what would you eat if you had to grow it? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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RWBlue
03-16-2008, 21:06
Pulled from another thread, but worth it’s own thread.

mitchshrader “what would you eat if you had to grow it?”

I am working on my answer, but don't have a complete picture, yet.

boarsblood
03-16-2008, 21:18
Corn, soybeans, tomatoes, peppers, pumpkins, etc.

Nakkie
03-16-2008, 22:18
Corn, taters, soybeans, fava beans, green beans, peas, beets, summer and winter squashes, truck crops like the leafy vegetables and herbs. Also an oilseed crop like flax or canola.

justcor
03-16-2008, 22:20
Why Solyent Green of course. :supergrin:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/1/14/SolyentGreen28d.png

RWBlue
03-16-2008, 22:40
One more thing, how much property would it take?

BigFatDog
03-16-2008, 22:42
Corn, beans, beets, carrots, kale, spinach, broccoli, cauliflower, asparagus, tomatoes, strawberries, apples, pears, brambles, peppers, squash...

Am I the only guy on here who subscribes to Backyard Poultry? :)

http://www.backyardpoultrymag.com/

ETA: Well if stuck in my city house... I'd leave out the brambles & asparagus. I've already got the apples, pears & herbs in my kitchen garden. We do kale in front beds in the winter now. The rest of the raised beds, currently housing roses, azaleas and hedge plantings would be converted to foods stuff. Except for the old english climbing roses. I'll still keep those for jelly. I'd be using that square foot method that you dislike RWBlue. I would estimate around 1500+ square feet. I'd likely replace the back grass with 3 sisters plantings for even more production. That's corn. beans & squash btw. Grown together on the same mound.

Nakkie
03-16-2008, 22:59
One more thing, how much property would it take?Do you mean to totally feed one person for a year on a diet of things you grow yourself?

RWBlue
03-17-2008, 00:03
Do you mean to totally feed one person for a year on a diet of things you grow yourself?

I didn't think the question through, but that is a good definition.



As far as the square foot method, I disagree with certain parts. I think certain parts will only work while we have society.

Nakkie
03-17-2008, 00:16
I didn't think the question through, but that is a good definition.



As far as the square foot method, I disagree with certain parts. I think certain parts will only work while we have society.Are you talking about the part where you get to harvest the produce you grew before everyone else helps themselves? :supergrin:

PS - I think about 1750 s.f. (700 linear feet of 30" spaced rows) in corn will roughly support one person for a year.

Peak_Oil
03-17-2008, 00:52
That's my big survival prep, growing and raising all the food I need/want for myself and family, year after year. I'm just getting started with a little container gardening in the city to learn something before we move to the sticks.

So far, I've got essentially a spice garden, an orange tree, and a dozen strawberry plants.

Eventually, I want to buy my beans and rice, and grow the peppers, tomatoes, onions, garlic, lettuce, rosemary, thyme, and a million other things. I'm really excited about it and looking forward to it.

RWBlue
03-17-2008, 01:03
Are you talking about the part where you get to harvest the produce you grew before everyone else helps themselves? :supergrin:


Lets say you crucify the first person, and everyone decides to stay away.

Akita
03-17-2008, 07:29
/////

Nakkie
03-17-2008, 08:04
Lets say you crucify the first person, and everyone decides to stay away.Don't let the scarecrow drip on the garden. Just a health concern.

Grayson
03-17-2008, 08:05
I like taters, and carrots, and cucumbers...squash...I don't like raw onion, but like it cooked with stuff...

My mamaw grew a few cukes in a hanging flowerpot a while back, hadn't seen that before. She used to have a BIG garden, but at 90, she just don't have the get up and go anymore (at least PHYSICALLY).

Wish I could go back in time and pop my younger self on the head and tell me to get in there with her and LEARN it...

I think I'll be helping my cousin garden this year. Short of me patrolling with my 870 and those S&B rubber buckshot I got, any good ideas to keep the deer out?

BlackhawkFan
03-17-2008, 09:23
Whatever I can grow indoors. Tomatoes, Serranos, Garlic, Onions, Green Beans, Okra.... Stockpiling carbs, Pintos, Dried Peas.

Won't cultivate any part of my acre because doing so will draw attention to myself. Also, having an outdoor garden means I'd have to cage the garden to keep out the birds and rabbits.

I like the idea of growing flax, but I suspect it takes a lot of land.

glockawakka
03-17-2008, 10:27
Dandelions. You get a nice mix of everthing in them. flowers, greens, roots and seed. easy to grow, hardy, grow just about anywhere, and fast too.

