The age you join the military is the age you stay [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Biscuitsjam
05-06-2008, 10:52
Some of my buddies have a theory - time in the military does not count towards maturity. So, if you join at age 18 and stay in for 20 years, you're still 18 mentally. Active-duty time does NOT count towards making you older/more mature. (in the Guard/Reserve, you age about half-speed).

Also, you'll still wear the same clothes you had from the day you joined. That's why you'll see all the older guys wearing their short shorts and tight t-shirts from the '80s or those ridiculous punk and ghetto-thug outfits.

the iceman
05-08-2008, 01:14
I don't agree with that.

I went in 1998 a dumb kid with no real goals or future. I came out in 2004 a bright young man with with world world in my hands and the rest of my life ahead of me!

Biscuitsjam
05-08-2008, 09:49
I don't know that I agree with it either, exactly...

However, you have to admit that there are a lot of crazy 30-year-olds that do wild stuff that only 18-year-olds would do normally. It isn't so much that they are stupid and immature (usually) as that they just don't act old the way non-military folks would.

Guitar Guy
05-08-2008, 12:32
I really have to disagree with that theory.

I joined in 1968 two weeks after my 17th birthday. A high school grad with no clue on what I wanted to do.
At age 21 with 2 tours in Viet Nam I can say that I was more mature than my peers at home.
Retiring in 1992 after 24 years of active duty I can say I am as mature as alot of people older than me BUT I still know how to have fun. Some may say I am too old for certain activities etc but it's not trying to be younger or immature it's just getting the most out of life of what I have left.
I guess that you could say I appreciate things in life a little more than someone who has not been in the millitary.
Just my 2 cents worth.

tc556guy
05-08-2008, 20:31
I don't agree either. Theres no way an E8 with, say, 20 years in, is still mentally the same as he was as an 18 year olf trainee.

If guys are still wearing fashions from 20 years ago, its because they don't follow fashion trends, something you could accuse most non-meterosexual (particularly unmarried ) males of being guilty of.

Rally Vincent
05-08-2008, 20:32
Some of my buddies have a theory - time in the military does not count towards maturity. So, if you join at age 18 and stay in for 20 years, you're still 18 mentally. Active-duty time does NOT count towards making you older/more mature. (in the Guard/Reserve, you age about half-speed).

Also, you'll still wear the same clothes you had from the day you joined. That's why you'll see all the older guys wearing their short shorts and tight t-shirts from the '80s or those ridiculous punk and ghetto-thug outfits.

That sounds pretty retarded. Which is why I don't agree.

Biscuitsjam
05-08-2008, 20:58
That sounds pretty retarded. Which is why I don't agree.Good response!

Rally Vincent
05-08-2008, 21:29
Good response!

I always try to stay a cut above the rest in my responses. :rofl:

Bert.40
05-08-2008, 22:21
One of the biggest mistakes the government made was doing away with the Draft. A lot of young kids matured in the Military. During War or Peace it's a Life Learning period that every young adult should experience.

JimBianchi
05-08-2008, 23:01
That sounds pretty retarded. Which is why I don't agree.



Yep, you hit it on the head.

tc556guy
05-08-2008, 23:44
One of the biggest mistakes the government made was doing away with the Draft. A lot of young kids matured in the Military. During War or Peace it's a Life Learning period that every young adult should experience.
At the same time, I'd rather not have a military filled with people who don't want to be there, and the .mil really doesn't have the resources to 'fix" broken people who used to be given the alternative of going into the.mil or going to jail. I believe that in the last few years the standards have already been lowered enough already.....some of the guys they've been enlisted have sooo many personal issues, no work ethic, no impulse control. It is a real ass- ache dealing with these problem people.

Biscuitsjam
05-09-2008, 09:20
At the same time, I'd rather not have a military filled with people who don't want to be there, and the .mil really doesn't have the resources to 'fix" broken people who used to be given the alternative of going into the.mil or going to jail. I believe that in the last few years the standards have already been lowered enough already.....some of the guys they've been enlisted have sooo many personal issues, no work ethic, no impulse control. It is a real ass- ache dealing with these problem people.The Georgia Guard is now significantly OVER-strength, which means that all the worthless dumbasses are getting kicked out. Weight and PT standards are being enforced. Lazy, stupid, unmotivated soldiers are getting bars to reenlistment.

Because of deployments, the idiots have been exposed as idiots and relieved of command positions, while the capable soldiers have shot up through the ranks. The guys who don't want to be here are gone, either because they faked medical conditions before the last deployment or because they didn't reenlist when we got back.

