part-time paramedic school [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Peak_Oil
12-18-2007, 05:23
I'm finishing up RN school next semester, and will be starting work as an RN probably on a med/surg floor next September. I have a year before I can apply to a Masters program, and was thinking about going to part time paramedic school in that year.

I like the emergency medicine field and want to do at least two 24's a month as a paramedic in addition to my shifts as an RN. I like the ambulance and want to stay with it, but to be at the top of the field.

At the same time, I'm a little concerned with the combination of the learning curve with starting a job in a new field. I don't know whether the classroom and practicum environments would work together or not.

I know I can take the paramedic test and challenge for the certificate after five years as an RN, but I don't want to wait that long. There's so much I want to do in the medical field, I want to try to squeeze as much as I can into the next 30 years.

Skintop911
12-18-2007, 11:23
You don't have to wait that long. There are programs out there that will allow you an expedited completion of one cred when you have the other. A friend of mine in TX completed his BSN, then a short a companion course, to receive his NREMT-P. There are some parameters to work within, but it can be done. Ask your RN or EMS educators. You may have to travel/relocate.

Dual creds are in great demand in some systems. There are some programs that combine them from the start. The two are quite complementary in some applications, and more info is never a bad thing.

Good luck to you.

dan1leg
12-20-2007, 17:15
I highly recomend you do it the old fashioned way. I was an EMT went to RN and started working in an ICU, then started medic school while still on orientation. It really polished me up no what I thought I new. I know several who have gone to shake and bake paramedic and have the title, but not the knowlege and experience. It is a demanding program even without full time work, so be ready for a marathon life style while you are in.

DAN

DaleGribble
12-20-2007, 18:32
I don't know about other places but here an RN can take the 40 hour paramedic refresher course and then challenge the National Registry.

dan1leg
12-20-2007, 18:42
Nursing school and most nursing experience does not prepare you to become a good Paramedic. A 48 hr registry refresher doesn't come close to getting you ready. Just b/c you wear the patch doesn't mean you are truly field competent. While an option, I would not recomend the shake and bake method to anyone but maybe flight/transport nurses.

Just my opinion, but I wore the boots and walked in them. Now I teach paramedics full time, work part time on a med unit. And I don't even play nurse anymore.

Dan

RLDS45S
12-20-2007, 21:43
Learn to be a medic the right way, and you will be a better nurse........
Just cause you have a piece of paper does not ensure competency.......
Then again I sure as all hell know a bunch of bumbling medics and even more nurses.....

nursetim
12-20-2007, 21:55
I have to go along with the rest of the posters here. DO NOT challenge the paramedic test. The two ways of thinking can confuse. It's like taking Spanish and French at the same time. One might help learning the other but it is an entirely different language.
Good luck in your future endeavors. I'm getting ready to statr my last semester in my NP program as well. Go for what you want, you'll get there.

Lynn D
12-22-2007, 17:01
I'm having similar thoughts as OP.....

My $0.02. I'm an RN for 3 years. Just started working in ICU/step-down setting, and am orienting for next 12 weeks to ICU level care. Also EMT-B.

In just the two weeks I've been in ICU, I see how much "carry over" in similarities there are between some of the skills. But, I also see some of the significant differences in function.

I live in an area where I can choose to "bridge" to EMT-P or take a full 18 month program. From where I stand right now, I know that the "full program" is the deal for me. The two fields have a lot of similarities, but the one difference is the approach to care and how you "do what you do" given your role (and location).

It's going to be at least a year of so before I start, and I'm looking forward to it.

Best wishes.

Sucka
12-23-2007, 15:21
I remember when i was working as an EMT which did mostly interfacility transfers (god that sucked). We did the CCT transports and the nurses would just sit there and make about $175 a pop. You would get the "nurse curse" and run about 6 back to back CCT's. Those nurses were pulling in over $1000 a shift, and all they did was take and give turnovers. I think all they needed was their ACLS. It's about as exciting as watching paint dry, but those nurses could work full time, or 1 days a month, something you might want to look into. This was for AMR in So-Cal by the way.

Having worked as a medic for the last 7 years though, please go through the proper steps. I remember maybe 2-3 times on a routine CCT the patient went into full arrest, and my god those nurses were so bad at what they did. At the time i was only an EMT, so i really didn't know much, but in hindsight, they didn't belong anywhere near ALS equipment out in the field.

