. Most agencies around here pay the cost for classes that are not covered. It helps a lot when some classes easily exceed $100 and people are VOLUNTEERING


Agencies I used to run with we had a lady that was on the border. Every EMS call got her two transport agencies and two fire departments. People complained about going so often. We went five times in one day once. Last time her "emergency" was that she could not remember how to get her oxygen turned on when she got home from the ER. You guessed it. Four agencies responded and the first person there in a POV got her all hooked up.....

The problem is people get jaded about going to calls like that. And she had medical problems. And some times her emergencies were legitimate emergencies.....


Scott

MissAmericanPie
09-29-2007, 22:21
Yeah, I would say my class exceeded $100. It was $2,000!! However, I received over 50 hours of wilderness medicine in addition to the DOT required EMT curriculum. It was a blast. I met people from all over the world and learned so much.

I haven't a big issue with any of the images of the nasty stuff in the book. My issue lies with the transition from life to death. It is eerie and it will likely disturb me at first.

I must say, since taking this course, I feel very mortal.

But I am excited to get into it. Thursday night the FD/Rescue I'll be volunteering with ran a vehicle extrication exercise. It was a blast. The FD did their thing practicing with some of the new tools we have and the EMTs extricated the dummy from the vehicle (which the FFs tipped on its side) got it on a board and went to "work". It was a great experience. I'll get voted in next meeting when I get my letters of reference.

Thanks for all of the advice.:)

DScottHewitt
09-29-2007, 23:55
Originally posted by MissAmericanPie
Yeah, I would say my class exceeded $100. It was $2,000!! However, I received over 50 hours of wilderness medicine in addition to the DOT required EMT curriculum. It was a blast. I met people from all over the world and learned so much.




Well, that is KIND of high. EMT around here is $85. (Free if you are with a County agency.)



Scott

MissAmericanPie
09-30-2007, 20:27
Originally posted by DScottHewitt
Well, that is KIND of high. EMT around here is $85. (Free if you are with a County agency.)



Scott

I could have gone with a state sponsored class for far less money, however, I would have had to travel - this one happens to be five minutes from home. This school (SOLO) is revered for wilderness medicine - it was the first of its kind in the nation and people come from all over the world to experience it. It has such a stellar reputation for putting out good EMTs and wilderness rescuers, I wanted to go with the best. Now let's see if I live up to their standards when I get going.

Dean
10-01-2007, 03:05
A friend wrote:
"The area I'm currently working in has a MAJOR problem with 911 abusers."

In my experience, you can't consider people who are seeking medical attention "911 abusers" or you'll drive yourself crazy. You'll be mad on every call. In a big city an important part of EMS work every day is managing the healthcare needs of the poor. That means carrying people to the hospital who need a ride there.

If you think every call should be a sucking chest wound, you're out of touch with big city EMS. Ride along for a few days so you can find out what the job REALLY is as opposed to the TV fantasy, if you're considering going into emergency work. :drillsgt:

Once I was sitting outside St. Lukes hospital in NYC and a young MD got out of a cab arguing with the Latino driver over the fare. This young doctor was calling the cab driver a"low life" and all of this, and then he goes to reach back in to get his bags out of the back. Meanwhile the driver slipped out of the car and came around, and was standing over him with a tire iron ready to bash his skull in. I jumped out of the bus and started yelling "Don't do it! Don't hit him!" The kid doctor never knew he almost got himself murdered, right outside of the hospital!

How's that for a "pre-hospital save?"

D25
10-01-2007, 12:20
Originally posted by Dean
A friend wrote:
"The area I'm currently working in has a MAJOR problem with 911 abusers."

In my experience, you can't consider people who are seeking medical attention "911 abusers" or you'll drive yourself crazy. You'll be mad on every call. In a big city an important part of EMS work every day is managing the healthcare needs of the poor. That means carrying people to the hospital who need a ride there.

If you think every call should be a sucking chest wound, you're out of touch with big city EMS. Ride along for a few days so you can find out what the job REALLY is as opposed to the TV fantasy, if you're considering going into emergency work. :drillsgt:



There is a big difference between 911 abusers and people seeking medical attention-big city has nothing to do with it. If someone honestly thinks they need medical attention, even if I don't necessairily think their complaint warrants it, they will get very good medical attention in my rig. The ones who I consider abusers are the ones who fake some pain so that you'll get out the morphine, the people who need a can of beans off the top shelf, the ones who refuse the services provided by Senior and Disabled Services because they know that they just need to call 911 and a paramedic will be there to remind them which pills they are supposed to take tonight.

MissAmericanPie
10-01-2007, 23:14
Originally posted by Dean
A friend wrote:
"The area I'm currently working in has a MAJOR problem with 911 abusers."

In my experience, you can't consider people who are seeking medical attention "911 abusers" or you'll drive yourself crazy. You'll be mad on every call. In a big city an important part of EMS work every day is managing the healthcare needs of the poor. That means carrying people to the hospital who need a ride there.

