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chowchow
03-29-2008, 09:38
MANILA, Philippines (AP) -- Philippine activists warn about possible riots. Aid agencies across Asia worry how they will feed the hungry. Governments dig deeper every day to fund subsidies.

A sharp rise in the price of rice is hitting consumer pocketbooks and raising fears of public turmoil in the many parts of Asia where rice is a staple.

Part of a surge in global food costs, rice prices on world markets have jumped 50 percent in the past two months and at least doubled since 2004. Experts blame rising fuel and fertilizer expenses as well as crops curtailed by disease, pests and climate change. There are concerns prices could rise a further 40 percent in coming months.

The higher prices have already sparked protests in the Philippines, where a government official has asked the public to save leftover rice. In Cambodia, Prime Minister Hun Sen ordered a ban on rice exports Wednesday to curb rising prices at home. Vietnamese exporters and farmers are stockpiling rice in expectation of further price increases.

Prestoline Suyat of the May One Labor Movement, a left-wing workers group, warned that "hunger and poverty may eventually lead to riots."

The neediest are hit hardest.

Rodolfo de Lima, a 42-year-old parking lot attendant in Manila, said "my family will go hungry" if prices continue to rise.


"If your family misses a meal, you really don't know what you can do, but I won't do anything bad," said de Lima, whose right foot was amputated after he was shot during a 1985 gang war.

Others might not be so restrained, said Domingo Casarte, 41, a street vendor.

"There are people who are hotheaded," he said. "When people get trapped, I can't say what they will do."

The U.S. Department of Agriculture forecasts global rice stocks for 2007-08 at 72 million tons, the lowest since 1983-84 and about half of the peak in 2000-01.

The higher prices are stretching the budgets of aid agencies providing rice to North Korea and other countries, particularly with donations already falling.

Jack Dunford, head of a consortium in Thailand helping more than 140,000 refugees from military-ruled Myanmar, said soaring rice prices and a slumping U.S. dollar are forcing cuts in already meager food aid.

"This rice price is just killing us," he said. "This is a very vulnerable group of people under threat."

China is among several countries in the region that subsidize rice prices, an increasingly expensive proposition.

Rice prices have almost doubled in Bangladesh in just a year, sparking resentment but no unrest yet. Repeated floods and a severe cyclone last year have cut production, forcing the government to increase imports.

In Vietnam, a major rice exporter, the crop has been hit by a virus called tungro and infestations of the brown planthopper insect.

Farmers there say they are not benefiting from the higher prices.

"The rice price has gone up 50 percent over the past three months, but I'm not making any more money because I have to pay double for fertilizer, insecticides and labor costs," said Nguyen Thi Thu, 46, a farmer in Ha Tay province, just outside Hanoi.

Another farmer, Cao Thi Thuy, 37, in Nam Dinh province, 120 kilometers (75 miles) south of Hanoi, said exporters have actually been paying less for rice over the last week.

"If the world prices are going up still, then Vietnamese rice-exporting companies are benefiting, not us," she said. "They tell us that now weather is better, and rice can grow more easily, so we should not expect higher prices."

Philippine President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo, worried about anything that could spark a "people power" revolt against her, is assuring the public that rice won't run out or skyrocket in price during the traditionally lean months of July to September.

This week, she arranged the purchase of up to 1.5 million tons from Vietnam. She also has ordered a crackdown on price manipulation, hoarding and profiteering on subsidized rice, and will hold a food summit April 4.

Things are so tight that Agriculture Secretary Arthur Yap has asked people not to throw away leftover rice and urged fast-food restaurants, which normally give customers a cup of rice with meals, to offer a half-cup option to cut waste.

The Philippines is facing "a perfect storm," said Sen. Mar Roxas, president of the Liberal Party. Problems coping with rising rice prices are compounded by higher oil prices and a U.S. economic downturn, which could reduce the money sent home to families by Filipinos working in the United States. Such remittances underpin the economy.

Philippine farmers say the country, which has become the world's largest importer of rice after being an exporter in the early 1970s, has shot itself in the foot by developing some former rice paddies for housing and golf courses and planting more lucrative crops on others.

One Asian country, Japan, is encouraging cuts in rice production. Rice prices there have been falling in recent months as people eat less rice and more bread


Related link: http://edition.cnn.com/2008/BUSINESS/03/27/asia.food.ap/index.html

isuzu
03-29-2008, 09:45
It's getting there. Haven't you noticed that the price of bread and flour has suddenly increased in North America?

One factor in the possible rice shortage is how we waste rice (and food). When I was still living in the Philippines, I was disgusted whenever the waiter/busboy cleans the tables on restaurants with half-finished bowls of rice.

Another is climate change, farms being converted to industrial and residential areas - not considering that we need more land for food to feed an ever growing population. Another is the incompetence of NIA being one of the corrupt agencies of the government. Our rice yield per hectare in the Philippines hasn't really improved.

A lot of wheat farms in the US have been converted to corn for biofuel, and we Visayans wouldn't have a problem with eating corn grits. :supergrin: There are also quite a number of wheat farms in Canada that are being converted to canola farms for bio-diesel.

Shrinking farmlands and a growing population is a very bad equation. Food prices will continue to increase and would only stabilize after 10 years when all the food problems have been adressed.

Fights already have broke out in some impoverished parts of the world.

chowchow
03-29-2008, 11:08
Signs of the times . Global warming din plays a part. Basta overdeveloped at overpopulation ang mundo, may breaking point talaga.

chowchow
03-29-2008, 11:18
http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=story_25-2-2004_pg5_15

aztig
03-29-2008, 20:55
http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=story_25-2-2004_pg5_15


Isn't the news too old for the current event? Wednesday, February 25, 2004

atmarcella
03-29-2008, 21:39
coupled with the unimpeded growth of population here in the islands. things will get pretty nasty. so guys watch your six.

bulm540
03-29-2008, 22:28
Global warming my foot, I'm freezing my arse overhere.

isuzu
03-29-2008, 23:44
Global warming my foot, I'm freezing my arse overhere.

We'll have snow tomorrow and a high of only -4 Celsius. It's the worst winter in 15 years, according to meteorologists.

One thing we have to watch out - a large chunk of ice broke off and melted in the Antartica. It was totally unexpected, according to scientists.

mikey177
03-30-2008, 01:20
After reading this thread, I was suddenly reminded of the movie "Soylent Green." Scary thought. I better start planting more edible plants in our backyard.

gen1
03-30-2008, 02:04
We'll have snow tomorrow and a high of only -4 Celsius. It's the worst winter in 15 years, according to meteorologists.

One thing we have to watch out - a large chunk of ice broke off and melted in the Antartica. It was totally unexpected, according to scientists.

my wife is on a weeklong visit to chicago. It snowed daw last thursday, much to her delight (but she'll be on her way back to the Phil in a few hours so she won't be there too long to regret the cold temp :supergrin:)

CX9
03-30-2008, 02:09
Just another charade to remove the spotlight from Jun Lozada to Rice now, what's next Elvis is still alive and singing at Casino Filipino

chowchow
03-30-2008, 05:05
Pina horde yata ng mga rice dealers, lol

nitrox920
03-30-2008, 05:11
the problem in the philippines is that the agri sector has the wrong policy as follows:

1. CARP land reform
2. CARP land reform
3. CARP land reform

bertud ng putik
03-30-2008, 07:11
walang rice crisis, tanungin nyo yung biyenan ni arthur yap, may negosyong bigasan yun eh.

bulm540
03-30-2008, 09:20
the problem in the philippines is that the agri sector has the wrong policy as follows:

1. CARP land reform
2. CARP land reform
3. CARP land reform

BIG DITTO!!!!!!!!!!!

chowchow
03-30-2008, 10:35
I hope nga its not true . If its real then the poor masses are the hardest hit. Anyway may alterative naman gaya ng kamote and kamoteng kahoy at corn grits.

