Keeping an NC permit after moving out-of-state [Archive] - Glock Talk

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cbr600
10-30-2007, 22:12
I know North Carolina doesn't issue non-resident concealed handgun permits.

However, I can't find anything in the law that says a valid permit would be suspended or revoked if you move out of state. If you move, you do have to notify the issuing sheriff within 30 days, but there doesn't seem to be a requirement in the law to pay the fee to get a duplicate permit with your new address. I also don't see any requirement to notify the sheriff in your new county if someone moved from Raleigh to Chapel Hill, for example.

Has anyone moved out of state and notified the sheriff and was able to keep their North Carolina concealed handgun permit?

Has anyone moved between counties inside North Carolina? How did that work? Did you have to do anything more than file the change of address? Obviously, you would have to renew in your new county when the license expired, but if you're early in the five year period that could be a while.

Thanks for any first hand knowledge.

Glocks&Ducs
10-31-2007, 10:09
[QUOTE=cbr600;9183602]I know North Carolina doesn't issue non-resident concealed handgun permits.

However, I can't find anything in the law that says a valid permit would be suspended or revoked if you move out of state...[QUOTE]

Since one of the requirements for a NC CCP is that you are a resident of the state, doesn't it stand to reason that the permit would no longer be valid if you move out of state? I know there are exceptions, such as college or the military, but why would you be able to keep your permit otherwise? You are no longer qualified to possess it because you are no longer a resident of NC.

I am willing to bet that when you notify the Sheriff of your move, they will either require you to send the permit back to them for surrender, or tell you to destroy it because it is no longer valid.

I just don't see why there would need to be a statute stating your permit is void if you move out of state. One of the basic qualification criteria is simply not being met any longer.

cbr600
10-31-2007, 16:27
The law says "The applicant is a citizen of the United States and has been a resident of the State 30 days or longer immediately preceding the filing of the application." It doesn't say you have to remain a resident.

Glocks&Ducs
10-31-2007, 17:29
It is a STATE ISSUED PERMIT. It is issued by the state, it is controlled by the state, and it is only to be issued to state residents in accordance with STATE laws. If you become a non-resident of the state, you no longer rate the permit.

By your reasoning, someone who became addicted to drugs could legally keep their permit. Or someone that was convicted of a felony could keep their permit, because they were qualified when they applied for and received the permit.

By your reasoning, an American citizen could move to Europe and become a citizen there. Then claim they are still an American citizen because they still have a US passport in their posession.

cbr600
10-31-2007, 21:41
Thank you for sharing your opinion.

Does anyone have any feedback based on first hand experience? I'm interested in how it works for moves to a different county in NC as well as interstate moves.

I have moved within the same county and that was easy as pie because my "new" sheriff was the same as my "old" sheriff. ;)

MrsKitty
10-31-2007, 23:04
I would think that another state would be out as your permit isn't recognized without a current, valid NCDL--the very one that is listed on the front of the permit.

Bosko
11-01-2007, 16:06
I moved from Wake County to Stokes County. Before I moved, I appeared at the Wake County Sheriff's Office to inform them of my new address. The WCSO sent a message to the Stokes County Sheriff informing him of my move-in date and address. I received a copy of the message and was told to keep it with my permit and driver license because my permit would not have the same address as my new driver license. DMV gives you 30 days to get a driver license with your new address, even if you move next door to your old house. Prior to my permit's expiration, the Stokes County Sheriff sent me a letter advising me of the upcoming expiration date.

cbr600
11-01-2007, 21:10
I would think that another state would be out as your permit isn't recognized without a current, valid NCDL--the very one that is listed on the front of the permit.
The law says I have to carry the permit together with valid identification. As far as I know, a US passport (for example) is valid identification. It works great when I go through airport security. :)



Thank you Bosko. That's exactly the sort of information I'm looking for.

MrsKitty
11-01-2007, 21:58
I was told by my local Sheriff's Dept that it had to be my DL which is why I said that about the numbers. Even if they are wrong, I don't want to wind up in court investing my time and money to prove that I am right. Know what I mean? I would find out what they say where you are.

This is coming from the same SD that takes exactly 90 days to process a RENEWAL. Then I was warned that it may still not be back in that 90 days. All I can say is that IT BETTER BE. Or else. :)

Bosko
11-02-2007, 03:50
Excerpted from the Red Book, page 11: "Carrying a concealed handgun off one's premises is not lawful unless both the actual permit and a second form of identification are also possessed at the time. N.C.G.S. 14-415.11(a) requires possession of "valid identification", which is not defined. The application to apply for a permit requires listing of a driver's license or State identification number if either document is used for identification in applying for a permit."