Tomatoes and variety of hot and sweet peppers, onions (probably scallion or ramps), berries,

Wish I could grow kelp but thats a pipe dream. I could harvest seaweeds but never done it so I wouldn't put too much stock in it.

Ronnoc
03-17-2008, 10:39
Mostly what I do now, tomatoes, peppers, herbs, cucumbers, squash, zuchinni, potatoes, lettuce, grapes, peaches, plums. If I can get my garden to work right, cabbage, onions, eggplant. Radishes seem to work well. I have blackberrries, but they are not good producers.

I have plenty of acorns, those things are everywhere.

sniper4x4
03-17-2008, 11:42
every year we have the following

onions
russet taters
sweet taters
green beans
tomatoes
carrots
celery
rubarb
okra
cucumbers
bell peppers
banana peppers
jalapeno
sunflowers

Im sure there is more that I am forgetting.

Mikeyboy
03-17-2008, 13:20
I grow Almonds, Tomatos, Cucumbers, Snap Peas, jalapeno and bell peppers, pumpkins, and I'm trying corn this year. I really like sunflower, but so do all the critters in the neighborhood.

Also I'm going to buy two apple trees to go with my Almond trees. Home Depot are selling Dwarf apple, cherry and peach trees for only $20 a pop. Just make sure you read up if you need pollinators or not. Apples you do, that is why I'm getting a pair.

GlockSupremacy
03-17-2008, 17:15
Not bear.

http://www.wyominghuntingedition.com/images/225%5Bhotos/survivebear.jpg

then we make him food too! taste better than corn, that for sure!

lilc
03-17-2008, 18:43
Dandelions... They're more nutritious than spinach, and they grow like *AHEM* weeds! :supergrin:

http://www.pbase.com/image/59488616.jpg

The greens are excellent, and the heads make a healthful tea.

mitchshrader
03-17-2008, 19:02
or wine. :)

Now about growing stuff.... I like it and am stuck in an apartment and drool and dream to have a garden. I got seed catalogs with the pages dog eared and lines drawn and budgets figured and all that.

The big half of SHTF to me is I get to grow a garden. :) Ya'll hurry to heck up.

Last one I grew was 10 raised beds with drip irrigation, and i can tell stories all day. i fell into it and didn't come up for air. You know you can buy guaranteed 100 lb pumpkin and watermelon seeds?

I did things ya ain't supposed to do. Transplanted *corn*.. :)

Fun. Wallowed in it. Now, stuff that works for various purposes, not kitchen garden per se.. is sugar beets. Mangels. Most energy per acre. Right next is potatoes. Pumpkins are up there. they all keep fairly well, the beets and potatoes make fuel, the pumpkins make animal feed. Good animal feed.

For kitchen garden, ya want greens, radishes, onions, garlics, strawberries and asparagus in the corners and dewberries and gooseberries on the fence. Grapes if you're patient enough and stable enough.. You want corn, beans, and squash and tomatoes.

You want cukes, cabbages, turnips, and parsnips. Potatoes, yams, and a couple kinds of peas. It takes little space. It takes INTENSE concentration and tons of daily labor. it's about like knitting a garden. to get exceptional results, you do it nearly continuously.

Seeds are easy. If you've got lots of hot direct sun, eggplants and peppers do well, not much otherwise. As a rule of thumb, stuff of one type of cuisine will do well in the same area.... As another, KEEP GREEN THINGS AROUND, from mint to mustard, the more greens of various types the healthier the people. Sprouts beat nothing a bunch.. and a pound of alfalfa seeds makes approximately a chicago sized lump of sprouts...

Mikeyboy
03-17-2008, 19:38
Dandelions... They're more nutritious than spinach, and they grow like *AHEM* weeds! :supergrin:

http://www.pbase.com/image/59488616.jpg

The greens are excellent, and the heads make a healthful tea.

Not too much, dandelion also make a good diuretic, Its good for you in limited amounts, but eating large bowls of dandelion salads every day may be bad for you, especially when your already on a limited SHTF diet.

R_W
03-18-2008, 08:48
PS - I think about 1750 s.f. (700 linear feet of 30" spaced rows) in corn will roughly support one person for a year.

That seems a little low--maybe in a good year with a good HYBRID seed. I think you need to plan for a lot more than that for all the oh ***** factors--bugs, drought, flood, heat, cold, etc.