In short, the quality of the soldiers in our state is MUCH higher than it was just four years ago. The big downside to being so over-strength, however, is that there are almost no promotion slots right now.

Bert.40
05-09-2008, 13:02
At the same time, I'd rather not have a military filled with people who don't want to be there, and the .mil really doesn't have the resources to 'fix" broken people who used to be given the alternative of going into the.mil or going to jail. I believe that in the last few years the standards have already been lowered enough already.....some of the guys they've been enlisted have sooo many personal issues, no work ethic, no impulse control. It is a real ass- ache dealing with these problem people.

And that's better then a "Draft". When you knew you were going to be drafted or a gamble that you would't be...( this was before the lottery system.. People enlisted with a chance of picking a trade that interested them. Even though you were a "grunt" first; a possible majority walked a straight line, picked up some useful training, matured and prepared them for civilian life.

I'm a Vietnam Veteran and owe a lot to my life in the military. I hated it while I was in; but years later I was able to appreciate what I accomplished.

Then there were friends of mine that were lucky enough to beat the Draft or the ones who became "professional students" and retained a deferment. How did they turn out? Some did well; others with 3 degrees ( Geography, Philosophy, or basket-weaving) are still hanging out on the corner, same as they did in high school.

Life's a crap shoot; roll the dice; go with the hand that's dealt you. Is that enough cliche's

tc556guy
05-10-2008, 03:13
The Georgia Guard is now significantly OVER-strength, which means that all the worthless dumbasses are getting kicked out. Weight and PT standards are being enforced. Lazy, stupid, unmotivated soldiers are getting bars to reenlistment.


And states like mine ( NYS ) are hurting for retention and enlistments. So a lot of stuff slides by, and as far as I am concerned, people are let in the door who shouldn't be here.

leadcounsel
05-10-2008, 03:49
I feel just the opposite. Responsibility and maturity go hand-in-hand. The military makes people generally grow up and learn responsibility MUCH faster than non-military peers - think about it. Who is more responsible; a 20 year old Specialist responsible for his fireteam in Iraq or a 20 year old that sleeps 10+ hours a day, plays video games much of the day, has a part time job, still lives at home, and takes a few college classes that mom and dad pay for?

Bert.40
05-10-2008, 15:04
I feel just the opposite. Responsibility and maturity go hand-in-hand. The military makes people generally grow up and learn responsibility MUCH faster than non-military peers - think about it. Who is more responsible; a 20 year old Specialist responsible for his fireteam in Iraq or a 20 year old that sleeps 10+ hours a day, plays video games much of the day, has a part time job, still lives at home, and takes a few college classes that mom and dad pay for?

You got that right!!!!

Guitar Guy
05-10-2008, 19:29
I feel just the opposite. Responsibility and maturity go hand-in-hand. The military makes people generally grow up and learn responsibility MUCH faster than non-military peers - think about it. Who is more responsible; a 20 year old Specialist responsible for his fireteam in Iraq or a 20 year old that sleeps 10+ hours a day, plays video games much of the day, has a part time job, still lives at home, and takes a few college classes that mom and dad pay for?

I feel the same way.

tc556guy
05-11-2008, 20:08
At the same time, I have known a LOT of irresponsible E1-E4 types in my career. A lot of our seemingly insane policies are based on the inability of Joes, particularly lower enlisted Joes, to do the right thing ALL of the time, even when they know its the right thing to do ..........

Klebanoff
06-02-2008, 22:02
In point of fact, I DO agree with the fellow who initiated this thread! (And, by the way, "its retarded" is, well, a pretty retarded response, because one could easily say that about quite literally ANYTHING with which they disagree).

For my part, I joined the army in 1984, a silly naive kid. When I got out in 88 I was no smarter. Since then I've gotten four college degrees, taught college for five years, and am now a lawyer; and, guess what, I'm still just as dumb as ever! Just like the proverbial box of hammers!

Come to think of it, I suppose that means you can all ignore this post. Oh well...

Blitzer
06-02-2008, 23:17
Putting my signature on that line for the responsibly of millions of dollars of high tech equipment was a real eye opener!

:wow: :shocked: :cool: :supergrin:

V12
06-02-2008, 23:29
I signed about a month after I turned 18 and I matured a ton in the following 3 years

Rally Vincent
06-02-2008, 23:32
(And, by the way, "its retarded" is, well, a pretty retarded response, because one could easily say that about quite literally ANYTHING with which they disagree).