Allegra
03-30-2008, 17:05
I hope nga its not true . If its real then the poor masses are the hardest hit. Anyway may alterative naman gaya ng kamote and kamoteng kahoy at corn grits.


No kidding!
Camote is the vihtavuori N310 of carbs , very clean at fast burning!
Ang galing when training
Plus you cant overeat it....yuck
It doeant cause me gas though , baka sabi lang ng matanda yun

choi_tan2000
03-30-2008, 20:05
yeah i agree with all of you sir's,

i actualy dont considers other foods like camote an alternative beacuse, eto naman talga ay kinakain natin, kaso naiba ang orientation antin mga pinoy on what food realy to eat.

imagine, how often we saw rotten camote's, saba (banana) other saging in the markets. na dapat ay yun ang kinakain natin.

me nabasa ako, the fruits vegetable na kinakain natin ay yung tumutubo at lumalaki sa paligin natin and not from the other country.. but to our dismay, most filipinos dont want to eat camote , saba, casava. ala na puro apple at kung anu anu junk food kinakain natin..

if well try to eat other varieties other than rice i think there will be no shortgae..

just imagine how many tons of rotten foods in local markets?? while we lack our supply of rice not only rice but other commodites.


just me sirs.

Clusterbomb
03-30-2008, 20:21
After reading this thread, I was suddenly reminded of the movie "Soylent Green." Scary thought. I better start planting more edible plants in our backyard.

Hey I remember that too! You'd have to get to the end of the film to know what every moviegoer suspected all along- "SOYLENT GREEN IS PEOPLE!!!"

Wow, if it ever comes to that, that would be the end of civilization as we know it. I hope I never get to see that in my lifetime.

BTW, Charlton Heston did another doomsday scenario film- "The Omega Man". I just can't recall which came first.

chowchow
03-30-2008, 22:06
Solyent Green , I remember that movie. Naging biscuits ang patay na mga tao.

isuzu
03-30-2008, 22:09
the problem in the philippines is that the agri sector has the wrong policy as follows:

1. CARP land reform
2. CARP land reform
3. CARP land reform

You're right, Nitrox! People in Negros are now hesitant to invest in new farm equipment because the stupid CARP could suddenly be implemented in your land.

It's a wait and see attidude as to who would blink first.

antediluvianist
03-31-2008, 03:47
Actually, the rate of rice production has been growing by 1.9% a year, which is not bad.

But the rate of population growth is 2.3% a year, some experts claim closer to 2.4% a year.

There you have it. Sure, hoarding hurts, corruption hurts, distribution inefficiencies hurt; but the fundamental fact is that although our rice ouput increases significantly, we simply produce too many babies, especially the poorest people who are the least able to provide for them.

Duckman1975
03-31-2008, 03:56
Solyent Green , I remember that movie. Naging biscuits ang patay na mga tao.

I remember that film also can't forget it because we were eating M.Y. SAN biscuits when we were watching it, never look at biscuits the same again after that movie.

Clusterbomb
03-31-2008, 23:59
we simply produce too many babies, especially the poorest people who are the least able to provide for them.

Haaay naku! When will our poor people ever learn the virtue of responsible parenthood? For a lot of them, children are the key "para mahango kami sa kahirapan". The more, the better- daw.

What no one among them seems to mind is the fact that you have feed, clothe and educate them first before they can even be your financial savior (assuming of course, that they don't grow up to be SOB ingrates) in the future. But how can you do that if you're dirt poor?

Kaya ayun, they end up as additional burden to our government. A lot of our problems today are of our own doing.

chowchow
04-01-2008, 00:09
Family Planning , di ba during Marcos time pina educate ang mga kababayan natin. Walang silbi pala . The country's pop is now almost 100 million, naku!

atmarcella
04-01-2008, 09:26
come to think of it. do you guys know of an equatorial country that is predominantly catholic that is of first world status?

antediluvianist
04-01-2008, 17:48
rice problem as explained by Lito Banayo of Malaya

Land, water, numbers

CONSIDER these: The Philippines is all of 114, 830 square miles, dispersed amongst 7,101 islands, some of them with absolutely no water, being nothing more than coral atolls. Thailand has 198, 270 square miles in one contiguous whole, but for a smattering of small islands frequented by tourists in the Andaman Sea. Vietnam is closer in size to our country, 126,184 square miles, but like Thailand, one aggregate land mass, discounting atolls in its north.

For the visual appreciation of many Filipinos who have traveled to California, that stretch of land is all of 158,693 square miles. One state of the US of A, and hardly any of that disengaged from one contiguous mainland.

Those who wonder why the supply of rice is a perennial problem should bother to consider those simple numbers. There is not that much land in this country. Sure, we see stretches of land that are fallow or unutilized. Travelling from Antipolo to Tanay, we see hectares upon hectares of land where only cogon grows, stretching well into the foothills of the Sierra Madre. Why don’t we plant rice there?

One, it is hilly, not suitable for rice or any crop for that matter, unless we could build terraces like our hardy Ifugao ancestors did in the Montanosa. But that requires water, lots of it, and we have no ample sources in those parts. We cannot plant rice in the sands of the Ilocos; watermelons perhaps, but not rice, nor in the craggy slopes of Surigao’s bald mountains, bald because of high ferrous content in the soil that turns it into a picturesque landscape of rust, but with no economic use.
What about water? It takes about 500 liters of water to produce one kilogram of rice. Where do we get the water in places like Cebu, which is all of mountains and sea besides? No great river exists in Cebu, Bohol or in the Ilocos. There is the long Cagayan River, which is not even 300 miles long. Its waters have been tapped to irrigate the Cagayan Valley, and Isabela, as a result, competes with Nueva Ecija for the distinction of being the country’s rice granary. Guess who made the irrigation systems of Isabela? Elpidio Quirino, that’s who. Fifty-seven years ago.

The Cagayan and the Agusan rivers are not even in a listing of the world’s 200 longest rivers. In contrast, the Mekong which irrigates Vietnam is all of 2,500 miles, and the Irrawady in Myanmar is 1,300 miles long. Thailand does not have rivers as long, but plenty of wide, water-filled rivers, such as the Chao Phrya, Yom, Chi and the Wong.

Now consider this curious fact. In 1960, when Thailand began exporting students to study at the UP College of Agriculture in Los Baños, they were already producing 8 million tons of rice. We were producing 4.5 million tons only. But our systems were far advanced, our technology better. They simply had more paddies, and more water. They imbibed our systems, learned our technologies, and now they export rice all over the world. Jasmine rice is a byword, whether in Europe or the West Coast, while in the Philippines, middle-class wagwag is gone, and so is poorer macan.

So what am I saying? We never were great at producing rice. Sure our UP agriculture scientists and even our biotechnologists are a cut above the rest, but because neither government nor the people did anything sustained to increase rice production to the point of self-sufficiency, we are where we are, and have chronically been, importing rice to feed an ever-multiplying population.

There were blips, though. The late Rafael Salas was given charge of ensuring rice self-sufficiency by Ferdinand Marcos. Rice after all had always been an explosive political issue. When rice hit 80 centavos per ganta (that’s about two kilos), Garcia lost to Macapagal. When Macapagal imported tons and tons of rice from Thailand, and priced these at a peso per ganta (that’s 47 centavos per kilo), he lost to Marcos. Ah, for the good old days.

So Marcos made his executive secretary the "rice czar" with power to mobilize all of the bureaucracy to ensure self-sufficiency in rice. He did, for three years. And then there was martial law, after a great flood wasted all of Central Luzon. Marcos in that heyday of power got Filipinos to eat a mix of rice and corn. It was awful, but for the Cebuanos and Boholanos, but hey, we survived. Then he launched Masagana 99 under his new boy genius, the chain-smoking Bong Tanco. We again exported a little rice, but at great cost to government finances because farmers took credit for give-away.

