This is why you don't learn from "Uncle Joe" or "Buddy Billy" on a crotch rocket [Archive] - Glock Talk

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fnfalman
06-28-2008, 22:43
http://break.com/index/first-motorcycle-ride-goes-poorly.html

There's a reason why the basic rider course exists. And there's also a reason why responsible riders would steer beginners away from high power sport bikes.

But hey, all it takes are some responsible throttle controls, right?

popnfresh
06-28-2008, 23:13
A good example of why to wear ATGATT.

fnfalman
06-30-2008, 09:35
A good example of why to wear ATGATT.

A good example of responsible right wrist has nothing to do with lack of skills and inexperience.

I wish that for all of those who say, "I'm responsible and I'm going to take it easy with the gas" would look at this video. It has nothing to do with responsibility or reasonability. It has everything to do with no experience and skills yet trying to learn on a 100+HP motorbike.

ateamer
06-30-2008, 13:49
They're both a couple of dumbasses.

SevenFifty
06-30-2008, 14:41
Wow...he has some great friends!

There's a reason why the basic rider course exists. And there's also a reason why responsible riders would steer beginners away from high power sport bikes.
But hey, all it takes are some responsible throttle controls, right?

It all depends on the person.
I think the MSF course is a good idea, just not for everyone. It seems like the only people who take it are just looking for an easy way out of the driving portion at the DMV. If they actually evaluated you riding on the street on the last day instead of around a parking lot, then it would be useful. I went to it after I had been riding for a few months, thought maybe I would learn something. The 3 other people in the class could barely ride around the parking lot without falling over, but still passed and were given the driving exemption at the DMV...there is no way these guys should be able to ride on the street.

My first bike was a CBR600RR with about 110hp. Only rode 1 other (Gixxer750) before picking it up. Out of the 25 or so people I ride with on a weekly basis only a handful started on less than a 600cc. Only 2 have been down...1 due to carelessness at a stop sign, the other crashed a Duc 1098 due to excessive speed in a corner. (he also races AMA on literbikes)
Would I recommend a 250 to a beginner?...Maybe, it all depends on the person.

Slagged
06-30-2008, 14:59
What year honda is that? The headlight is HUGE!!

SevenFifty
06-30-2008, 17:15
Looks like late 90's

popnfresh
06-30-2008, 18:43
A good example of responsible right wrist has nothing to do with lack of skills and inexperience.

I wish that for all of those who say, "I'm responsible and I'm going to take it easy with the gas" would look at this video. It has nothing to do with responsibility or reasonability. It has everything to do with no experience and skills yet trying to learn on a 100+HP motorbike.


I agree, I guess I should have said "ALSO a good example of why to wear ATGATT"
If the dude would have thrown on a jacket, gloves, and boots he wouldn't be nursing road rash for the next two weeks.

I see way too many riders that think a doo rag, wife beater and engineer boots are proper riding gear.

windplex
06-30-2008, 18:50
They're both a couple of dumbasses.

+1

Wow...he has some great friends!...

+1

Only plus is he had a helmet on.

I like how he had protective garmet on: long sleeve T-Shirt. Friends are idiots for not suggesting more gear at least.

G23.40
07-01-2008, 04:53
How was the Bike?.

windplex
07-01-2008, 09:25
How was the Bike?.

Musta been the newbies since no one cared about it;)

predictable damage; time to make it into a street fighter

Bevo1
07-01-2008, 09:32
He should have started out on a smaller bike

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=23e_1214868196

p/uurbrass
07-01-2008, 12:31
I know those idiots...well not personally. They are Clarksburg Md. firefighters stationed at the Gateway Industrial Park Station. On the bright side if the guy would have broke himself up treatment was only a few feet away, a Medic unit is housed at that station. The more "experienced" riders could run wheelies from one end of that park to the other on two or four wheelers, at rather stupid speeds. Guess, common sense isn't needed to pass the civil service test.

Goldendog Redux
07-01-2008, 15:00
I agree, I guess I should have said "ALSO a good example of why to wear ATGATT"
If the dude would have thrown on a jacket, gloves, and boots he wouldn't be nursing road rash for the next two weeks.

I see way too many riders that think a doo rag, wife beater and engineer boots are proper riding gear.

I have to say engineer boots saved my ankle from grindage. I was wearing more than just boots though. Most guys I see are in skate shoes.

MF

windplex
07-01-2008, 18:49
...I see way too many riders that think a doo rag, wife beater and engineer boots are proper riding gear.

around here insert sandals for boots and add someone's daughter to the passenger's seat and you have the cruise mode on sport bikes.

bandana optional.

HollowHead
07-02-2008, 00:01
Actually, that was pretty good instruction based on the MSF courses I've had the displeasure of attending. HH

filthy infidel
07-02-2008, 05:35
I remember where a guy parked the bike and himself in a hollow brick support in front of a shopping center many years ago. Word is that he was sitting on the bike and twisting the throttle to impress some girls walking nearby. He accidentally kicked it into gear and left a deep set of gouges in the asphalt from the kickstand about twenty feet. The bike was still implanted in about a four by four hollow brick store front with a metal pole inside.

CBennett
07-02-2008, 10:54
Squids

itsnitro
07-02-2008, 11:12
http://www.break.com/index/cop-stops-hi-speed-biker.html


This is one way to stop a chase....

windplex
07-02-2008, 11:36
I know those idiots...well not personally. They are Clarksburg Md. firefighters stationed at the Gateway Industrial Park Station. On the bright side if the guy would have broke himself up treatment was only a few feet away, a Medic unit is housed at that station. The more "experienced" riders could run wheelies from one end of that park to the other on two or four wheelers, at rather stupid speeds. Guess, common sense isn't needed to pass the civil service test.

you can see the burn out marks in the video likely from his buddies.

stunts in parking lot -- no problem with gear on -- just my opinion.

i would think that firefighters had seen enough to take better care of friend than that.

ElectricZombie
07-03-2008, 03:49
As someone who knows absolutely nothing about motorcycles, (Planning on taking the class in a few months) what exactly did this guy do wrong? Did he simply give it too much throttle or accidentally shift into gear while reving up the engine?

fnfalman
07-03-2008, 08:16
As someone who knows absolutely nothing about motorcycles, (Planning on taking the class in a few months) what exactly did this guy do wrong? Did he simply give it too much throttle or accidentally shift into gear while reving up the engine?

Too much throttle on a 100+HP bike. He was screwed because had he chopped the throttle, the bike would have caught traction, high sided and tossed his ass ten feet in the air and really breaks something important.

The unnatural riding position of a sport bike puts a lot of weight on a rider's wrists and only exacerbated the situation.

Can it be done? Can a beginner learn on a powerful sportbike? Sure it can, but the question is whether or not it's wise to do so?

Can you learn how to shoot with a .44 Mag instead of a .22LR? Sure you can. But is it wise to do so?

Let me put it this way, I have yet to know a professional racer who started out with a powerful sports bike. They all started out with small bikes/dirt bikes. Of course the bulk of them started out as kids and worked their ways up through the teenaged years. But even the ones that started as teenagers instead of kids didn't start out on high horsepower sport bikes.

windplex
07-03-2008, 08:36
As someone who knows absolutely nothing about motorcycles, (Planning on taking the class in a few months) what exactly did this guy do wrong? Did he simply give it too much throttle or accidentally shift into gear while reving up the engine?

1) wrong bike to learn on -- racer with lights to make street legal
2) did not wear protective jacket -- minimum with helmet
3) did not take rider safety course (but many of us learned on the dirt with smaller bikes and became skilled; but rider safety courses are a good way to start)

start with a smaller bike say a 250 street / trail combo suzuki/kawasaki other. of a 250cc street bike - 250 ninja for instance.

do not listen to friends who say -- you will waste your money becasue you will have to sell it after you learn and then buy a 600 or 1,000 (liter bike) or busa whatever. buying the racer for the road first is a false economy which places your life and whelbeing in front of money. and many are completely satisfied with the bike they buy first.

ElectricZombie
07-03-2008, 13:30
Thanks for the explanation guys.

