US Army, Retired question [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Crusher47
12-24-2007, 12:52
What is the proper protocol to be considered as "retired"? I heard it was 20 years of active duty in any branch to have that designation. What about guys like me that served for 6 years only?

Also, I was watching a show about US Army Rangers on the Military channel yesterday, some of the guys interviewed were former Rangers and had the "retired" label, but they didn't look that old, as in having served 20 years, so I'm confused on this stuff.

Thanks!

AF-Odin
12-24-2007, 16:03
Normally, "Retired" from the US military would indicate eligibility to receive retired pay and have access to certain military privileges such as PX, commissary, military medical care (rather than just VA) and possession of a Retired Military ID card. In most cases, it takes 20 years minimum to be eligible for retirement, but there are some exceptions such as a medical retirement or like back in the 1990s when we were drawing down the military, there was a provision for "retiring" with as little as 15 years of service at a significantly reduced retirement pay (my brother-in-law retired with 17 years active service in 1993). many people "consider" themselves retired from any occupation they previously (but no longer) hold. I am retired from the AF with over 28 years of active duty and my wife refers to herself as a "retired" teacher though she actually only taught for a few years.

Naptown34
12-24-2007, 17:41
20 years of active duty is required for a regular retirement.

I'll be retiring on April 1, 200 after 22 yrs, 9 months. Yeehah!!!

KG Dad
12-24-2007, 17:46
To be retired, you need to have the retirement benefits letter from the military. Otherwise, your enlistment is up or you resign your commission. There are advantages to retirement, primarily income benefits. There are disadvanages. Technically, you are still part of the force, and you can be recalled either for court-martial (what I typically see) or for service (which I've also seen/advised on, think medical or intel).

And there are 1 million + 1 ways to have a screw-up occur regarding your retirement, retirement letter, etc. So if you are talking legalese, the answer is above--you need a retirement letter. If you are talking social protocol, most people view any servicemember not actively serving as "retired." Just don't push it around someone who retired according to the military bureaucratic method.

MJH

Bren
12-25-2007, 08:55
What is the proper protocol to be considered as "retired"? I heard it was 20 years of active duty in any branch to have that designation. What about guys like me that served for 6 years only?

Also, I was watching a show about US Army Rangers on the Military channel yesterday, some of the guys interviewed were former Rangers and had the "retired" label, but they didn't look that old, as in having served 20 years, so I'm confused on this stuff.

Thanks!
You don't have to be that old to retire - it takes 20 years (or disability) and since I enlisted at 17, I could have retired at 37 if I had stayed in. A 37 year-old who has stayed in shape all his life doesn't look very old.

Crusher47
12-26-2007, 22:20
OK, so what do I say for myself? Prior service? Veteran of 6 years?

KG Dad
12-27-2007, 00:14
How 'bout Patriot?

You're a vet. For most people, that says it all.

And thanks for standing in the gap.

MJH

Biscuitsjam
12-27-2007, 00:55
I think "veteran" would be the proper term, and if somebody asks, you can specify that you're no longer in the military. It cuts down on any of the "retirement" confusion though.

Crusher47
12-27-2007, 07:45
Cool, thanks guys! Stay safe out there!