Veterans' Day 11 November 2007 [Archive] - Glock Talk

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GreenBeret1631
11-11-2007, 20:42
"It is the soldier, not the reporter, Who has given us freedom of the press.

It is the soldier, not the poet, Who has given us freedom of speech.

It is the soldier, not the campus organizer, Who has given us the freedom to demonstrate.

It is the soldier, Who salutes the flag, Who serves beneath the flag, And whose coffin is draped by the flag, Who allows the protestor to burn the flag."

Some veterans bear visible signs of their service: a missing limb, a jagged scar, a certain look in the eye.

Others may carry the evidence inside them: a pin holding a bone together, a
piece of shrapnel in the leg - or perhaps another sort of inner steel: the soul's alloy forged in the refinery of adversity.

Except in parades, however, the men and women who have kept America safe wear no badge or emblem.

You can't tell a vet just by looking.

What is a vet?
He is the old guy bagging groceries at the supermarket - palsied now and
aggravatingly slow - who helped liberate a Nazi death camp and who wishes all day long that his wife were still alive to hold him when the nightmares come.

He is the Drill Instructor who has never seen combat - but has saved countless lives by turning slouchy, no-account rednecks and gang members into Soldiers, Airman, Sailors and Marines, and teaching them to watch each other's backs.

He is the three anonymous heroes in The Tomb Of The Unknowns, whose presence at the Arlington National Cemetery must forever preserve the memory of all the anonymous heroes whose valor dies unrecognized with them on the battlefield or in the ocean's sunless deep.

He is the POW who went away one person and came back another - or didn't
come back AT ALL.

He is the "parade-riding" Legionnaire who pins on his ribbons and medals with a prosthetic hand.

She - or he - is the nurse who fought against futility and went to sleep sobbing every night for two solid years in Da Nang.

He is the career quartermaster who watches the ribbons and medals pass him by.

He is the barroom loudmouth, dumber than five wooden planks, whose overgrown frat-boy behavior is outweighed a hundred times in the cosmic scales by four hours of exquisite bravery near the 38th parallel.

He is the cop on the beat who spent six months in Saudi Arabia sweating two gallons a day making sure the armored personnel carriers didn't run out of fuel.

He is an ordinary and yet an extraordinary human being - a person who offered some of his life's most vital years in the service of his country, and who sacrificed his ambitions so others would not have to sacrifice theirs.

He is a soldier and a savior and a sword against the darkness, and he is nothing more than the finest, greatest testimony on behalf of the finest, greatest nation ever known.

So remember, each time you see someone who has served our country, just lean over and say "Thank You".

That's all most of them need, and in most cases it will mean more than any medals they could have been or were awarded.

November 11th is Veterans Day!

Now you know !!

GreenBeret1631
11-11-2007, 20:44
My thoughts on this Veterans' Day is best expressed in this video.:

http://www.iwo.com/heroes.htm

crazypilot
11-11-2007, 22:16
I would like to take the opportunity to THANK all of the civilians that have supported us. Especially those civilians that have come up to us, shook our hands and said "Thank You for your service". I can't begin to tell you how much that means to us men & women serving in the armed forces. Again, THANK YOU.

the iceman
11-14-2007, 01:18
I would like to take the opportunity to THANK all of the civilians that have supported us. Especially those civilians that have come up to us, shook our hands and said "Thank You for your service". I can't begin to tell you how much that means to us men & women serving in the armed forces. Again, THANK YOU.

+ a billion!

crazy
11-20-2007, 17:36
from a different generation, Vietnam, my heartfelt thanks to all who serve and sacrifice...

for me, although "tailor made" uniforms were waiting for me in my era, medical conditions just over the line kept me out of Army and Navy campaigns.....and to this day, it haunts me

OttoGudd
11-25-2007, 08:27
Rules of Etiquette for Dealing with Peace Activists

With all of this talk of War, many of us will encounter "Peace Activists" who will try and convince us that we must refrain from retaliating against the ones who terrorized us all on September 11, 2001.

These activists may be alone or in a gathering and most of us don't know how to react to them. When you come upon one of these people, or one of their rallies, Here are the Proper Rules of Etiquette:

1. Listen politely while this person explains their views. Strike up a conversation if necessary and look very interested in their ideas. They will tell you how revenge is immoral, and that by attacking the people who did this to us, we will only bring on more violence. They will probably use many arguments, ranging from political to religious to
humanitarian.

2. In the middle of their remarks, without any warning, punch them in the nose.

3. When the person gets up off of the ground, they will be very angry and they may try to hit you, so be careful.

4. Very quickly and calmly remind the person that violence only brings about more violence and remind them of their stand on this matter. Tell them if they are really committed to a non-violent approach to undeserved attacks, they will turn the other cheek and negotiate a solution. Tell them they must lead by example if they really believe what they are saying.

5. Most of them will think for a moment and then agree that you are correct.

6. As soon as they do that, hit them again. Only this time hit them much harder Square in the nose.

7. Repeat steps 2-5 until the desired results are obtained and the idiot realizes how stupid of an argument he/she is making.

8. There is no difference in an individual attacking an unsuspecting victim or a group of terrorists attacking a nation of people. It is unacceptable and must be dealt with. Perhaps at a high cost. We owe our military a huge debt for what they are about to do for us and our children. We must support them and our leaders at times like these. We have no choice. We either strike back, VERY HARD, or we will keep getting hit in the nose.

nick__45
11-25-2007, 08:33
from a different generation, Vietnam, my heartfelt thanks to all who serve and sacrifice...

for me, although "tailor made" uniforms were waiting for me in my era, medical conditions just over the line kept me out of Army and Navy campaigns.....and to this day, it haunts me

I can relate, well sort of. I didn't want me because I didn't pass the exam to get in Annapolis. So I ended being latte sipping college kid.