ONG
03-18-2008, 12:09
The size of the plot is determined by the strength of the soil. If you have good rich well drained fertile soil you will need far less dirt to harvest the same amount of food. Also less work, which I am big on.

RWBlue hit me up about this at the Ohio campout, we have been raising our own food, putting it up (canned, frozen, dried) for the last 31 years.

We make our own sauerkraut, raise several different kinds of mushrooms (all legal btw) even built a chicken tractor for garden patch last summer.

RWBlue
03-23-2009, 15:20
I decided to dig some good threads out of the past.

havensal
03-23-2009, 16:55
I have a small, 25'X25', garden behind my garage. I live in town and don't have enough room for more. I have it fenced in and the fence is hidden by blackberries and raspberries. One side is hidden by blueberries and grapes as well (just planted last spring). I have strawberries planted along the back wall foundation and in front of the driveway. I have tried to use as much available space for crops as I can.

I usually grow potatoes, pumpkins, corn, tomatoes and peas. I plant watermelons and cantaloupe, but have poor results.

That being said, there is no way I could feed myself for a year, let alone my family of 4. I am not that good of a gardener, I don't have enough land and the season isn't long enough here. :dunno:

Dennis in MA
03-23-2009, 19:15
This is the point I make to guys that are gonna "go up into the mountains and live off the land." It doesn't work. YEr better off in teh lowlands with flat farmable ground. Takes a LOT to feed one family. Esp. with variety and then cereal grains. And as the early settlers realized, one bad year and you are fudged. There is a distinct advantage ot society that we tend to ignore in our dreams of survivalism. I keep thinking of that Robin Williams flick in the 80's.

shotgunred
03-23-2009, 20:28
cows!:supergrin:

22rtf2
03-23-2009, 20:34
Tomatoes, soy beans, anything anti-oxidant!

mitchshrader
03-23-2009, 20:42
if i was 'growing what i ate'.. it'd be some serious work without livestock, equipment, and help. at a minimum..

if i was growing to SURVIVE.. in a society..

i'm bound to say i'd monocrop a luxury item, and live better.

i'd still have a garden but it'd be a hobby.

steelhorses
03-24-2009, 11:25
Another excellent thread!:pepper::dancingbanana::bunny:

Thinking about this on the way home last night made me hungry so I decided to make some winter stew - Corned beef, cabbage, parsnips, rutabaga and carrots.
Cleaned, peeled and threw together in the slow cooker last night and this morning yummy yummy :wow: Incredibly filling and nutricious!

If I had to grow our own food I know root crops would be a big part of our diet. Rutabags, turnips, parsnips, carrots, onions, potatos, etc. Dense, high nutrient foods that keep well. Feeding ourselves during the spring, summer, fall won't be nearly as challenging as keeping from starving during the winters.

from wikipedia:

The rutabaga, swede (from Swedish turnip), or yellow turnip (Brassica napobrassica, or Brassica napus var. napobrassica) is a root vegetable that originated as a cross between the cabbage and the turnip. Its leaves can also be eaten as a leaf vegetable.

History
Harvested roots.

Swede was an important nutritional source for many Finno-Ugric tribes before the introduction of potatoes. Some claim the vegetable is native to Sweden, but others think it was introduced to Sweden, possibly from Finland or Siberia, in the early 17th century.[citation needed] From Sweden, it reached Scotland, and from there it spread to the rest of Great Britain and to North America.

In continental Europe, it acquired a bad reputation during World War I, when it became a food of last resort. In the German Steckrübenwinter (rutabaga winter) of 1916–17, large parts of the population were kept alive on a diet consisting of swedes and little else, after grain and potato crop failures had combined with wartime effects. After the war, most people were so tired of swedes that they came to be considered "famine food," and they have retained this reputation to the present day.[citation needed] As a consequence, they are rarely planted in Germany.[citation needed]

barbedwiresmile
03-24-2009, 11:36
The way to keep from starving during winter is to learn to preserve!

I posted something about keeping chickens on the other gardening thread that I think is relevant to this one as well:

One thing home-gardeners should consider is raising chickens. Chickens and gardening go hand-in-hand. Granted, some may be unable to do this based on zoning, covenants, etc. However, for those who are able, raising a few hens is very simple, and very inexpensive.

You can purchase hatchlings very inexpensively and raise them very easily. A small hutch can easily be built by hand and supplies are readily available at the local hardware or 'big box' store. There are plenty of plans on-line, or you can design your own.