So what are we saying? It’s land, which we have little of. It’s water, which we have little of. But it’s numbers of people which we have too many of.
In 1960, there were 27.5 million Filipinos and there were 25 million Thais. That was 48 years back, and two generations ago. I just about completed my elementary schooling, now my kids have finished college and a grandson is about to enter pre-school. Sometime in the late 70’s, Thailand seriously curbed its population growth.
The result? We are now almost 90 million people. Thailand has 68 million people. As we said in our Saturday column, while the Thais were growing their economy and decreasing their numbers, we were growing our population too fast and growing our economy too slow.

Our per-hectare rice production is higher than Thailand’s, and even the IRRI attests so. We can produce marginally more, and cut costs of production likewise, if we used more organic fertilizers and rice inoculants that our own UP Los Baños developed. But these are not enough. We can introduce high-cost but high-yielding hybrid palay varieties, but again, these are not enough and are difficult to extensively propagate.

That is the simple politics of rice in this benighted land of far too many people.

http://www.malaya.com.ph/apr01/edbanayo.htm

lapu2x
04-01-2008, 20:01
Rice warehouse in Cebu empty

CEBU CITY -- Despite pronouncements by government officials that there is no rice shortage in the country, authorities inspecting rice warehouses found at least one to be empty Tuesday.

Members of the Presidential Anti-Smuggling Group (PASG) and the National Food Authority (NFA) inspected three warehouses of rice traders Tuesday. They found one, which has a capacity of 50,000 sacks, to be empty by noon Tuesday.

NFA 7 senior investigator Emmanuel T. Benjamin Sr. said there are rice stocks but these are "scarce and not enough."

But in a forum Tuesday afternoon, NFA 7 Director Danilo Bunabon reiterated that there is no rice shortage. He said rice stocks are enough to last for another four months.

Last year, NFA imported about 41 vessels, equivalent to four million sacks, of rice. Bunabon said that farmers are expected to produce 7.2 million metric tons of rice in the entire country for the current harvest season.

Bunabon said that the inter-agency task force that will monitor rice stocks and distribution will be formally created and launched Wednesday.

Benjamin, meanwhile, said that with the alarming situation on the rice supply, NFA and PASG will continue monitoring warehouses.

The Philippine National Police has directed all regional offices to coordinate with local agencies to see how policemen can help in the campaign against hoarding of rice supply.

Cebu Provincial Police Office Director Carmelo Valmoria has instructed his deputy for operations, Superintendent Erson Digal, to get in touch with the NFA, Department of Agriculture (DA) and the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) to see how police can help.

Valmoria said they will establish the location of rice and corn warehouses and will provide the necessary assistance to the NFA in their inspections.

He said that if they receive any information on hoarding of rice, they will act in coordination with the NFA.

Jojo Collantes, PASG-Cebu deputy director, said they inspected the warehouses Tuesday with a mission order issued by Bunabon.

Grains Confederation of the Philippines (Grecon) president Teresa Pepito Alegado, however, warned that inspecting and monitoring warehouses of rice traders in Cebu might be construed as harassment.

Alegado said traders might not buy rice from other rice producing provinces for fear that their stocks will be seized on accusations of hoarding.

Alegado suggested that government start monitoring palay buyers and millers, who she said are controlling the stocks and prices of rice in the country.

She said millers are only selling well-milled and fancy rice and not the regular milled rice that is affordable to the middle class. As a result, she said, the middle class are now buying NFA rice, which are intended for indigent families.

At the Cebu Provincial Board (PB), at least two PB members insisted Tuesday that there is rice shortage in the province, citing the increase in prices in the market.

PB Member Victor Maambong said the high prices of rice in the market, which is now close to P40 per kilo, indicates there is shortage in supply. Board Member Juan Bolo agreed.

The PB invited last Monday NFA assistant program manager Jesus Donque, DA 7 executive director Ricardo Oblena and Provincial Agriculturist Necias Vicoy to shed light on the rice situation in Cebu province.

"Traders say there is crisis in rice. No. There is no such thing. Rice might just be more expensive by P2 to P3," Oblena told PB members.

Maambong, however, criticized the officials for deceiving the public. He said that if indeed the supply is enough, then prices shouldn't have increased abruptly.

Maambong urged residents to be vigilant against rice hoarders and immediately report to authorities. He said he received reports of a rice monopoly in the towns of Dumanjug and Argao.

Tuesday, Vietnamese ship mv Bhin Puoc arrived in Cebu carrying 6,750 metric tons of rice for the NFA, said Dr. Emmanuel Labella, Bureau of Quarantine 7 head.

At the Bureau of Customs (BOC) Port of Cebu, the agency said it collected millions of pesos in duties and taxes from the rice importation of the Philippine International Trading Corp., a government agency.

Florante Ricarte, Port of Cebu assistant assessment chief, said PITC imported rice from Vietnam for the account of several farmers' cooperatives. It has paid the shipment's tariff, which is 50 percent of the rice value.

Ricarte said that the PITC payments increased Port of Cebu's revenue collections for March. (EOB/With MEA and GMD/Sun.Star Cebu)

http://www.sunstar.com.ph/static/net/2008/04/02/rice.warehouse.in.cebu.empty.html

isuzu
04-01-2008, 20:14
Family Planning , di ba during Marcos time pina educate ang mga kababayan natin. Walang silbi pala . The country's pop is now almost 100 million, naku!

As I have said in my previous posts regarding population control, the government is walking the tightrope in fully implementing the program.

The government is concerned that the Catholic church will turn against any ruling party who will fully implement family control.

lapu2x
04-01-2008, 21:42
re family planning - Even among males the idea of vasectomy is not very acceptable. This I think would the ideal method the govt should be pushing for - males being able to impregnate even when elderly, less complications, less logistical support needed, and earlier return to work compared to tubal ligation in women.

nitrox920
04-01-2008, 21:57
the population is not the problem.

Its the Stupid dumb government policies that creates the problem. if the govermnet just sets its policies in the right direction to be a self-sufficient then I believe this present crisis wouldnt happened.

Food security should have been the priority of our governemt, then Everything else will just follow.

Our agricultural sectors was never given fisrt priority considering that 85% of our industry is directly connected with agriculture.

isuzu
04-02-2008, 20:09
re family planning - Even among males the idea of vasectomy is not very acceptable. This I think would the ideal method the govt should be pushing for - males being able to impregnate even when elderly, less complications, less logistical support needed, and earlier return to work compared to tubal ligation in women.


Ehem. May bagong pills na daw for men. :)

antediluvianist
04-02-2008, 20:33
Make the Thais support 30 million more people than they have right now, like we have to, and they wouldn't be exporting all that much rice.

There will be 210 million Filipinos in 2050 according to the World Bank figures.
Of course population is part of the problem, not just in rice but in many other things wrong with this country. Let the church support all these people. Let the bishops sell their jewels.

nitrox920
04-02-2008, 21:42
Church to support the population.??? hahaha Its even asking donation from rich patron and as payback condemming this rich patron indirectly.. stupid logic. :dunno:

Today sa front page nga inquirer April3 " 29 bishop urges Congress to extend CARP". What do this priest want to achieve.... a Zimbabwe agri-economic collapse. ...:steamed::steamed::steamed: zibabwe being a major food supplier before of africa to a present day basket case food beggars. the main culprit no other than land reform. they killed the goose that laid the golden egg.

