What authors inspired you? [Archive] - Glock Talk

PDA

View Full Version : What authors inspired you?


Scarecrow28
01-25-2008, 14:31
What authors inspired you to begin writing? How did they influence you style, characters, and your preferred genre?

I stick mainly to the action-adventure genre. My influences early on in literature were Clive Cussler and Tom Clancy, soon followed by Vince Flynn, Robert Ludlum, Matthew Reilly, and James Rollins. Clive Cussler drew me into the genre and as I began to browse for some of his newer novels on sites like Amazon, the other authors were recommended.

Sgt. Rambo
01-25-2008, 17:14
Hands down, Nelson Demille. I think he writes the way I talk and act so he sold me right away. Vince Flynn is good and I like a few others, but I'm so TIRED of reading about the SEAL and FBI hero ...ugh Hard to relate to. I try and write with the guy like me in mind. Someone I can relate to. I write fiction and I understand it's for recreational purposes but I need to relate somehow. By far Nelson Demille is my favorite. I don't write like him but I like reading him. I like John Grisham also.

Herd Sniper
02-11-2008, 13:49
My favorite authors were Eric Frank Russell, Robert Heinlein, H.G. Wells, Jules Verne and just about anybody who wrote for those old two sided science fiction books from the late 1960s. Read one side of the book, turn it over and start on a brand new book. Those were neat books that were fun to have around. Then there was Bloch, Assimov and so on. Really great writers in those days who told a story and made you think.

Scarecrow28
02-11-2008, 13:58
Hands down, Nelson Demille. I think he writes the way I talk and act so he sold me right away. Vince Flynn is good and I like a few others, but I'm so TIRED of reading about the SEAL and FBI hero ...ugh Hard to relate to. I try and write with the guy like me in mind. Someone I can relate to. I write fiction and I understand it's for recreational purposes but I need to relate somehow. By far Nelson Demille is my favorite. I don't write like him but I like reading him. I like John Grisham also.

I know what you mean about it being hard to relate to these ex-commando type heroes. Although this is true, its also nice to be able to escape the boring predictability of everyday life with these kinds of characters. Its good to use situations that, although not similar to ones readers could relate to, could be used as a metaphor for ones they could.

husker67
02-11-2008, 16:31
I read some non-fiction, and would highly recommend: Erik Larson (especially The Devil in the White City), and John McPhee, and Thomas Ricks.

Fiction? James Lee Burke is excellent, always liked Hemingway, and Neuromancer by William Gibson is fine sci-fi....

HoBoBum
02-17-2008, 13:12
still J.D.Salinger

Jack23
02-27-2008, 13:16
There are many that I have learned form and gotten different pointers from. Here are a few.
.Stephen King-Charactere development, setting up for the "shock", natural dialogue, that is, all your characters don't sound like they are the same person. People have different ways of speaking and if your readers can identify your characters by their patterns of speech, etc, tying several story lines together in one tale, and not being afraid to go for the "GROSS OUT" as he calls it. Here are a couple of his quotes that impress me. He was once asked if he had time to do much reading for enjoyment. His answer: If you don't have time to read then you don't have time to write." He was asked how do you write a story, how do you know when it's finished. I dont remember the exact words but the jist of it goes like this: All you need to do is get a couple of chapters down and flesh out your characters. For me, it then takes on a life of it's own. I just let it wander where it needs to go and let it run it's course. Never try to end a story and never drag it out. It shows me when it is time to drop the curtin.

I have found these to be very true and very usable.

John Sanford-He writes murder mysteries (Lucas Davenport and the "Prey" books) and his bad guy are BAD making the good guys GOOD. He often gives you a view of the story through the killers eyes. He makes it very realistic and very good reading.

Robert B. Parker-He writes Detective stories Spenser is his guy. He taught me how to write wise crack/wise guy dialogue. Very funny.

Dan Brown (DiVInce Code, Angles and Deamons)-He taught me the value and importance in taking the time to do the research. It's hard to write a book about a subject of which you have no knowledge.

Richard Patterson-Shows us how to develope a long running character and keep him interesting and viable. Also how NOT to spend 3 1/2 pages describing wall paper.

Those are just a few but I think that anyone that is serious about thier writing will try to learn something from every book they read. You can also look for things to avoid. I try to do this and find it helps me a lot.