Your best bet is to pen the chickens in where you plan to have next year's garden. Give them as much space as you're able to. One word of advice: be careful if you have dogs. Dogs and chickens tend not to mix unless the dog has been raised with chickens around. Cats tend to be fine. Also, be aware of what natural predators you have in your area when designing their coop and pen (coyotes, etc). Also beware of threats from above if you have hawks, etc.

When you're ready to plant, move them on to a new spot in the garden (next year's garden spot) and till the soil the chickens have fertilized for you. Move them back and forth each year, or on down to the next plot if you have a lot of land. This will give the fertilizer plenty of time to compost and work it's way into the soil.

Chickens will eat almost anything, and are especially fond of left-over bread, grits, rice and other starches. Just cook extra and save some for the birds. They also like leftover fresh vegetables and cuttings from vegetables. You can purchase chicken crumble and cracked corn very inexpensively from your local feed store, chain store, etc. Finally, they do a lot of scratching around and eat various bugs and worms.

As a bonus, you'll have a good supply of fresh eggs. This is obviously the short version and not meant to be a how-to. But keeping chickens is very simple, they are very self-sufficient, and they do wonders for improving your soil. Barred Rocks and Rhode Island Reds, among others, are hearty, good layers and commonly available. There's tons of information on-line. Just figured I would give my .02

(one word of caution- sometimes chicks bought from non-specialty stores are improperly sexed and you end up with a few roosters. You may want one rooster if you're going to have 4-6 hens, but don't keep more than one. You may get away with it, but more likely you'll have injured hens. There is little romance in the world of fowl... and roosters are rough. If you end up with more than one rooster, you'll want to pass him off to a local farmer or put him in the pot. Independent, local feed stores, farm stores and farmers are the best sources for properly sexed chicks.)

Specific advice varies greatly based on where you live: urban, suburban, rural and variations of these. If one is extremely limited by regulations, time, know-how or just by space, it may be a better idea to have a skill you can trade. Gardening for self-sufficiency is very difficult, and involves a steep learning curve. That said, anyone can learn to do it,,, but you've got to have the time (to both learn and farm) and space.

Anyone with even an acre or two can easily plant a fantastic garden as well as raise chickens and even goats. But zoning restrictions, local regulations and covenants are usually the problem.

BamaTrooper
03-24-2009, 11:55
Whatever I can grow indoors. Tomatoes, Serranos, Garlic, Onions, Green Beans, Okra.... Stockpiling carbs, Pintos, Dried Peas.

Won't cultivate any part of my acre because doing so will draw attention to myself. Also, having an outdoor garden means I'd have to cage the garden to keep out the birds and rabbits.

I like the idea of growing flax, but I suspect it takes a lot of land.

Wouldn't some birds help keep bugs down and don't you eat rabbit?

Short Cut
03-24-2009, 12:16
I'm fortunate to have enough land to be able to grow livestock (cattle, sheep, hogs, chickens for eggs and meat), although for year round livestock I must supplement with baled or bagged feed. I'm not currently raising rabbits, but have done some serious reading on the topic and could get into that pretty quickly if need be.

We grow a variety of vegetables year round in our garden and are harvesting more fruit year by year.

I'm pretty confident that what I don't raise I could barter for as I live in a rural community with wide ranging crops.

RWBlue
04-30-2012, 20:43
bump...

BlackhawkFan
05-01-2012, 06:24
Wouldn't some birds help keep bugs down and don't you eat rabbit?

Around here the birds go after the moisture in the produce.

I'll eat rabbit, but I won't raise them.

lawman800
05-01-2012, 20:27
mitchshrader “what would you eat if you had to grow it?”

Steak.:whistling:

Bravo 1
05-02-2012, 10:58
The stuff we have in our garden, which is canned to last until the next harvest.

The neighbors are farmers as well.

We don't rely on store bought, sterile seeds. Pretty handy when you cannot get anymore from the store for whatever reason.

Neighbors have cattle and a few pigs, I have skills and security covered.

We have more water than we can drink,,ever.

As long as disease doesn't get us and the hoardes of zombes don't over run us, we will be fine.

Doubtful we will ever be sitting around waiting on a FEMA check.

RWBlue
05-02-2012, 13:32
I think the hardest thing for many people would be only cooking what they grow. We have become accustomed to buying imported food.

Brian Lee
05-02-2012, 15:12
Already done it years ago.

I grew cows.... And they're gone now because I've already eaten them.