This priest should redirect their logic if they still have one. I dont know if they are blind or plain dumb....wala na nga bigas sa pilipinas kasi sa land reform ipa extend pa nga mga buwisit na mga pare. :steamed:

Ersatz0906
04-03-2008, 17:56
the problem in the philippines is that the agri sector has the wrong policy as follows:

1. CARP land reform
2. CARP land reform
3. CARP land reform

tama ka dyan....
people are trying to save their land so they dont plant palay for 2 or 3 years or maybe more, just to show that their land was long before converted to pasture land for their cows. Pasture land is exempted from CARP also industrial or residential.

Ersatz0906
04-03-2008, 18:02
also, my close friend asking me if he will sell his farm or not...
a certain tabacco company will buy his farm for 350,000 per hectare daw.
sayo mga sir, sell ba?

about 100 hectares of palay land to be converted to tabacco plantation

antediluvianist
04-03-2008, 18:30
"Church to support the population.??? hahaha Its even asking donation from rich patron and as payback condemming this rich patron indirectly.. stupid logic. "

What's stupid is that apparently you don't understand sarcasm.

bulm540
04-03-2008, 20:02
also, my close friend asking me if he will sell his farm or not...
a certain tabacco company will buy his farm for 350,000 per hectare daw.
sayo mga sir, sell ba?

about 100 hectares of palay land to be converted to tabacco plantation

I though you were only allowed 7 hectares with palay land due to Land reform?

Ersatz0906
04-03-2008, 23:16
I though you were only allowed 7 hectares with palay land due to Land reform?


yes, thats why they convert some to pasture land for livestock para ma exempt sa Land reform....also malaki family nila, Im not sure pero tag 5hectares each member of the family...

chowchow
04-04-2008, 10:58
Disciplina ang bayan. At least walang riots kung ganon. 3 kilos ang limit, okey lang basta happy.



http://i152.photobucket.com/albums/s173/patrick_bretsch/NFAApril32008.jpg

http://i152.photobucket.com/albums/s173/patrick_bretsch/r4070185624.jpg

Re: AFP/NFA Cooperation
« Reply #1 on: Today at 10:25:39 am »

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From philstar.com


Troops to secure NFA distribution
By James Mananghaya
Friday, April 4, 2008

Troops were deployed yesterday to guard the distribution of rice in Metro Manila.

Capt. Carlo Ferrer, Armed Forces National Capital Region Command (NCRCOM) spokesman, said soldiers in 21 military trucks will help National Food Authority (NFA) personnel hand out packs of rice in Gagalangin, Capulong and Smokey Mountain in Tondo, Manila; and Barangays Commonwealth and Vasra in Quezon City.

“NCRCOM would also provide security aside from assisting in the transport of NFA rice to distribution areas in highly populated and depressed areas in the NCR,” he said.

More military vehicles will be deployed to augment the NFA within the week on orders of President Arroyo, Ferrer said.

Meanwhile, Justice Secretary Raul Gonzalez said rice hoarders will be charged with economic sabotage, which carries a life sentence.

“Our first initiative is to ask for the help of Filipinos who can give us information because we are not here to witch-hunt,” he said.

Gonzalez said government agents had started swooping down on illegal rice traders in Cebu City and that 111 other traders in Luzon were also on his list.

Gonzalez said he had ordered agents from the National Bureau of Investigation to “be very rigid in looking” for evidence against rice hoarders.

Gonzalez said only rice hoarders were being targeted, and that traders and warehouse owners found to be legitimate need not fear.

“This is an emergency situation, they should understand,” he said.

Police nationwide are also under orders to arrest rice hoarders and traders diverting government-subsidized rice to the market.

Director Silverio Alarcio Jr., Philippine National Police operations director, said police will also guard rice storage facilities, government food warehouses, and NFA-accredited rice warehouses against possible pilferage.

“If it is necessary that we should tail all trucks hauling NFA rice to ensure that the cargo does not end up in illegal warehouses, we will do that and hit hard on the hoarders who are causing this artificial crisis,” he said.

Alarcio said police will also help the Department of Trade and Industry, Department of Agriculture, NFA and local government units in monitoring prices of basic commodities, especially rice.

“Police action is being initiated to preempt the possible impact on peace and order of the increase in prices of rice and other basic commodities,” he said.

GMA inspects rice outlet

President Arroyo and NFA officials inspected a rice outlet in Manila yesterday and found that it does not have the necessary papers.

“This is not a raid,” she told reporters. “We’re here to see how the inspection is done. The rice must be hoarded if they are not recorded.”

The Isabela Greenfields Corp. at the corner of Figueroa and Perdigones streets in Paco, Manila was found to lack records on their rice inventory.

The warehouse had 7,733 sacks of rice, but the firm’s record book indicated that only 1,300 sacks were delivered.

No rice shortage –NFA

Unscrupulous traders are depicting a scenario of an unfolding rice crisis to panic the public and take advantage of the situation, the NFA said yesterday.

Speaking to reporters at the Usapang Daungan sa Danarra hotel, NFA spokesman Rex Estoperez said the NFA and the police are inspecting warehouses in Metro Manila to prevent the hoarding of rice.

“Speculation is again at work,” he said. “There is no shortage of rice, we have enough stocks.”

Estoperez said dishonest traders are trying to justify the existence of a rice crisis to raise prices.

Speculation has triggered panic buying among consumers, leading to an artificial rice shortage, he added.

Estoperez said the Senate Blue Ribbon committee had already investigated the existence of the rice cartel during the time of then Sen. Teofisto Guingona Jr.

“Up to this time the result of the investigation was not released,” he said.

As of today the NFA has a rice buffer stock good for 15 days in anticipation of any disaster or calamity and lean months, Estoperez said.

Mosquito Gang

In Isabela, sources said the price of rice was being manipulated by a number of businessmen who have reportedly cornered most of the rice produced in Cagayan Valley.

These traders, known as the Mosquito Gang, hoard the palay and bring them out when the price of rice has skyrocketed, according to accredited palay buyers.

Sources said rice prices usually go up a few weeks after the harvest season or when the locally produced rice was already at their disposal.

Aid for rice farmers – Pimentel

Sen. Aquilino Pimentel Jr. said Filipino farmers should receive aid from their government, given the rising cost of production for rice, corn, sugar and other crops.

Soaring prices of fertilizer and crop losses have made it increasingly difficult for Filipino farmers to produce rice and earn a reasonable profit, he added.

Pimentel said it is common to see subsistence farmers unable to pay irrigation fees to the government or to repay their loans to usurers or banks due to mounting production costs, poor harvest or crop failures.

“Worse, they may be compelled to convert their rice field for planting to other crops which are less costly to produce but yield more income,” he said.

Without government incentives, Filipino farmers could not be motivated to produce more rice and take advantage of the benefits of modern farm technology, Pimentel said.

On the other hand, Sen. Francis Escudero decried the announcement of President Arroyo last Tuesday night that the import tariff on rice will be retained.

“This is lamentable because if the tariff is passed on to the consumers the price of rice will shoot through the roof at between P46 and P48 a kilo,” he said.

Escudero said retaining the rice tariff was motivated by the desire to “spruce up” the government’s revenue report card to continue booking NFA tariff payments as revenues.

“This window dressing will pad tax collection by about P30 billion, through the ridiculous practice of treating the (Department of Budget Management) releases for rice duties as Customs collection, which is a self-deluding exercise because it merely transfers money from the government’s right to pocket to the left,” he said.

Mrs. Arroyo cannot order retroactive spending and charge it to last year’s national budget because the 2008 General Appropriations Act has already taken effect, Escudero said.

Meanwhile, Pimentel criticized the World Bank yesterday for discouraging the grant of state subsidies to rice farmers.

“The World Bank should explain why it says it is ‘ruinous’ for our government to subsidize our rice farmers, but not when Japan, Thailand, the US and other countries subsidize their farmers,” he said. — with Cecille Suerte Felipe, Perseus Echeminada, Charlie Lagasca, Christina Mendez, Paolo Romero, Mike Frialde

horge
04-04-2008, 17:12
Hey, is that one of the AFP's new KIA trucks in the photo?

bul45
04-04-2008, 18:18
rice crisis daw! in the provinces, at least in ours, NFA gave 3 kilos of NFA rice to ALL grade school sudents in govt elemmentary schools during the whole month of march. curiously, the NFA was limiting each buyer to 3 kgs of rice which eventually dropped to 2 kgs per person. then, out of the blue talks of rice crisis started cropping up. to add insult to injury, ngayong tag-ani pa! Who are they trying to fool?

mikey177
04-04-2008, 21:02
Hey, is that one of the AFP's new KIA trucks in the photo?

Yes, I believe it is, and from the fully-loaded look of the rear portion of the truck, it looks like they are using it in the rice distribution campaign.

nitrox920
04-05-2008, 07:25
by the way.... how prepared are you for the coming food crisis. with the increase of the prices of basic commodities.. What are you doing to prepare for any eventualities.

mikey177
04-05-2008, 18:43
^What are realistic worst-case scenarios for this food crisis? Rationing? I can live with rationing, we don't eat much during mealtimes anyway.

Rioting? I hope it will not come to this, but if people could be incited to assault Malacanang like what happened on May 1 some years ago, then who knows. What can we do to prepare for rioting anyway?

chowchow
04-05-2008, 20:43
Is that rationing of 3kilos per day to each person buying? Is this only in Luzon areas ? How about the rest of the country?

CatsMeow
04-05-2008, 23:12
Hehe I just had lunch at a Chinese restaurant at the basement of SM Manila a while ago. Standard fare for me (from my old days working here) is a plate of fried rice with salty fish and dried string beans. Ate every grain on the plate, all by myself.:supergrin: Took me a while to finish the pot of tea too (no one to share it with).:supergrin:

Glock_19_9x19
04-06-2008, 19:45
:steamed: Yung binibilhan ko ng P1200/sack ng sinandomeng rice naging
P1600/sack na..

atmarcella
04-06-2008, 20:50
1700 na ang dinorado. the problem is the rice for the dogs. before i was able to get 1000/sack. ngayon i dunno.

chowchow
04-06-2008, 20:52
Sa third year HS years ko, we planted rice in rice paddies as part of our Practical Arts. We prepped the paddies and did the mano mano from seeding to planting in knee- deep mud. Then we used insecticides then harvest after 3-4 months if I can still remember right. We had two types , the regular white rice and the sweet (pilit). We harvested almost 8 sacks. The final prize was we cooked and tasted the harvested rice . Ang sarap ng fresh rice . The experience is so valuable . Now I know how it is really hard to be a farmer. My greatest respect to them. One thing I hate was getting dirty early in the morning and fearing for those leeches, hehehe.

gen1
04-07-2008, 06:36
what's frightening is that we are in the harvest months. come the rainy season, that's when the price of rice will really skyrocket.

chowchow
04-07-2008, 09:42
Mga kapatid, na mention ang RP dito sa report. Mag Kentucky Pizza nalang tayo.


Expect more higher food prices folks

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://www.worldnetdaily.com/index.p...w&pageId=60480

Rice, fertilizer shortages, food costs, higher energy prices equal world crisis
Posted: April 01, 2008
8:59 pm Eastern

© 2008 WorldNetDaily



WASHINGTON – From India to Africa to North Korea to Pakistan and even in New York City, higher grain prices, fertilizer shortages and rising energy costs are combining to spell hunger for millions in what is being characterized as a global "silent famine."

Global food prices, based on United Nations records, rose 35 percent in the last year, escalating a trend that began in 2002. Since then, prices have risen 65 percent.

Last year, according to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization's world food index, dairy prices rose nearly 80 percent and grain 42 percent.

"This is the new face of hunger," said Josetta Sheeran, director of the World Food Program, launching an appeal for an extra $500 million so it could continue supplying food aid to 73 million hungry people this year. "People are simply being priced out of food markets. ... We have never before had a situation where aggressive rises in food prices keep pricing our operations out of our reach."

(Story continues below)


The WFP launched a public appeal weeks ago because the price of the food it buys to feed some of the world's poorest people had risen by 55 percent since last June. By the time the appeal began last week, prices had risen a further 20 percent. That means WFP needs $700 million to bridge the gap between last year's budget and this year's prices. The numbers are expected to continue to rise.

The crisis is widespread and the result of numerous causes – a kind of "perfect storm" leading to panic in many places:

* In Thailand, farmers are sleeping in their fields because thieves are stealing rice, now worth $600 a ton, right out of the paddies.

* Four people were killed in Egypt in riots over subsidized flour that was being sold for profit on the black market.

* There have been food riots in Morocco, Senegal and Cameroon.

* Mexico's government is considering lifting a ban on genetically modified crops, to allow its farmers to compete with the United States.

* Argentina, Kazakhstan and China have imposed restrictions to limit grain exports and keep more of their food at home.

* Vietnam and India, both major rice exporters, have announced further restrictions on overseas sales.

* Violent food protests hit Burkina Faso in February.

* Protesters rallied in Indonesia recently, and media reported deaths by starvation.

* In the Philippines, fast-food chains were urged to cut rice portions to counter a surge in prices.

* Millions of people in India face starvation after a plague of rats overruns a region, as they do cyclically every 50 years.

* Officials in Bangladesh warn of an emerging "silent famine" that threatens to ravage the region.

According to some experts, the worst damage is being done by government mandates and subsidies for "biofuels" that supposedly reduce carbon dioxide emissions and fight climate change. Thirty percent of this year's U.S. grain harvest will go to ethanol distilleries. The European Union, meanwhile, has set a goal of 10 percent bio-fuels for all transportation needs by 2010.

"A huge amount of the world's farmland is being diverted to feed cars, not people," writes Gwynne Dyer, a London-based independent journalist.

He notes that in six of the past seven years the human race has consumed more grain than it grew. World grain reserves last year were only 57 days, down from 180 days a decade ago.

One in four bushels of corn from this year's U.S. crop will be diverted to make ethanol, according to estimates.

"Turning food into fuel for cars is a major mistake on many fronts," said Janet Larsen, director of research at the Earth Policy Institute, an environmental group based in Washington. "One, we're already seeing higher food prices in the American supermarket. Two, perhaps more serious from a global perspective, we're seeing higher food prices in developing countries where it's escalated as far as people rioting in the streets."

Palm oil is also at record prices because of biofuel demands. This has created shortages in Indonesia and Malaysia, where it is a staple.

Nevertheless, despite the recognition that the biofuels industry is adding to a global food crisis, the ethanol industry is popular in the U.S. where farmers enjoy subsidies for the corn crops.

Another contributing factor to the crisis is the demand for more meat in an increasingly prosperous Asia. More grain is used to feed the livestock than is required to feed humans directly in a traditional grain-based diet.

Bad weather is another problem driving the world's wheat stocks to a 30-year low – along with regional droughts and a declining dollar.

"This is an additional setback for the world economy, at a time when we are already going through major turbulence," Angel Gurria, head of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, told Reuters. "But the biggest drama is the impact of higher food prices on the poor."

According to the organization, as well as the U.N., the price of corn could rise 27 percent in the next decade.

John Bruton, the European Union's ambassador to the U.S., predicts the current trend is the beginning of a 10-15 year rise in food costs worldwide.

The rodent plague in India occurs about every half century following the heavy flowering of a local species of bamboo, providing the rodents with a feast of high-protein foliage. Once the rats have ravaged the bamboo, they turn on the crops, consuming hundreds of tons of rice and corn supplies.

Survivors of the previous mautam, which heralded widespread famine in 1958, say they remember areas of paddy fields the size of four soccer fields being devastated overnight.

In Africa, rats are seen as part of the answer to the food shortage. According to Africa News, Karamojongs have resorted to hunting wild rats for survival as famine strikes the area.