I'm sorry. I just try not to overcomplicate a response which requires minimal brain power to spew out.

It sounded (to me) like an indirect insult. So I responded accordingly.

Meat-Hook
06-03-2008, 16:22
Some of my buddies have a theory- time in the military does not count towards maturity. So, if you join at age 18 and stay in for 20 years, you're still 18 mentally. Active-duty time does NOT count towards making you older/more mature. (in the Guard/Reserve, you age about half-speed).

Also, you'll still wear the same clothes you had from the day you joined. That's why you'll see all the older guys wearing their short shorts and tight t-shirts from the '80s or those ridiculous punk and ghetto-thug outfits.
********************

Well, then I guess we should go with what your buddies have decided.

After all, they ARE of the age and an authority on "maturity".

Bert.40
06-03-2008, 17:41
Where have all the flowers gone...long time passing

:therapy:

fourdeuce2
06-05-2008, 09:53
""YEAH, THE WELL-KNOWN FACT THAT SOMETHING(universe) DOESN'T COME FROM NOTHING(nothingness)."

That's not a fact, idiot. That's an opinion. We'll just add that to the LONG list of things you don't understand. :/"

Personally, I think it's more mature to decide what YOU want to wear than to just go along with everybody else and wear whatever is "trendy".:upeyes:

Biscuitsjam
06-09-2008, 19:20
Wow, I'm surprised this thread is still going. I hope nobody took this thread the wrong way.

To add a little info, the guys joking about this are mostly older. They went active-duty for a few years right after high school. After a lengthy break-in-service, they joined the national guard. They talk a lot about the active-duty army running big parts of their lives when they were in (what time to get up, which clothes to wear, which bars are on/off-limits, etc. etc. plus no bills, no budgeting, etc. If somebody didn't bathe or brush teeth, others would force them. If they bounced a check or took out a bad loan, their chain of command would punish them. If they got a sunburn, they'd get an article 15...). The point wasn't that they didn't grow up at all, but rather they only did so in certain areas.



Also, some of us that spent a fair bit of time on active-duty in the Guard still party and do wild things a fair bit. Apparently, we don't "act our age" or something...


I don't agree with the sentiment, but I thought it was kind of funny. Sorry if some of y'all took it the wrong way.

tc556guy
06-13-2008, 04:33
I think its natural for guys such as you describe to be reflecting back on their AD time. For many people, their military AD time or College time right after high school is the first time they try to spread their wings and become adults. Both groups look back at their memories fondly with rose colored glasses, no matter how harsh the actual experience was.

epitome
06-13-2008, 04:34
i went in at 18 im 30 this years i only did four years and boo.. im still 18 and will never get older i think

I FLEX
06-16-2008, 01:29
i went in at 18 im 30 this years i only did four years and boo.. im still 18 and will never get older i think

That I can believe.

Bert.40
06-18-2008, 21:30
You grew up in a hurry in Korea and Viet Nam...and you weren't looking through rose colored glasses.

On a lighter note, you're only as young as you feel!

Semper Fi..

:usmc::usaf::psycho:

JFK777
07-02-2008, 12:43
Some of my buddies have a theory - time in the military does not count towards maturity. So, if you join at age 18 and stay in for 20 years, you're still 18 mentally. Active-duty time does NOT count towards making you older/more mature. (in the Guard/Reserve, you age about half-speed).

Also, you'll still wear the same clothes you had from the day you joined. That's why you'll see all the older guys wearing their short shorts and tight t-shirts from the '80s or those ridiculous punk and ghetto-thug outfits.

Whoever is feeding you this info is totally out of touch with reality. Total crock of ****.

tankerfrank
07-23-2008, 19:26
I was 18

NH-GLOCK22
08-07-2008, 20:20
Thinking about the thread about: "the age you join the military is the age you stay, etc",
I would offer that the military experience at a young age is such a powerful one that memories of that experience remain prominent with us for the rest of our lives, although sometimes may be dormant for many years. I served in 1963-1966 (Korea, Vietnam) and it seems to me that the memories of that service are just as clear today, 40+ years later. Thinking about that service & discussing with the few veterans around, I always becomed transformed back that young age. The memory inprint from military service at an early age is permanent. Drives my wife crazy that I can remember details from so long ago but not what we discussed last week!

I wouldn't remember the names of most of the cities I visited on my last vacation, but the names of the locations that I served in 40+ years ago? Yep, remember every one.