What are the benefits for an Army dependent nowadays? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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fnfalman
02-02-2008, 17:43
It's been fifteen years since I ETSed, so I'm sure a lot of things have changed. I got a friend's daughter who's getting hitched to a GI and I just want to make sure that she has what she's suppose to have. They're both young as hell, the GI and the girl. I know that the GI is going to be taken care of by Uncle Sam, but I also want to make sure that the girl is too.

So, if an active duty member can give me a heads-up as far as healthcare benefits and dental benefits, that sort of thing, I'd appreciate it. I know that PX and commissary privileges are automatic.

AF-Odin
02-02-2008, 20:23
First thing that will need to happen is that the GI and new bride will need to go to the ID Card section at his post with an original (or IIRC a certified copy) of the marriage license. She will need two forms of ID, one of which must be government issued, picture ID (Driver's License usually). When it is asertained that they are, in fact, legally married, she will be issued a military dependent's ID card which will grant her access to the installation, the PX, the commissary, and MWR activities (theater etc). As part of this process, she will be enrolled in what is called DEERS or the Defense Elegibility Enrollment System.

Once in the DEERS system as an active duty military dependent she is eligible for treatment at military medical treatment facilities. The system is now called TRICARE Prime and depending on the installation, she may receive treatmet at the military facility or, an off-post clinic, or even at an off-post hospital (depending on the circumstances). This medical coverage is at no cost to the service member (it is like your employer picking up the full cost of your medical insurance). The key here is to get as much information as possible regarding the LOCAL post specifics. Generally, if treated at a military medical facility, office visits are free, prescriptions filled at the military medical facility are free, and hospitalization is a very nominal charge per day (basically just paying for rations) with no charge for the treatment. Again, depending on the local/individual situation, dependents may be seen off post and receive prescriiptions from a civilian pharmacy that participates in TRICARE for a very minimal cost.

Dental is a whole other ball of wax. The service member must enroll the spouse (and children if any) in the militaries dental plan which does have a monthly cost. I can't remember what the cost was, but it was fairly nominal and like most dental insurance plans has co-pays and waiting periods for certain procedures like crowns or orthodontia.

In addition to the service member having up to $400k in life insurance for a very low cost, there is NOW a program to purchase life insurance for the family members at very low cost also. A VERY KEY point here is that the service member MUST change the beneficiary of his SGLI or if anything happens, the Army is required to pay who ever is listed as the beneficiary. Unfortunately, this situation has happened recently where a soldier gets married, goes to Iraq, is killed, and the parents (or even an old girl friend) is still named as the beneficiary. This is something that the family member can not do, ONLY the Soldier can change the beneficiary. However, it is very easy and can usually be taken care of at the battalion PAC. As for the $400k, it is NOT automatic, the Soldier can take less (and I know a few that did because it does cost, but very little). Another document that the Soldier needs to change immediately is his DD-93. This is the form where he states what to do with any pay, payment for accrued leave, and benefits other than insurance are paid to if he is killed. It also states who the Soldier wants notified if he is killed.

Bottom Line, there are a lot of benefits for the familes of soldiers. Some of the benefits are free or almost free, some cost a little. After the new bride gets her ID card and gets into the DEERS system, she needs to get involved with her husband's FAMILY READINESS GROUP. The FRG will have most of the spouses in the unit involved and she will be able to ask questions of the older, more expereienced spouses. Good luck to both of them.

fnfalman
02-02-2008, 21:14
Thank you very much!!!

Biscuitsjam
02-03-2008, 10:54
What rank is he? That's the single greatest factor in what her quality of life will be and you left it out of your post. Not only does it affect pay directly, but it also changes little things like quality of on-post housing or respect within the military community.

There's a webpage with all kinds of pay charts here:
http://www.armytimes.com/money/pay_charts/

Basic Pay, Basic Allowance for Housing (with dependants), per diem, clothing allowance, etc. etc. It also has some stuff on things like retirement pay.