Most, if not all, Sheriff's Offices, require listing of a driver's license because your permit number will be the same as your driver's license number. It is also cross-linked to your vehicle registration. If you are "pulled" for a traffic offense, the officer will enter your license tag number into his Mobile Data Terminal (MDT). In addition to "Wants and Warrants", he will receive a response identifying the "registered owner" of the car you are driving. If the registered owner is also the holder of a concealed carry permit, he will be advised of that fact. It's an officer safety issue and likewise a permit holder safety issue.

cbr600
11-03-2007, 13:39
This is coming from the same SD that takes exactly 90 days to process a RENEWAL. Then I was warned that it may still not be back in that 90 days. All I can say is that IT BETTER BE. Or else. :)
I know what you mean. It's like how the Wake County SO says you have to do the change of address in person. That's not in the concealed handgun law. The law only says I have to notify to sheriff, so I say the normal post office change of address card meets the legal requirement. If someone moves to Charlotte, it's not reasonable to expect them to drive to Raleigh on a work day to do a simple change of address.

Glocks&Ducs
11-03-2007, 13:54
You are trying to justify too much by what isn't written in the state law. The state law doesn't govern how the Sheriff operates their CCP system. As long as the Sheriff is following the law by having a program, and allowing anyone to apply, and issuing permits to everyone that is qualified, and informing of them of what their application status is if the process has gone over 90 days, the Sheriff is operating within state law.

If the Sheriff has written their own procedures, that is their right. They are called County laws or statutes. You still have to follow them, as well as the State laws.

cbr600
11-03-2007, 16:05
Thank you for sharing your opinion.

Wait a minute. Weren't you the same person who was saying "It is a STATE ISSUED PERMIT. It is issued by the state, it is controlled by the state"? Now you are saying the Sheriff can write "County laws or statutes." :rollingeyes:

In any case, if I'm not in County X then I'm not in their jurisdiction and don't have to follow their rules.

ConqSoft
11-03-2007, 16:14
I know what you mean. It's like how the Wake County SO says you have to do the change of address in person. That's not in the concealed handgun law. The law only says I have to notify to sheriff, so I say the normal post office change of address card meets the legal requirement. If someone moves to Charlotte, it's not reasonable to expect them to drive to Raleigh on a work day to do a simple change of address.

The address change only applies if you move within the same county, right? If you move to a different county, you would have to apply for a CCW there, no? Since you can only get a CCW from the county in which you reside.

Glocks&Ducs
11-03-2007, 17:28
Thank you for sharing your opinion.

Wait a minute. Weren't you the same person who was saying "It is a STATE ISSUED PERMIT. It is issued by the state, it is controlled by the state"? Now you are saying the Sheriff can write "County laws or statutes." :rollingeyes:

In any case, if I'm not in County X then I'm not in their jurisdiction and don't have to follow their rules.


Were you really born this slow, or did you sniff too much glue?

Your right to a CCP is determined by State law and it is issued by the state via the local Sheriff. The specific process is governed by the Sheriff of the county you reside in. The Sheriff must issue permits in accordance with state and federal laws. Do you get it? He is following the laws he is required to. You are following the laws you are required to. Including his.

Federal law
State law
County law

If you aren't in their county, why are we even having this discussion? The residents of that county DO have to follow those regulations.

cbr600
11-03-2007, 17:35
Thank you once again for sharing your opinion.

I'm sorry if the "after moving" aspect of this discussion wasn't clear.

Also, I encourage accounts based on first hand experience from people who have done it.

Thanks!

Glocks&Ducs
11-03-2007, 17:36
The address change only applies if you move within the same county, right? If you move to a different county, you would have to apply for a CCW there, no? Since you can only get a CCW from the county in which you reside.

CCP is issued by the state, not the county. If you move to another county, you do not have to apply all over again. You simply get a new permit with the new address on it, via the new sheriff department, after you fill out the change of address form.

Bosko
11-03-2007, 20:44
(d) A person who is issued a permit shall notify the sheriff who issued the permit of any change in the person's permanent address within 30 days after the change of address. If a permit is lost or destroyed, the person to whom the permit was issued shall notify the sheriff who issued the permit of the loss or destruction of the permit. A person may obtain a duplicate permit by submitting to the sheriff a notarized statement that the permit was lost or destroyed and paying the required duplicate permit fee. (1995, c. 398, s. 1; c. 507, s. 22.1(c); c. 509, s. 135.3(e); 1997, c. 238, s. 6; 2000‑140, s. 103; 2000‑191, s. 5; 2005‑232, s. 3.)

I effected this notification by personally appearing at the Records section of the Wake County Sheriff's Office before I moved. It is noteworthy that N.C.G.S. 14-415.11(d), as written, does not appear to distinguish between a permanent address change within the county of issuance or a permanent address change to another county. In the latter case, based on your notification, the issuing Sheriff will notify the Sheriff of the county into which you are moving of your new address by an official message. Keep a copy of that message with your permit.

Likewise, DMV also requires that you obtain a "duplicate" driver's license, bearing the new permanent address, within 30 days after a permanent address change.

The Stokes County Sheriff did not call me in for a "new" permit until it was time to renew. His official letter concerning the pending expiration of my permit in 90 days, did reflect my current address and permit number.

Hope this helps.