Supplies of fertilizer are extremely tight on the worldwide market, contributing to a potential disaster scenario. The Scotsman reports there are virtually no stocks of ammonium nitrate in the United Kingdom.

Global nitrogen is currently in deficit, a situation that is unlikely to change for at least three years, the paper reports.

South Koreans are speculating, as they do annually, on how many North Koreans will starve to death before the fall harvest. But this year promises to be worse than usual.

Severe crop failure in the North and surging global prices for food will mean millions of hungry Koreans.

Roughly a third of children and mothers are malnourished, according to a recent U.N. study. The average 8-year-old in the North is 7 inches shorter and 20 pounds lighter than a South Korean child of the same age.

Floods last August ruined part of the main yearly harvest, creating a 25-percent shortfall in the food supply and putting 6 million people in need, according to the U.N. World Food Program.

Yesterday, the Hong Kong government tried to put a stop to panic-buying of rice in the city of 6.9 million as fears mounted over escalating prices and a global rice shortage. Shop shelves were being cleared of rice stocks as Hong Kong people reacted to news that the price of rice imported from Thailand had shot up by almost a third in the past week, according to agency reports.

Global food prices are even hitting home in New York City, according to a report in the Daily News. Food pantries and soup kitchens in the city are desperately low on staples for the area's poor and homeless.

The Food Bank for New York City, which supplies food to 1,000 agencies and 1.3 million people, calls it the worst problem since its founding 25 years ago.

Last year, the Food Bank received 17 million pounds of food through the Emergency Food Assistance Program, less than half of the 35 million pounds it received in 2002. And donations from individuals and corporations are also down about 50 percent, according to the report.

High gas prices, increased food production costs and a move to foreign production of American food are contributing to the problem.

chowchow
04-08-2008, 11:59
India

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/7327858.stm

RP

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/7330168.stm

Quote from article

As part of its efforts to cut wastage and consumption, the government has urged restaurants to offer their customers the option of having just half the rice they normally get.

brawnless
04-08-2008, 17:32
* How much of the total supply of rice in the country is imported?

* From how many sources (countries) are the rice imported?

* Oil prices have gone up. Now, rice prices are also going up. :whistling:

* Jathropa is becoming a common word. :steamed:

~ it would be very difficult to manage people when their stomachs are not full... :supergrin:

chowchow
04-08-2008, 23:30
Here at the local Hongkong Asian Store (Houston) we have Thai imported rice in 25 lb bag for $ 14 plus tax . That was then but I bet it has gone up in price with the crisis back there.

You can count on us,’ says US envoy on RP rice problem
http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/breakingnews/nation/view/20080409-129292/You-can-count-on-us-says-US-envoy-on-RP-rice-problem

By Lira Dalangin-Fernandez
INQUIRER.net
First Posted 12:55:00 04/09/2008


‘You can count on us,’ says US envoy on RP rice problem
News Most Read RSS
Close this MT. SAMAT, Bataan -- The United States will help the Philippines in easing the rice problem through continuous supply of the staple and research, its envoy here said Wednesday.

US Ambassador to the Philippines Kristie Kenney said her country was "ready to make [rice] available as much as the Philippines [will] need."

"We will always make our supplies available for export if the Philippines needs rice supply," Kenney told reporters in a chance interview here at the 66th anniversary of “Araw ng Kagitingan.”

The government recently imported about 50,000 metric tons of rice from the US, which it sold at a subsidized-price of P25 pesos per kilo.

Kenney also said that the US was contributing to rice research to help develop a variety that she said was more nutritious and more disease-free.

"We are very excited to be part of that so yes, you can count on us," she added.

nitrox920
04-09-2008, 11:04
Just for the history.

When the armerican bought the PHilippines from Spain for 2 million dollars under the treaty of paris.

the american saw the potential of the philippine market for their agri industry that they tried to divert the filipino rice consumption habit to wheat. the american even introduced it thru the educational system.

Remember the song ..."Planting rice is never fun" which was later translated into tagalog... it was the american who made that song for their suppose brown brother.. which they FAILED.:tongueout:

I also remember in out textbook making MAYA as our national bird.. and later that we found out that our PHILIPPINE EAGLE which they also name it as the "monkey eating eagle" was even larger than the American BALD Eagle.

isuzu
04-11-2008, 20:13
Because of the destruction of their natural habitat resulting to scarcity of food and water, this is what happened:

http://www.visayandailystar.com/2008/April/11/topstory5.htm

If we will have problems with food shortages, I don't see why this can't possibly happen to us.

chowchow
04-11-2008, 21:55
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/24065922

http://msnbcmedia2.msn.com/j/afp/dv_to_getty_1834878_0.hmedium.jpg

gen1
04-12-2008, 06:42
Because of the destruction of their natural habitat resulting to scarcity of food and water, this is what happened:

http://www.visayandailystar.com/2008/April/11/topstory5.htm

If we will have problems with food shortages, I don't see why this can't possibly happen to us.

I can't see why the visayan daily star would put a slant like that on the story. It's not like the planet of the apes ***** is happening.

Monkeys are quite plentiful in parts of the mountain range dividing negros occidental and oriental and it is because the locals protect them.

they have a tendency to steal foodstuff but the locals don't really mind all that much because they like the monkeys. :supergrin:

edtf
04-12-2008, 18:03
have you guys noticed that the ones distributing rice are AFP personnel fully armed? I guess this is just a show of power against hijacking and rioting. The sad news is that there are some countries that are in the riot stages na due to food scarcity. This is getting to be a BIG concern. Hopefully we wont reach the point of rioting for food :(. BUT guys better be ready - better have some food and lots of ammo stored as an just in case scenario :wow:

Allegra
04-13-2008, 20:55
We townmates think alike :)
There's no rice shortage
Someones making money and nagpapa pogi/nagpapaganda while doing it
Galing talaga

From - www.inquirer.net

No Free Lunch
Is there a rice shortage?


By Cielito Habito
Philippine Daily Inquirer
First Posted 22:59:00 04/13/2008


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Close this MANILA, Philippines--If we are seeing long lines of people queuing up to buy subsidized government rice these days, doesn't this mean there is a shortage of rice in the market?

The standard answer from government has been: No, there is no shortage because there are ample supplies of rice in the country. What we have, we are told, is a problem of rising rice prices, not of insufficient supplies. As if to prove the point, the President is constantly shown on TV making the rounds of well-stocked rice warehouses of the National Food Authority (NFA) and those belonging to private traders.

But doesn't the law of supply and demand tell us that rapidly rising prices precisely result from reduced supplies and/or increased demands? And that rationing queues are indicative of insufficient supplies, a.k.a. excess demand, a.k.a. shortage?

Distorted market
Well, normally, yes. My own sense, though, is that the government is probably right in saying there is enough rice around to meet our current needs. The shortage argument above holds where the market functions efficiently, meaning there are no market distortions and there is ample competition, especially among the sellers. But neither can be said of the rice market in the Philippines.

The single biggest distortion is NFA itself. For a long time, it had monopoly over rice importation. Even the recent "opening" of rice imports to certain qualified private parties remains so restricted that the distortion remains.

NFA also tries to influence prices at both farm level and retail, by buying high in the former for farmers' sake (at a designated "support" or minimum price for palay, recently raised to P17 a kilo) and selling low in the latter for consumers' sake (at a highly subsidized price, now at P18.25 a kilo).

Anyone can tell that buying high and selling low is not the normal way to do business, and is a sure-fire formula for making huge losses, which NFA has perennially incurred at taxpayers' expense. And yet its interventions hardly affect market prices, as it never has enough funds to buy more than a tiny 1-2 percent of total rice production anyway. Under such conditions, one wonders if NFA should even be doing it at all.