If you think every call should be a sucking chest wound, you're out of touch with big city EMS. Ride along for a few days so you can find out what the job REALLY is as opposed to the TV fantasy, if you're considering going into emergency work. :drillsgt:

Perhaps the person who posted that has no interest in being in "big city" EMS and prefers to care for the sick and wounded, rather than using a valuable publicly funded resource as a taxi service for the poor. If that is his position, I would have to agree with him. Maybe every call shouldn't rise to the level of a sucking chest wound, however every call should be an EMERGENCY. That is why the service is called EMERGENCY Medical Services. In reality, that is clearly not the case, but it doesn't mean it is justified.

But, I think it was just social commentary, not seething anger on his part. :)

It also appears that the poster you mention has some experience. He was relaying some of the abuses he has seen to us. I do not believe that he was citing a TV fantasy, either.;)

DScottHewitt
10-02-2007, 08:48
I think you can probably get EMT & Wilderness EMT for a better price around here.....





Scott

Hunca Munca
10-02-2007, 19:07
I hope you pass your test.

MissAmericanPie
10-02-2007, 21:07
Originally posted by DScottHewitt
I think you can probably get EMT & Wilderness EMT for a better price around here.....





Scott


:tongueout:

MissAmericanPie
10-02-2007, 21:11
Originally posted by Hunca Munca
I hope you pass your test.


Thank you very much. I hope so too. :hugs:

DoogieHowser
11-01-2007, 08:06
The FD has a contract with them and they said that it is really the only place within 1 1/2 hours that offers it. The captain was shocked as well, since the school usually offers "community programs" for people who live in the area and they are much cheaper - $895 or so. But they aren't offering any this year since there is a problem with simply getting instructors to teach the class at night. That program is spread out over a few months.

I'm going to go for it. The FD will give me $500 for the training. They would give me more he said but they are really strapped for cash and he said he appreciates my willingness to pay so much. But I'm just going to pay for it. My husband is fine with it. It is what it is.

The school comes highly recommended. It is called SOLO and people come from different states to attend. This is likely where I will get my "I" and my paramedic, if I like the school.


Hooolly sheeebe! EMT-B around here is FREE you just have to pay for the brady book so total cost = $75 for book and whatever gas you use. The state pays the instructor... Wow!

sixer
12-13-2007, 00:39
Perhaps the person who posted that has no interest in being in "big city" EMS and prefers to care for the sick and wounded, rather than using a valuable publicly funded resource as a taxi service for the poor. If that is his position, I would have to agree with him. Maybe every call shouldn't rise to the level of a sucking chest wound, however every call should be an EMERGENCY. That is why the service is called EMERGENCY Medical Services. In reality, that is clearly not the case, but it doesn't mean it is justified.

But, I think it was just social commentary, not seething anger on his part. :)

It also appears that the poster you mention has some experience. He was relaying some of the abuses he has seen to us. I do not believe that he was citing a TV fantasy, either.;)

:wavey: MissAmericanPie

Did you take your NREMT test yet? I hope all went well. To the other poster. I guess I was just ranting? I treat ALL my patients (no matter the reason they called) how I'd want to be treated.

MissAmericanPie
12-25-2007, 22:36
:wavey: MissAmericanPie

Did you take your NREMT test yet? I hope all went well. To the other poster. I guess I was just ranting? I treat ALL my patients (no matter the reason they called) how I'd want to be treated.

Yes, I took it in October - I passed. :)

I have been working on the rescue, however, we are so slow right now that I'm getting virtually no experience. I just took a part-time job at the local ski area doing base first aid. It has been really good. We assess and treat patients (call ambulance if hosptal transport is necessary), but with a slightly less-detailed standard than EMS. And I'm getting some interviewing skills and learning how to talk to patients and what to look for. Also, I'm learning how to evaluate symptoms and make treatment decisions based on that and since I'm learning on the fly (pretty much no training), I'm allowed to make reasonable mistakes and learn from them.

I'm sure that this will enable me to make fewer mistakes when I get an ambulance job where the stakes tend to be much higher and the standard of care much greater. I'm going to get some ride time in (hopefully) next month. I'll feel alot better about my skills if I'm able to use them more often.

Thanks for asking. Have a good New Year. :)

Boy, I was cranky when I posted what you quoted, eh? Sorry.

RLDS45S
12-26-2007, 16:22
Ski areas are not that mundane! I have picked up a few trauma activations from one.....and seen some results of other skiing accidents......
EMS=Assess and manage.
MD's=Diagnose and treat.

MissAmericanPie
12-26-2007, 21:41
Ski areas are not that mundane! I have picked up a few trauma activations from one.....and seen some results of other skiing accidents......
EMS=Assess and manage.
MD's=Diagnose and treat.

I'm definitely expecting some serious injuries, however, we do less than EMS would for a patient. I know I'll be able to get experience with head trauma, sprains, and fractures. But the interview skills are invaluable.

Oh, and I said "treatment" because that is what our forms say.:supergrin: