Short question for grammar folks, use of "Dr." [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Easterbrook
05-23-2008, 18:35
I was asked to look over a business letter written by one of my superiors. I'm not sure how to explain my question except with an example (this isn't the actual paragraph).


"Sam Smith is the CEO of XYZ. Bob Billinger is the CFO. Greg Giller serves as COO. Mr. Smith and Mr. Billinger will resign from their respective positions at the end of the month. Dr. Giller will be retained and will continue to serve as COO."

Since Giller is a doctor, do I need, in the third sentence, to write "Dr. Greg Giller serves as COO"? He is a doctor, so I can't put "Mr." in the last sentence, but it doesn't look right to me to add the "Dr." title in the third sentence.

Sgt. Rambo
05-24-2008, 06:14
I was asked to look over a business letter written by one of my superiors. I'm not sure how to explain my question except with an example (this isn't the actual paragraph).


"Sam Smith is the CEO of XYZ. Bob Billinger is the CFO. Greg Giller serves as COO. Mr. Smith and Mr. Billinger will resign from their respective positions at the end of the month. Dr. Giller will be retained and will continue to serve as COO."

Since Giller is a doctor, do I need, in the third sentence, to write "Dr. Greg Giller serves as COO"? He is a doctor, so I can't put "Mr." in the last sentence, but it doesn't look right to me to add the "Dr." title in the third sentence.


Medical doctor or Doctorate degree? Just curious you could add "Greg Giller; DDO" or whatever the degree designation is after his name. May stay consistent with the other titles ie CEO, CFO. Make sure they pay you for this...LOL

Easterbrook
05-24-2008, 10:43
I actually don't know what kind of Dr. he is. He is a medical doctor of some sort I assume.

trover
05-25-2008, 22:45
Whatever he wants to be called, since he's a superior, would be my recommendation. If your boss calls him Dr., I'd suggest following suit. In some fields, like education and pharmaceuticals, people demand to be called Dr. As a lawyer, however, I'm a Doctor of Jurisprudence, but if I went around referring to myself, or forcing others to, as Dr., people would poor water over my head. Deservedly so, I might add. :supergrin: Some people are swell-heads and insist on it, others are merely following industry practice and conformity.

USDefender
06-21-2008, 09:13
Whatever he wants to be called, since he's a superior, would be my recommendation. If your boss calls him Dr., I'd suggest following suit. In some fields, like education and pharmaceuticals, people demand to be called Dr. As a lawyer, however, I'm a Doctor of Jurisprudence, but if I went around referring to myself, or forcing others to, as Dr., people would poor water over my head. Deservedly so, I might add. :supergrin: Some people are swell-heads and insist on it, others are merely following industry practice and conformity.


If you got it, you don't need to flaunt it, I always say. But it's nice knowing you can... ;)

Jim Watson
06-21-2008, 10:12
"Dr." is correct. You are not using first names of the other players in the second sentence, so give him his title. Especially if he is an MD or if he has a PhD in a field that relates to the job, but even if not, it is consistent.

ramon
07-18-2008, 06:39
... people would poor water over my head. Deservedly so, I might add. :supergrin: Some people are swell-heads and insist on it, others are merely following industry practice and conformity.


people would POUR water....of course, I suppose poor people might could pour water over your head as well....:whistling:

Sorry about being a spelling Nazi, but as a Lawyer, if representing me, I'd appreciate an advocate who can spell English correctly in any written communications.

Cheers,

Ramon