Immoderate greed?
Meanwhile, it has long been alleged almost to the point of being open knowledge that tons of money are being made by the wrong people with every rice importation done by NFA.

Lately, critics are again pointing to the significant discrepancy between rice import prices announced to be paid by NFA, and published export prices for rice from our usual sources (especially Vietnam and Thailand). If true, this is actually a ZTE-type scam that has been going on under our noses for decades! Even the sacks used to pack the imported rice, we are told, are a source of immoderate profits for favored suppliers and their government sponsors.

Would it be any surprise, then, that we continually fail to achieve rice self-sufficiency, when certain powerful individuals could be making fortunes out of government-controlled imports?

Worse, such windfalls are being made on the backs of poor rice farmers, who have consistently been at the losing end of the highly distorted rice market. In particular, when the imports come in at the wrong time, i.e., at or around harvest season--which in our experience has too often been the case--farmgate prices are depressed by the abundant supplies even lower than what they would be.

It's the farmers who suffer from all this, of course, while certain people end up laughing all the way to the bank.

Undue margins
Apart from NFA's role, the other market distortion, long perceived but supposedly never proven, is the undue control over the commercial rice market by suspected rice cartels. It's also a well-known fact that rice traders corner palay supplies from farmers by loaning them money in lieu of formal credit which is largely inaccessible to small farmers.

At harvest, the latter end up with no choice but accept the usually lower price offered by the trader-lender. Without adequate competition in rice trading, the margin between prices paid by consumers for milled rice and prices received by farmers for their palay would be wider than necessary. We have a long-accepted "rule-of-thumb" of a 2-to-1 ratio (actually a little more) between these two prices.

Curious, I checked data from the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and found that this ratio has only been around 1.6-1.8 to 1 in Thailand and India through the years. But Indonesia, which also has an NFA-like agency (Bulog), has the same 2-to-1 ratio as ours.

Self-sufficient
So is there in fact a rice shortage? If you believe government data showing rice production growth of 10.1 percent in the fourth quarter and 6 percent for the full-year 2007, then we ought to be swimming in surplus. A retired government statistician sent me calculations based on the government's rice Supply and Use Accounts (SUA), showing that we are in fact self-sufficient in rice even now.

Why, then, are we frantically looking for rice to import? Is it because certain people have millions of reasons for doing so? Is the President being misled into believing that huge rice importations are critical to her political survival? Or worse, is she in on the profitable secret?

Comments are welcome at chabito@ateneo.edu

riddler
04-13-2008, 21:27
Here at the local Hongkong Asian Store (Houston) we have Thai imported rice in 25 lb bag for $ 14 plus tax . That was then but I bet it has gone up in price with the crisis back there.

If you have a Sam's Club membership, they have a 25lb sack of rice for $10.00. It is better than Jasmine and does not spoil easily even with our high humidity.

antediluvianist
04-13-2008, 23:05
The IRRI says it will take only ONE bad harvest in ONE rice-exporting country to bring inventory stocks locally to near zero.

Let them eat ensaymada.

isuzu
04-13-2008, 23:26
If you have a Sam's Club membership, they have a 25lb sack of rice for $10.00. It is better than Jasmine and does not spoil easily even with our high humidity.

Wow! Rice there is cheap! Even in Chowchow's place it's still at a decent price. A 25 lb bag of rice here in Canada sells for $18.95; $15.95 if it goes on sale.

BTW, check the riots in Haiti due to rising food costs.

CatsMeow
04-13-2008, 23:54
Wow! Rice there is cheap! Even in Chowchow's place it's still at a decent price. A 25 lb bag of rice here in Canada sells for $18.95; $15.95 if it goes on sale.

BTW, check the riots in Haiti due to rising food costs.

Yeah, one UN policeman assigned there, a Nigerian, got shot execution style while he was bringing food to his unit.

I sure would like to have brown mountain rice, but it's seasonal.

edtf
04-14-2008, 00:56
Yeah, one UN policeman assigned there, a Nigerian, got shot execution style while he was bringing food to his unit.

I sure would like to have brown mountain rice, but it's seasonal.

Egypt is almost there too :(

We bought mountain rice when we were in baguio (3 mos ago) - SARAP!! Bought a sack. I think I should have listened to my wife and got 2 sacks. It tastes good, lasts longer and more nutritious than white rice.

Allegra
04-14-2008, 01:56
Egypt is almost there too :(

We bought mountain rice when we were in baguio (3 mos ago) - SARAP!! Bought a sack. I think I should have listened to my wife and got 2 sacks. It tastes good, lasts longer and more nutritious than white rice.

Camote is even better! hehe

edtf
04-14-2008, 02:05
Camote is even better! hehe

masarap din nga yung kamoteng baging. Mabigat pa sa tiyan

Allegra
04-14-2008, 05:18
masarap din nga yung kamoteng baging. Mabigat pa sa tiyan

Plus unlike rice, nobody can eat 3 cups of camote! hehe

CatsMeow
04-14-2008, 19:58
I happen to love camote, either as is or especially with bagoong alamang ("uyap" in our place, I don't like "guinamos"). So in the provinces it isn't so bad, as long as there is camote, or cassava (love cassava cake too!), you won't starve.

antediluvianist
04-14-2008, 20:05
Camote?

I will go no lower than ensaymada.

"Let them eat cake ."

CatsMeow
04-14-2008, 20:45
Camote?

I will go no lower than ensaymada.

"Let them eat cake ."

Ensaymada with mongo inside...mmmm.

bmag
04-14-2008, 21:06
Folks in northern Cebu won't starve with their cassava cake: 'poto' and guinamos. Hope they still grow breadfruit.

Allegra
04-15-2008, 03:17
I happen to love camote, either as is or especially with bagoong alamang ("uyap" in our place, I don't like "guinamos"). So in the provinces it isn't so bad, as long as there is camote, or cassava (love cassava cake too!), you won't starve.


i'm not kidding about camote :)
I hate it but it's really good for you
It's the vihtavuoru of carbs , clean burning , lakas mag bigay ng power factor

Rice makes you eat more and just makes yuo fat
W/c is why yu see a lot of chunky people sa squatters area

atmarcella
04-15-2008, 09:38
I will go no lower than ensaymada.


especially the ones they sell at diamond hotel.

chowchow
04-15-2008, 09:51
Dapat talaga mag backyard gardening . Its good for the health , provides for emergency or supplemental food supply. Also helps save cost for food allowance.

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2008-04/15/xinsrc_52204051521179841781436.jpg

isuzu
04-22-2008, 20:34
Rice here has gone up from $18.98 to $21.98 per 18.1 kg bag over the weekend.

chowchow
04-23-2008, 17:47
Sams CLub has now limit purchases to 4 bags per visit. SIgns of the times.
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080423/ap_on_bi_ge/wal_mart_rice


http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/7363970.stm

bulm540
04-23-2008, 18:13
looks like it has gone global.

isuzu
04-23-2008, 19:28
Chowchow,

I just watched it on CBS Evening News. Sams Club, Wal-Mart and similar stores are limiting how many bags a family could purchase in a visit.

I was at Superstore last night and even if the price of rice increased, there were just a few bags left. I might have to buy at least two bags tomorrow before they decide to ration the commodity.

There is talk here in Canada that rice and other basic staples would be rationed.

CatsMeow
04-24-2008, 01:22
Let's eat...... Nestle Crunch!:supergrin:

Despite all the hulabaloo about rice, it's still available here... and I still keep seeing people leaving uneaten rice on their plates...:steamed:

Duckman1975
04-28-2008, 00:00
Let's eat...... Nestle Crunch!:supergrin:

Despite all the hulabaloo about rice, it's still available here... and I still keep seeing people leaving uneaten rice on their plates...:steamed:

I know what you mean, I hate seeing rice go to waste. My lolo and lola used to make at eat every grain of rice in our plate, "God will punish us daw pag sinayang and biyayang bigay Niya."

blueeagle
04-29-2008, 16:25
I know what you mean, I hate seeing rice go to waste. My lolo and lola used to make at eat every grain of rice in our plate, "God will punish us daw pag sinayang and biyayang bigay Niya."

