My daughter apartment was invaded in her absence [Archive] - Glock Talk

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geminicricket
08-31-2007, 21:24
It was a narrow window of her absence. Her invader is definitely a neighbor.
She left in the morning, returned about 90 minutes later, and her apartment entry door jamb was broken, her Dell laptop PC was missing, a souvenir felt blanket was taken, likely to conceal the computer, and some of her drawers had been opened and searched for valuables.

Dad, me, recommends a shotgun, reinforcing the door frame, OC spray, a self-defense class, and a CHL.

Anything missing from the recommendations?

She's OK. Her boss canceled her work shift for the evening, and she will stay the weekend with us.
The neighborhood, though, will never be seen by her as "nice".

Rijndael
08-31-2007, 21:43
http://www.homesecuritystore.com

You could go with a professional monitoring system or install one of these yourself. Its not perfect but it would be a decent deterrant for window and door openings.

geminicricket
09-01-2007, 08:49
Thank you.

All the self-defense she knows, she says she learned in junior high orchestra. Not much. Learning doesn't end.

SARDG
09-01-2007, 22:12
Although your daughter's home may have been "invaded", I think technically you have a burglary here. An actual home invasion would find the occupant at home. This individual likely (and thankfully) waited for your daughter to leave.

.45 Combat
09-03-2007, 20:39
Everything you mentioned. Don't forget the idea of a G-34.

Ballyhoo
09-04-2007, 09:46
Does the apartment complex allow dogs? Or she could even put a BEWARE OF LARGE DOG sticker on the window. Most thugs aren't going to take the chance.

Blitzer
09-04-2007, 10:24
A posse with a new rope is in order!

:rant: :burn: :steamed: :shocked: :sad:

WIG19
09-04-2007, 11:02
Originally posted by geminicricket
It was a narrow window of her absence. Her invader is definitely a neighbor.

Anything missing from the recommendations?

The neighborhood, though, will never be seen by her as "nice". I'm very sorry for her experience. Yes, you have a burglary, and I'd hope that she's working with whoever is investigating it and providing them any info. Police are reactive by their nature but perhaps some resolution may come of it.

Regarding the narrow window, near certainty it's a neighbor... which indicates that she was almost certainly surveilled to get a picture of her schedule/habits, etc.

If she's going to remain living there or in that area especially, I'd recommend some basic OPSEC practices which involve varying her route, where she regularly shops for things, etc. Besides being less predictable outside her apartment, it ends up having an effect on how long she's gone, from where she might approach, etc. She will end up being a less predictable (read harder) target than a habits-cast-in-stone (read softer) one.

All the previous suggestions are valid depending upon the steps she's willing to give a buy-in to.

:patriot:

SARDG
09-04-2007, 11:13
Originally posted by WIG19
I'm very sorry for her experience. Yes, you have a burglary, and I'd hope that she's working with whoever is investigating it and providing them any info. Police are reactive by their nature but perhaps some resolution may come of it.

Regarding the narrow window, near certainty it's a neighbor... which indicates that she was almost certainly surveilled to get a picture of her schedule/habits, etc.

If she's going to remain living there or in that area especially, I'd recommend some basic OPSEC practices which involve varying her route, where she regularly shops for things, etc. Besides being less predictable outside her apartment, it ends up having an effect on how long she's gone, from where she might approach, etc. She will end up being a less predictable (read harder) target than a habits-cast-in-stone (read softer) one.

All the previous suggestions are valid depending upon the steps she's willing to give a buy-in to.

:patriot: :goodpost:

ithaca_deerslayer
09-05-2007, 09:47
I don't have experience with this stuff. How do you stay calm?

If you think it is the neighbor, what prevents a confrontation, getting the stuff back, telling the neighbor in no uncertain terms to stay away from your daughter?

What keeps her from relocating?

Sounds like she lives a alone, is young, is probably attractive. And some neighbor guy of hers thinks he can go into her apartment? What prevents him from having other more invasive and/or dangerous thoughts and acting on them?

.45 Combat
09-06-2007, 09:08
A Glock would be great answer to any other thought's, of a criminal's wanting to do more, Now, CreditLock.com is an answer to anyone wanting to steal an identity.

kcb
09-08-2007, 08:01
That happened to us the night our first child was born...while I was having her, a neighbor, the police also felt, helped themselves to rumaging through our Condo.

It is such a feeling of invasion. We moved five months later; it is difficult to get past that feeling of violation.

I had a newborn baby and I avoided going home alone for as long as I could. Someone searched my home to be sure it was okay. My sister and brother-in-law walked in while the kid was still in the condo.

Give my best to your daughter. It's a tough thing to get past.
BUT it's been years now and so far, our HOME has been safe ever since.

:hugs: :hearts:

I'd be REALLY concerned if someone stole my laptop.
There is much information there on MOST people's computers
to give people access to a lot of things in their lives.

Of course, I have passwords, etc. But many people know how to get
around that!

You might think about who she might need to notify about that.
Her bank, credit card companies, etc.

.45 Combat
09-08-2007, 10:37
Hi, I just enrolled in lifelock, I'm sure you've seen the add's on T.V. so I took the plunge, right after midnight is when I called. They offer a 24hr. service.

geminicricket
09-11-2007, 20:47
Reading the recent entries made me think of something.

She lives in a first floor apartment. Imagine a large square parking lot surrounded by 2-story apartment buildings consisting of 4 first floor and 4 second floor habitats around central walkways.

She parks her car directly outside her bedroom window.
Such regularity and predictability is a signal. I just now realized that I should recommend she vary by some not-too-great distance the parking spaces she chooses. Don't make it too easy for an opportunistic observer to notice her presence or absence.

What do you think?

WIG19
09-19-2007, 09:38
Originally posted by geminicricket
I just now realized that I should recommend she vary by some not-too-great distance the parking spaces she chooses. Don't make it too easy for an opportunistic observer to notice her presence or absence.

What do you think? :thumbsup: Now you're absolutely getting the picture. I'm blessed to have a couple of friends/landowners who let me hunt some of the most beautiful country up here; they also like to go on exotic vacations on a whim. Besides sometimes asking me to feed their cattle, they've always asked that I feel free to stop by anytime whether to check on the dog, do some scouting, repair tree stands, hunt coyotes, whatever. There are not insignificant numbers of break-ins in rural areas around here (usually hunting cabins owned by Chicago lawyers) because of lack of human presence. My friends want the surrounding humans in the area to see another human (and armed) presence coming & going from the property while they're gone. More basic craft.

I spent a fair number of years overseas in some moderately hostile (for Americans) environments and, even now, have at least 6 different routes to work from home just out of sheer habit. Your daughter likely doesn't need to go that far; I point that out because just doing the mental exercise can put the right amount of mindset onto the front burner. I'm not talking about living in fear; I'm talking about living without it because we learn from the past & we're proactive in our own security.

Keep truckin'; you're on track. :)

:patriot:

jbirds1210
09-20-2007, 12:23
She needs a puppy!

http://img233.imageshack.us/img233/2255/meandogjq2.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

stormbringerr
09-22-2007, 21:05
i wouldn't worry too much about anyone as stupid as a thief to get any personal info out of a p.w. protected computer. most computers now will erase any personal files if they are broken into. you can get into them without a password, but all but the basic files will be gone.computers are designed to do this now automatically.
my home was broken into once a long time ago,and it does have a profound effect on the one it happens to.