ETA: Now that i think about it, i believe they needed to have some sort of ER/ICU time under their belt, so maybe you couldn't do this right out of the gate, but keep it in mind. If i went the RN route, i for sure would do 2-3 shifts a month for that money. Probably the easiest money to be made in the medical field. They had nextel's and would meet us at the hospital in their personal vehicles, they wouldn't even unload their crap to the ambulance. My partners ask me why i hate RN's and after this post i think i know why now....lol

Lynn D
12-23-2007, 16:43
I remember when i was working as an EMT which did mostly interfacility transfers (god that sucked). We did the CCT transports and the nurses would just sit there and make about $175 a pop. You would get the "nurse curse" and run about 6 back to back CCT's. Those nurses were pulling in over $1000 a shift, and all they did was take and give turnovers. I think all they needed was their ACLS. It's about as exciting as watching paint dry, but those nurses could work full time, or 1 days a month, something you might want to look into. This was for AMR in So-Cal by the way.

Having worked as a medic for the last 7 years though, please go through the proper steps. I remember maybe 2-3 times on a routine CCT the patient went into full arrest, and my god those nurses were so bad at what they did. At the time i was only an EMT, so i really didn't know much, but in hindsight, they didn't belong anywhere near ALS equipment out in the field.

ETA: Now that i think about it, i believe they needed to have some sort of ER/ICU time under their belt, so maybe you couldn't do this right out of the gate, but keep it in mind. If i went the RN route, i for sure would do 2-3 shifts a month for that money. Probably the easiest money to be made in the medical field. They had nextel's and would meet us at the hospital in their personal vehicles, they wouldn't even unload their crap to the ambulance. My partners ask me why i hate RN's and after this post i think i know why now....lol

Sorry you felt that way during those transfers. Unfortunately for me, RNs do not do a whole lot of inter-facility transfers here in NY. Locally, I know that they do them for critical pediatric patients (we have a "children's" hospital). But other than that, RNs are generally only doing pre-hospital care with an air ambulance agency. And I'm pretty sure not at $175 per transfer either.

My hospital requires me to be proficient in ACLS, and I have to have a current BLS card too. And I know that I don't get nearly $175 an hour for what I do at the hospital.....

When I do become a paramedic, it won't be for the money. Same reason I became a nurse....not for the money.

Sorry to hijack.

D25
12-23-2007, 17:02
I like the emergency medicine field and want to do at least two 24's a month as a paramedic in addition to my shifts as an RN. I like the ambulance and want to stay with it, but to be at the top of the field.


Not to burst anyone's bubble, but two 24s per month will not leave you at "the top of the field." Maybe you'll have a patch that says "P" on your shoulder, but like others have already said, having the cert and being good are two different critters.

Sucka
12-24-2007, 04:59
When I do become a paramedic, it won't be for the money. Same reason I became a nurse....not for the money.

No one becomes a medic for the money, but surely they become RN's for the money in So-Cal :cool:

At AMR when i left, i think starting medics were making something in the neighborhood of $9.75/hr. Try living on that in So-Cal, not bloody likely. Pay as a fire/medic was significantly better, which was pretty much everyones goal in private ambulance anyways.

The job market and money in nursing when i left San Diego was so insane, i even thought about going back to school. I never did care for the extended care aspect of nursing though. I think after 8 years in the field, i've learned that the best part of the call is the turnover when i no longer have to render care :tongueout:

If i recall, they got even more than $175 for calls after ~8pm at night too. What a gig that was for them.

Good luck, medic school isn't a walk in the park. I'm sure you'll have some kind of internship in the field as part of your schooling, so i advise strongly that you do some ride-a-longs. The folks that never worked as EMT's or got any experience in the field were always the ones to fail out. I don't care if you ace every test during didactic, if you can't communicate on scene with your crew, and your patient while delegating what's going on, you won't last long out there.

Lynn D
12-24-2007, 11:11
Good luck, medic school isn't a walk in the park. I'm sure you'll have some kind of internship in the field as part of your schooling, so i advise strongly that you do some ride-a-longs. The folks that never worked as EMT's or got any experience in the field were always the ones to fail out. I don't care if you ace every test during didactic, if you can't communicate on scene with your crew, and your patient while delegating what's going on, you won't last long out there.


+1 to that.....

obxemt
12-24-2007, 13:04
In North Carolina, RNs could just challenge the state EMT-P test and become medics. That was accurate in the early 2000s, don't know if it has changed.