....brought back fond memories of my grandparents.:cool:

CatsMeow
04-29-2008, 19:19
I know what you mean, I hate seeing rice go to waste. My lolo and lola used to make at eat every grain of rice in our plate, "God will punish us daw pag sinayang and biyayang bigay Niya."

Hehe my lola also said something to this effect as well. Good old-fashioned values.:cool:

gen1
04-30-2008, 17:18
:steamed:

http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/inquirerheadlines/nation/view/20080501-133785/OPEC-style-rice-cartel-up

OPEC-style rice cartel up

5 nations led by Thailand agree to fix prices

Philippine Daily Inquirer
First Posted 01:24:00 05/01/2008

BANGKOK—The countries of Burma (Myanmar), Cambodia, Laos, Thailand and Vietnam have agreed in principle to form a rice price-fixing cartel similar to the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) as costs of the staple grain rocket, Thailand’s prime minister said on Wednesday.

Thailand’s Premier Samak Sundaravej said the grouping of Mekong nations would be called the Organization of Rice Exporting Countries (OREC).

“I have talked with Burma and invited them to join the rice exporting countries cartel, which will include Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia, to fix the price,” Samak told reporters.

He said Burma’s Prime Minister Gen. Thein Sein, in Thailand for an official visit, had agreed to join, even though the military-ruled nation was not currently a large rice exporter.

“Thailand will help them in terms of technical support to improve their production for export,” Samak said.

Samak said Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia had also agreed to join, and Thai Foreign Minister Noppadon Pattama said OREC should begin meeting soon.

Thailand is the world’s largest rice exporter. It shipped an estimated 9.5 million tons of rice overseas last year.

World rice prices have soared this year, a trend blamed on higher energy and fertilizer costs, greater global demand, droughts, the loss of rice farmland to biofuel plantations, and price speculation.

International demand for Thai rice has soared after other top exporters Vietnam and India imposed limits on exports to ensure domestic supply.

Thailand has repeatedly insisted it will not limit exports, but on Tuesday the government announced it was releasing its stockpile of 2.1 million tons into the domestic market to keep prices stable.

Crisis is opportunity for farmers

The benchmark Thai variety, Pathumthani fragrant rice, was priced last Wednesday at $998 per ton for export, up from $512 a ton in January this year, the Thai Rice Exporters Association said in a price survey.

Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen on Wednesday appealed to the country’s farmers to start growing rice and other crops, saying most of the population would benefit from the global food crisis.

“The food crisis in the world, instead, offers an opportunity for Cambodian farmers although citizens complain about the soaring price of rice,” Hun Sen said during a ceremony some 50 km north of Phnom Penh.

“But in return, some 80 percent (of the population) who are farmers benefit from this. Now the opportunity for our Cambodian farmers has arrived,” he said.

Hun Sen said rain had fallen over most of the country and appealed to farmers to rush to grow a variety of food crops, including rice.

“Now the rainy season has started,” he said. “Now the world has a big crisis, so please, our farmers start growing the crops, including rice, corn and beans. All the crops have a market now,” the premier said.

Hun Sen banned rice exports in late March in a bid to halt soaring prices for the staple food.

But on Wednesday, Hun Sen said that the government was considering exporting rice to find markets for Cambodian farmers and to “fulfill our international obligation in helping other countries ... to reduce the difficulty in the world.”

“Cambodia is a small country, but it can help hundreds of thousands of families if we can export the rice,” Hun Sen said.

“We cannot survive alone,” he said, urging governments to find ways to ensure “the world has food security.”

Officials have said that Cambodia has enough rice with more than 2 million tons stockpiled.

Drop export restrictions

UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon on Tuesday urged countries to drop export restrictions and said the immediate priority must be to “feed the hungry” as he ordered a task force to tackle the global crisis.

Soaring rice prices have forced the UN World Food Program to indefinitely suspend a program supplying free breakfasts to 450,000 poor Cambodian schoolchildren.

Better quality rice now sells for more than $700 per ton in Cambodia compared with $300-$400 last year, according to sellers.

Cambodia, where more than 30 percent of the population of 14 million lives in poverty, is one of 12 “hunger hot spot” countries, according to the 2006 Global Hunger Index of the International Food Policy Research Institute.

mikey177
04-30-2008, 20:23
Here's an interesting perspective on the "crisis" from an Inquirer columnist:

http://business.inquirer.net/money/columns/view/20080430-133540/What-rice-crisis-Part-2

Questions of Policies : What rice crisis? (Part 2)

By Honesto General
PDI
Posted date: April 30, 2008

Under its basic policy of buying rice high and selling it low, the National Food Authority (NFA) is mandated by law to lose money—taxpayers’ money. That is what a subsidy is all about.

But the NFA loses far, far more of taxpayers’ money than it should.

Here’s how those tens of billions of pesos in losses and debts are racked up. A well-connected trader brings a truckload of domestic rice at the front gate of an NFA facility. The NFA buys a truckload at the high price. Then, the same truckload is sold to the same trader at the rear gate at the low price.

The same truckload shows up at the front gate again. And again, the NFA buys the truckload at the high price. Then again, the same trader buys the truckload at the rear gate at the low price. This ring-around-the-rosy can go on forever.

Each transaction is properly documented and impossible to post-audit, especially if the resident auditor is in on the scam.

In fact, no truckload of rice is needed for the scam. Purchase orders, invoices, bank checks and receipts can be filled out, signed, countersigned and okayed without a single grain of rice ever going through the front gate.

Importing rice is another huge scam. Watching rice grow is no fun, but there are fortunes to be made by well-connected characters when the government imports rice.

It is true that the NFA, being a government agency and the sole importer, saves the Filipino consumer a lot of money because the imported rice is sold at cost. On the other hand, a private importer would have to make a profit on his landed cost.

But the NFA has to go through a trader in the foreign country. Even in the United States, the NFA cannot buy rice directly from the grower. The NFA has to go through a trader. It is this trader that can pay hefty commissions to the well-connected Filipino character lurking in the shadows.

This means that the rice imported by the NFA is not necessarily cheap. In fact, it may be more expensive than the rice that a private importer may bring in.

Oh, sure, the NFA can go through a public bidding. But, a public bidding, here and abroad, can be rigged.

Then, there is the technical smuggling. An order for 10-percent broken rice is paid for, but what is actually delivered is the cheaper 25-percent broken rice. Anyway, who knows the difference?

Is it not possible that the real reason for the importation is not so much to fill up the supposed shortfall in production but to earn those huge commissions?

The root of the problem is this: Whenever the government heavily intervenes in the buying and selling of products and services in an open and free market, prices will go up, mainly because the government is very inefficient. And that inefficiency is paid for with taxpayers’ money.

So, what do we consumers have to do? I will repeat what I said last week. If your budget can take it, buy only the commercial rice. Buy as much as you need. Do not scrimp. Large institutional buyers such as restaurants, hotels, company canteens, even government agencies like the SSS should buy commercial rice with abandon.

The demand will force the retailers to order replacement stock from wholesalers, who will, in turn, encourage farmers to plant more rice. In the end, prices will settle down to more reasonable levels.

In other words, let us leave the cheap NFA rice only to those who cannot afford commercial rice.

There are forces in a free market that even the government should not and cannot control.

atmarcella
04-30-2008, 21:03
Importing rice is another huge scam

someone i know used to pay customs officials not money but cars just so that the ship carrying rice they bought in vietnam can dock and offload in a port somewhere i cannot divulge.