Carry16
05-02-2012, 19:01
Mother Earth News has claimed for many years that you can feed a family of 4 off 1 acre of land. I have 4 acres, and I know it would be one hell of a chore to try to keep after 4 acres of produce.

http://www.motherearthnews.com/modern-homesteading/victory-garden-zmaz73jazraw.aspx

bdcochran
05-02-2012, 20:50
I don't have a vegetable garden anymore or chickens. I am down to one/two people.

Years ago, my son wanted trees planted. The roots took out what would be the garden area. So, now I have 2 lemon, 1 tangerine, 4 guava, 1 cheromoya, 2 santa rosa plum, 1 lime, 1 pomegranate. Of course, I get a lot of excess fruit. The guavas are put up and fully eaten up within months.

The problem with a vegetable garden is that things tend to come in at the same time, so I would end up giving away stuff. I remember one day when my son was in the 4th grade. I took in enough tomatoes so that every kid in class got 3 large ones and a handful of cherry tomatoes.

Unfortunately, my neighbors do not have gardens or fruit trees.

CitizenOfDreams
05-02-2012, 23:21
Back in Mother Russia, my family grew potatos, tomatos, cucumbers, pumpkins, squash, carrots, radish, apples, cherries, raspberries, strawberries...

CitizenOfDreams
05-02-2012, 23:25
The problem with a vegetable garden is that things tend to come in at the same time, so I would end up giving away stuff.

Many vegetables will store for months in their natural form (and much longer if you freeze or can them).

kirgi08
05-03-2012, 03:18
Stagger your planting dates.The slower grows go in first ect.We've already got our garden started.'08.

TangoFoxtrot
05-03-2012, 04:52
Corn, beans, beets, carrots, , spinach, broccoli, , asparagus, tomatoes, strawberries, apples, pears, peppers. Perhaps anything else I could grow.

SFCSMITH(RET)
05-03-2012, 06:35
The problem with a vegetable garden is that things tend to come in at the same time, so I would end up giving away stuff. I remember one day when my son was in the 4th grade. I took in enough tomatoes so that every kid in class got 3 large ones and a handful of cherry tomatoes.



Canning. You do what you can to try to not have everything come in at once, but it's a fact, harvest season is a pretty darn busy time. We put up about 2500 quarts last fall, with 5 people, 3 pressure canners, 4 waterbath canners.

Lowdown3
05-03-2012, 07:17
Every year for about the past 7 we have grown enough green beans, potatoes and sweet corn to process and can (glass jar) for the majority of our vegetable use for the year. This is rounded out by smaller crops of fresh veggies in season- brocolli, some snow peas, cabbage in the winter and carrots.

Summer time variables are squash and zucchini, tomatoes and peppers fresh. Been more than a few years since we've grown enough tomatoes to process them for storage. Peppers aren't usually a huge crop so we often times just freeze a bunch of them.

Meat (goat, chicken, rabbit and a deer once a year) is usually put in the freezer. We have an AE system so power isn't a problem. Freezer size is however, so meat is constantly being rotated. Canned chicken a couple times when we did a big run of meat birds and it didn't come out bad, but we prefer to freeze meat where possible.

Fruits are mainly apples and pears. Plum trees have slacked off the last couple years as we have been fighting plum circulio. And for being the "Peach State" our peach trees don't do crap unless you spray the living heck out of them, and I'll only go so far there.

Started drying apples last year, usually we just can a couple hundred quarts of applesauce every year. The Excalibur works well but it's nothing like the consistency of true commercially dehydrated fruit IMO.

Get your soil amendments done now, get your soil tested, start developing experience working with YOUR soil, learn the planting dates for YOUR exact location, start experiencing growing a big portion of your food. It takes a LONG time to get where you can do that. It took us YEARS. "On the job" training while starving is NOT the time to make your mistakes, make them NOW while you have a safety net.

Lowdown3

glockaviator
05-03-2012, 11:59
Depends on the land and climate. Around here, without irrigation, all you can grow is wheat, hay and cattle.

rgregoryb
05-03-2012, 15:28
Beer!

Toyman
05-04-2012, 05:50
For those that have stored seeds, but are not yet growing stuff, it's not always as easy as it sounds.

At my previous house, I had a garden. The squash, cucumbers, peppers, and rhubarb grew great. I could not get the corn, radishes, beats, or carrots to grow very well.

So my point is, learn what you can grow now, not later.

Bravo 1
05-04-2012, 13:45
yes, and learn how to actually make heirloom seeds work so you can eat next year.