2001 Crown Vic Interceptor [Archive] - Glock Talk

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truxrme
12-18-2007, 18:33
After stating car and then putting foot on brake to drive it dies? I can start in neutral and slam into drive and does fine.....vacume leak? Alternator?

AutomotiveTech
12-19-2007, 12:47
The first thing I would check would be a vacuum leak. I do not think a alternator would cause this without other symptoms. On new cars it can be very difficult to diagnose a problem without a scan tool. If the check engine light is on you could take the car to the local parts house and see if they have a scanner to check codes, and if it has a lean code then your problem is most likley a vacuum leak. If it is bad enough to cause the car to die then with the engine running you should be able to hear the leak, and determine where it is comming from. There are many things that could cause what you describe, and it may be something you will need to take to a shop to get diagnosed.

itsnitro
12-19-2007, 12:51
Or maybe it has a kill system in it that LEO's use to prevent theft of car?!
Where did you purchase the car from? is it a used LEO car? or has it been privately owned? check that out first by inspecting the floor board under the carpet on driver's side for a kill switch. Also look under the dash of the driver side for anything like that. Lets us know.

truxrme
12-19-2007, 21:49
Ok, so far so good, went to the local Auto Zone and whaa laa code for the # 5 coil pack was the reading bad. So $48 later we have a running car....thanks all for the input, I think from now on I will be using the parts store and have then diagnose the newer stuff, much cheaper that way,

Ron3
12-19-2007, 22:12
Ok, so far so good, went to the local Auto Zone and whaa laa code for the # 5 coil pack was the reading bad. So $48 later we have a running car....thanks all for the input, I think from now on I will be using the parts store and have then diagnose the newer stuff, much cheaper that way,

Be carefull, pulling a code is only one part of diagnosing a problem.

Kinda like telling a doctor "my stomach hurts". He can't tell you why without doing a proper diagnosis. Anything else is just a guess.

Ron3

truxrme
12-20-2007, 00:03
Be carefull, pulling a code is only one part of diagnosing a problem.

Kinda like telling a doctor "my stomach hurts". He can't tell you why without doing a proper diagnosis. Anything else is just a guess.

Ron3

Isnt that what was done Ron3? How else should I diagnose ?

AutomotiveTech
12-20-2007, 12:28
I am not trying to put words in anyones mouth, but I think I know what Ron3 is getting at. Sometimes the check engine light will come on and the computer will set a code, and the fix will be to reprogram the computer. At times a code may set that is caused by a problem that is not as simple as swapping a part. I am glad you were able to fix your problem and save alot of money doing it yourself, but be aware that some problems require resources that the average home mechanic or Autozone does not have access to. At least the code will tell you where to look, and in alot of cases what you did is no different than what most shops would do, but it is very frustrating to throw parts($) at a problem and not fix it.

itsnitro
12-20-2007, 13:31
Ok, so far so good, went to the local Auto Zone and whaa laa code for the # 5 coil pack was the reading bad. So $48 later we have a running car....thanks all for the input, I think from now on I will be using the parts store and have then diagnose the newer stuff, much cheaper that way,

Might want to look into replacing them all just to save the hassel for later on.
Whose to say the same thing won't happen to another coil pack down the road? Glad you got the car up and running!

Ron3
12-20-2007, 20:53
I am not trying to put words in anyones mouth, but I think I know what Ron3 is getting at. Sometimes the check engine light will come on and the computer will set a code, and the fix will be to reprogram the computer. At times a code may set that is caused by a problem that is not as simple as swapping a part. I am glad you were able to fix your problem and save alot of money doing it yourself, but be aware that some problems require resources that the average home mechanic or Autozone does not have access to. At least the code will tell you where to look, and in alot of cases what you did is no different than what most shops would do, but it is very frustrating to throw parts($) at a problem and not fix it.

Thats pretty much it.

A code for say, "#5 cylinder misfire" could be:

Bad coil
Bad PCM (Not telling coil to fire)
Bad connection from PCM to coil (damaged wire)
Bad spark plug
Bad plug wire
Bad fuel injector (Spraying too much fuel)

And there are probobly others. Or combinations of the above.

Often problems are a combination of things. For example, you could have an intake manifold leaking coolant or a valve cover gasket leaking oil and it gets down into the spark plug hole and causes a misfire. You replace a plug or wire or both and you still haven't fixed the problem.

So my point is that what you'll get for a free is a code and guess. Some problems are more common than others of course, as it your case and things worked out.

But it doesn't always go so easily and when it doesn't you should take it to a mechanic.

Ron3

liliysdad
12-24-2007, 22:30
I would be willing to bet the fuel pump goes in short order.

The #5 coil going bad is normally the first sign the pump is headed south.

Ive been in charge of the maintenance and upkeep for ten CVPIs, and this is always the first sign. We have cars that have gone through as many as eight pumps in 4 years, and some that have only eaten three in the same amount fo time. Soon, the car will start losing upper rpm power when the car is hot, and then it will feel like the transmission is slipping.

Ron3
12-25-2007, 19:09
I would be willing to bet the fuel pump goes in short order.

The #5 coil going bad is normally the first sign the pump is headed south.

Ive been in charge of the maintenance and upkeep for ten CVPIs, and this is always the first sign. We have cars that have gone through as many as eight pumps in 4 years, and some that have only eaten three in the same amount fo time. Soon, the car will start losing upper rpm power when the car is hot, and then it will feel like the transmission is slipping.

Sounds like it's time to try a different pump! If your already using Ford pumps, try aftermarket. Hopefully nobody is putting any type of heavy duty fuel system cleaner in the system, that can eat pumps and wiring too.

You guys changing fuel filters every 15K miles? Ya oughta be.

Ron3

liliysdad
01-03-2008, 22:47
Fuel filters get chanfed every 6k miles, i.e., every other oil change.

We have tried the Ford pumps, three kinds of aftermarket pumps, and are now using what Ford refers to as their upgraded pump. The new Ford pumps seem to be working out much better, but the problem still persists.

Ron3
01-04-2008, 16:52
Fuel filters get chanfed every 6k miles, i.e., every other oil change.

We have tried the Ford pumps, three kinds of aftermarket pumps, and are now using what Ford refers to as their upgraded pump. The new Ford pumps seem to be working out much better, but the problem still persists.

Hmm?

You guys ever run fuel injector cleaner thought them? As you probobly know if that stuff gets back the pump it's bad news!

Is the pump on the proper fuse? Too much voltage could burn one out I guess.

Kinked or crushed line?

Contaminated fuel?

I'm about out of guesses.

Ron3

truxrme
01-04-2008, 23:47
Update: Car still died after coil replaced, no engine light on now, changed fuel filter , then sprayed carb cleaner in air filter opening, and also the tube that connects near the back of the center intake.......so far so good, no dieing engine while its cold.....will keep you updated

Ron3
01-06-2008, 15:23
One common place for an air leak on those is the intake manifold.

They are plastic and will leak coolant and suck in air. Mostly at the front or back of the manifold. Often the coolant will leak into a spark plug hole and cause a misfire.

Ford extended warranty coverage on this issue by several years.

Look at your intake. If it has alluminum bosses on the front and back it's been replaced with the new one. If not you have the old one and this may or may not be your problem.

Ron3

dachaddwick
01-29-2008, 19:38
that same thing would happen to my old work car, it was a 2001 cvpi that my dept bought from FHP for real cheap. it would die as soon as i dropped it into gear, i talked to my LT and he brought it in and got a new fuel pump and it worked like a charm. still running at with over 140,000 miles on it!!!!!!!!!!!

truxrme
12-29-2008, 18:37
that same thing would happen to my old work car, it was a 2001 cvpi that my dept bought from FHP for real cheap. it would die as soon as i dropped it into gear, i talked to my LT and he brought it in and got a new fuel pump and it worked like a charm. still running at with over 140,000 miles on it!!!!!!!!!!!

Had the dieing problem again, found out that it was the idle control valve that was causing this .