Are spouses allowed to take advantage of GI Bill college benefits?

fnfalman
02-03-2008, 14:35
What rank is he? That's the single greatest factor in what her quality of life will be and you left it out of your post. Not only does it affect pay directly, but it also changes little things like quality of on-post housing or respect within the military community.

There's a webpage with all kinds of pay charts here:
http://www.armytimes.com/money/pay_charts/

Basic Pay, Basic Allowance for Housing (with dependants), per diem, clothing allowance, etc. etc. It also has some stuff on things like retirement pay.

Are spouses allowed to take advantage of GI Bill college benefits?

He's a Spec-4 with about three years in service.

Biscuitsjam
02-03-2008, 22:11
"Regular Military Compensation is the average annual military salary earned by service members. These figures combine basic pay, the Basic Allowance for Subsistence and the Basic Allowance for Housing. They also include the tax advantage from untaxed allowances. They do not include the overseas housing allowance or the overseas cost-of-living allowance. . . Average military salaries as of Jan. 1:

E4 with 3 years $42,906.85 ($23,389 in base pay, the rest in other allowances or benefits)
E5 with 6 years $49,741.65 ($28,861 in base pay, the rest in other allowances or benefits)
E6 with 8 years $57,670.71 ($34,081 in base pay, the rest in other allowances or benefits)
E7 with 12 years $66,218.31 ($41,317 in base pay, the rest in other allowances or benefits)
E8 with 16 years $73,766.20 ($47,642 in base pay, the rest in other allowances or benefits)
E9 with 20 years $87,989.89 ($59,886 in base pay, the rest in other allowances or benefits)

(time-in-service for examples picked relatively randomly)

http://www.armytimes.com/money/pay_charts/


A big part of compensation currently is reenlistment bonuses, but it isn't really possible to predict how big those will be in advance. The current max is $40,000 but I don't know who is eligible for that big of a bonus or what the term is.

fnfalman
02-04-2008, 09:19
Thanks for the info. I figured out how much he makes with the benefits, I was more concerned with the girl knowing all that she's entitled to and make use of the various benefits and services available to dependents.

Biscuitsjam
02-04-2008, 14:41
Some Soldiers Eligible for MGIB Benefits Transfer
Army News Service | July 21, 2006
Washington D.C. - The Army announced today the implementation of a pilot program allowing Soldiers in critical skills who reenlist the ability to transfer Montgomery GI Bill benefits to their spouse.

Enlisted Soldiers who have completed at least six years of service, reenlist for a minimum of four years, qualify for a Selective Reenlistment Bonus (SRB), and are entitled to a Zone B or Zone C bonus will have the option to transfer up to 18 of 36 months of their MGIB entitlement. Soldiers can choose between a full SRB or a slightly reduced SRB plus the ability to transfer more than $18,000 in benefits.

The fiscal 2006 basic MGIB monthly benefit for fulltime training is currently $1,034. This benefit is also available but prorated for part-time enrollment.

Soldiers who elected the Army College Fund (ACF) as an enlistment option and/or have enrolled and paid toward the $600 MGIB Additional Opportunity can include their expanded benefit (MGIB, ACF and MGIB Additional Opportunity) in the transferability program.

The Army will study the results of the program with the possibility of making it a permanent part of the Army’s reenlistment policies.

“The Army continues to focus on and provide support to Soldiers’ families because it is the right thing to do, and because we know that we recruit Soldiers, but retain families,” said Maj. Gen. Sean Byrne, director of Army Military Personnel Management.

Education benefits are a key component of the incentive package used by the Army to attract and retain quality Soldiers. At the foundation of these benefits is the MGIB. The transferability of MGIB benefits is an additional lever being used to retain Soldiers with critical skills.

Soldiers interested in participating in the program should visit their Army retention career counselor for information.


http://www.military.com/features/0,15240,106524,00.html