I've had several people recommend getting a 250cc as a first bike. From what I've seen, 250cc bikes seem to hold their value, so I can always sell it later on for close to what I paid for it. I think this is probably the way to go, as I have zero motorcycle experience.

windplex
07-03-2008, 15:21
Thanks for the explanation guys.

I've had several people recommend getting a 250cc as a first bike. From what I've seen, 250cc bikes seem to hold their value, so I can always sell it later on for close to what I paid for it. I think this is probably the way to go, as I have zero motorcycle experience.

insurance is much lower and gas mileage of the road bikes is in the 50mpg range. off road bikes likely a bit less.

always ask your insurance agent before buying a model to see if you can afford the insurance. likely other similar bikes you can afford if not the first one you call about.

the ninja 250cc road bike gets high reviews and even has its own racing series. others are good too. as said on other threads learning off road has some advantages so street trail bikes offer some fun and versitility -- with road tires are in fashion too -- super moto (motard)

Lewsid 13
07-05-2008, 19:32
Thanks for the explanation guys.

I've had several people recommend getting a 250cc as a first bike. From what I've seen, 250cc bikes seem to hold their value, so I can always sell it later on for close to what I paid for it. I think this is probably the way to go, as I have zero motorcycle experience.
Well, here's what happened to this guy. He rolled up to his buddy, and when he stopped, he lost his balance and started to lean to the left. Not having adequate throttle control he twisted the throttle with his right hand while trying to stabalize the bike. Upon hearing the engine wind out, it probably startled him and he just panicked and released the clutch with his left hand, thus launching him forward.

My advice for you is not necessarily to start on a 250. It would be a time consuming ordeal and regardless of resale value, you will lose money buying a 250 to learn on and then selling it. Trust me, you will be bored with a 250 after about a week.

I don't necessarily recommend learning on a high powered crotch rocket either, but you have to consider who is teaching you.

Back when I was in my early 20's, I taught my girlfriend, who weighed 120 pounds, and had never even sat on a motorcycle how to ride. Guess what I taught her on? A Kawasaki ZX-7, which is a 750cc Crotch rocket.

Now, perhaps I was just young and dumb, or maybe I was just blinded by love, because I know this sounds kinda crazy. Looking back, that may be accurate.

However, I didn't just throw her on the bike like these idiots, and just let her figure it out the hard way. I spent a ton of time off the bike just teaching her the fundamentals of throttle control, clutch finesse, braking and the laws of physics as they pertain to steering and leaning.

Then, I put her on the back with me and drove around an empty parking lot, showing her what the various controls felt like when applied.

After awhile we switched, with me on the back, but in full control of the handlebars and controls. This taught her how to shift, and use the back brake, and nothing else, as I had control over everything else.

Next, I rode on the back with her, but she had full control of the motorcycle.

And finally, I let her ride the bike all by herself, (after I felt she had a firm grasp on all the controls and a certain respect for them as well)

To this day, I have a video lying around the house somewhere of her going 120 MPH down some deserted road as I videotaped from the sidelines, (kinda stupid!)

Realize though, I didn't teach her all this stuff in one afternoon, but rather over the course of a few weeks. Any other questions?

Powder
07-05-2008, 21:59
What year honda is that? The headlight is HUGE!!


It was a 2003 CBR954RR. 154hp and 370 lbs. Not a good beginner bike.......the lack of instruction just made it 50x worse.

windplex
07-06-2008, 18:54
One of my kids expressed an interest in getting his motorcycle license. Now I know how my dad felt when I got mine (he had his).

I suggested the ninja 250 and a local skills course. He has no interest in off road so far. Also advised safety equipment no matter the weather.

I also clewed him in on realistic gas mileage so he understands what is likely.

wispaintstyle
07-09-2008, 10:27
Get the guy a scooter.

Have you driven a stick?

no.

that was the beginning of the end.

Glock30SF
07-19-2008, 10:13
John:rofl:

Glockdude1
07-19-2008, 10:46
He should have started out on a smaller bike

:agree:

DriBak
07-27-2008, 13:51
I should sell him my Honda NQ 50