Glocks&Ducs
11-03-2007, 20:52
(d) A person who is issued a permit shall notify the sheriff who issued the permit of any change in the person's permanent address within 30 days after the change of address. If a permit is lost or destroyed, the person to whom the permit was issued shall notify the sheriff who issued the permit of the loss or destruction of the permit. A person may obtain a duplicate permit by submitting to the sheriff a notarized statement that the permit was lost or destroyed and paying the required duplicate permit fee. (1995, c. 398, s. 1; c. 507, s. 22.1(c); c. 509, s. 135.3(e); 1997, c. 238, s. 6; 2000‑140, s. 103; 2000‑191, s. 5; 2005‑232, s. 3.)

I effected this notification by personally appearing at the Records section of the Wake County Sheriff's Office before I moved. It is noteworthy that N.C.G.S. 14-415.11(d), as written, does not appear to distinguish between a permanent address change within the county of issuance or a permanent address change to another county. In the latter case, based on your notification, the issuing Sheriff will notify the Sheriff of the county into which you are moving of your new address by an official message. Keep a copy of that message with your permit.

Likewise, DMV also requires that you obtain a "duplicate" driver's license, bearing the new permanent address, within 30 days after a permanent address change.

The Stokes County Sheriff did not call me in for a "new" permit until it was time to renew. His official letter concerning the pending expiration of my permit in 90 days, did reflect my current address and permit number.

Hope this helps.

Exactly. The Sheriff from the county you are moving from gives you a letter, which shows the address/county you have moved from, and the address/county you are moving to. You keep the letter with your permit, and your ID.

Go to your local Sheriff and see if they will put an out of state address on that letter. NOT.

cbr600
11-03-2007, 21:10
You simply get a new permit with the new address on it, via the new sheriff department, after you fill out the change of address form.

Exactly. The Sheriff from the county you are moving from gives you a letter, which shows the address/county you have moved from, and the address/county you are moving to. You keep the letter with your permit, and your ID.

Thank you for sharing your wide range of personal opinions on this matter.

Glocks&Ducs
11-03-2007, 21:41
Thank you for sharing your wide range of personal opinions on this matter.

I guess you are trying to prove something by claiming I am stating my opinion. But you aren't proving anything, except that you lack the faculties to make a valid argument.

I personally saw it done as I described earlier. Sheriff issued the letter, that letter was taken to the new Sheriff. New Sheriff put in request for new card with new address. When the new card came in, the old card and the "transfer" letter were confiscated. This had to be done in person so the new card could be signed in the presence of the issuing authority.

Bosko posted with a different experience. I am willing to bet it depends on how far the renewal date is, as to what course of action the Sheriff takes in getting a new card. Or different Sheriff's have different procedures they have decided to follow. But the letter "transfer" letter is the common factor. It is an in state, county to county letter.

cbr600
11-03-2007, 21:52
I welcome additional first hand information from anyone who has actually done this - either to a new county or a new state. I'm not interested in theories or FOAF stories.

Thank you.

Glocks&Ducs
11-03-2007, 21:55
W...a...f...m...

MrsKitty
11-03-2007, 22:52
Were you really born this slow, or did you sniff too much glue?

Your right to a CCP is determined by State law and it is issued by the state via the local Sheriff. The specific process is governed by the Sheriff of the county you reside in. The Sheriff must issue permits in accordance with state and federal laws. Do you get it? He is following the laws he is required to. You are following the laws you are required to. Including his.

Federal law
State law
County law

If you aren't in their county, why are we even having this discussion? The residents of that county DO have to follow those regulations.

First of all, you need to quit making personal attacks.

As for the topic under discussion, there are no county laws. There could be a county ordinance.

Glocks&Ducs
11-03-2007, 23:07
laws, ordinances, statutes, regulations... they are all synonymous. They mean the same thing.

RichardB
11-25-2007, 09:15
You might try this other site. As in everything that is cost free, there are no guarantees about the quality of information provided. http://www.carryconcealed.net./

Another option would be to contact the Wake County Sheriff's Office.

Also, consider that the state you are moving to may also have some rules that preclude them honoring a NC permit once you take up residence there.

This board does not presume to provide "keep you out of jail" legal expertise.

kirgi08
11-25-2007, 09:37
I know I'm steeping into a hornets nest here.A CCW will work in most of the adjoining states to the original Issue.It's called Receprocity.IE,If you don't accept the CCW from my state I won't from yours.Childish Yes/Will they Do-It maybe.'08.

RichardB
12-02-2007, 08:14
List of states with reciprocity with NC. This link is from the NC state Dept of Justice site

http://www.ncdoj.com/DocumentStreamerClient?directory=Publications&file=listofstates.pdf

Glocks&Ducs
12-02-2007, 08:47
He wasn't asking about reciprocity. He is claiming he can permanently move out of state, and not have to give up his NC concealed carry permit because the law doesn't state the exact words that he must do so.

cbr600
03-23-2008, 23:41
NCGS 14-415.11. (d) A person who is issued a permit shall notify the sheriff who issued the permit
of any change in the person's permanent address within 30 days after the change of address.
I sent the required change of address notice to my old sheriff a few months ago.

I never heard anything from him so I assume my permit is still valid.

Not that it matters a lot because I got a Florida ccw permit and that also covers me when I come back to NC to visit.
I wanted a Utah ccw permit but couldn't find anyone teaching the class:dunno:

Thanks to everyone who shared actual experiences here and in PM.