Your boot camp experience. [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Z1232K
07-20-2008, 08:24
What was it like for you during bootcamp?
Did you go in nervous or headstrong?
How long did it take for them to break you down?

Feel free to give as many details as you like, I would really like to hear them.

I just got a call from my brother down in Fort Knox and.....
.....well, it's the first time that I've heard from him since he left 5 or 6 weeks ago. I expected him to be his casual self when I answered the phone, but...
...I didn't even recognize his voice. To, say the least he was VERY upset.
I haven't heard him like that since he was a kid. It was very hard to understand him but all I got out of the less than 2 minute conversation was that,"I miss you guys", "It's really hard", and "I want to see you guys on family day"

I'm still in shock because he is usually really strong and it was really hard to hear him upset like he was.

Rakkasan
07-20-2008, 15:13
I want to Benning in 2001 right after 9-11. Of course you are a little nervous, but is turned out to be alot easier than I expected. I wouldn't say they broke me down per say because I already respected authority and had good values from my parents, so what they were teaching me in values, I already knew. I never felt like I couldn't handle it, it's just one of those things that you have to be patient and learn a much as you can while you are there. If you get your feelings hurt by the Drill Sergeants, then you may run into a problem.

If he's having this tough a time in Basic, how is he going to weather a year or more long tour in the Middle East?

Infantry School was the easiest time I had in the Army.

Z1232K
07-20-2008, 15:32
I seriously doubt problems with authority or respect.

ShelbyGoat
07-20-2008, 15:35
Went through Knox in 2000, later int eh year, so I experienced the hot, humid weather, to the brutal cold out there. I was 17 yrs old, so it was alot to experience for me. It took them two weeks to have me at muscle failure and then build me back up to a Soldier. Everything else fell into place.

BCT graduation was 10x more important to me than HS graduation IMO.

SSG Stricker
19D Cav Scout

Rakkasan
07-20-2008, 15:39
Did he just get out of High School? Has he never been away from home before, maybe that has something to do with it?

Biscuitsjam
07-20-2008, 15:39
I kept my head down and only got singled out by the Drill Sergeants a few times. I didn't particularly enjoy it, but I didn't think it was too bad either. It was really nice to see my folks on family day, and I was very happy when it was over.

I found that the younger guys (18-20) generally had a lot of problems with the mind games, whereas the older soldiers (30+) had a lot of problems with the physical stuff. Guys that hadn't been away from home much also had a lot of homesickness problems.

We had one phone call within 24 hours, then our second phonecall was 6 weeks later. My cousin's going through right now, and they got phone calls all the way through. After about 6 weeks, they got their cellphones back...

Rakkasan
07-20-2008, 15:46
After about 6 weeks, they got their cellphones back...

:rofl: You have to be ****ting me!

Z1232K
07-20-2008, 15:49
He's been out of H.S. a year or two.

Never really been away from home, though.

I think it may be a combination of the mindgames/homesickness.

GJ1981
07-20-2008, 16:33
Cellphones in basic, what's next? I heard rumors about that when I was in but you know what they say about rumors. I got a phone call at week one and at week 12.

What was it like for you during bootcamp?
Did you go in nervous or headstrong?
How long did it take for them to break you down?



I went through OSUT at Ft Benning in 2005 and it wasn't hard, by my standards. I think basic is entirely to easy, even worse now I'm told, for what we were going to be facing. I went into it with enough common sense to avoid being singled out. I never thought I was broken down, I had no problem being told what to do. I will agree with what others said if he's having trouble now he's going have a rough time deployed.

rangerruck
07-21-2008, 02:05
I went through back in the 80's, and it is tough on everyone, some more than others. the first two weeks, i was convinced i had made a huge mistake. Went and talked to the Battallion Chaplain, told him how bad i wanted out... he said all the usual right things, but said, i hadn't done anything wrong yet, that I was doing all the pt, and all the classwork, and was doing good on all the prerequisites, and to him, I appeared to be doing everything that was being asked of me. He told me to give it two more weeks, and if I still wasn't with it, he would get me out, and back then, they had the power to do just that.
Somewhere in the next two weeks, something clicked, something made sense... It came from a D.I. who was ranger tabbed, and in a spare, kinda off duty moment he said something. He said, " they can kill you, but they can't eat you...". sometime later , I got it. I understood it to mean, look they can dog the hell out of you, and you could of course die, I suppose, by accident or whatnot, but they aren't trying to kill you, to ring up a score, or have some personal vendetta against you, or trying to make you insane...
It's not personal, and they don't get something from you later, or take your money, or turn you into a veggie , because they want to. They try to put everyone through hell there, and see who comes out in one piece, with their mind on straight, so you can make it through the hard times later. those who can't hack it in basic, or ait, or jump school, wont be able to make it through other schools like Q course, or ranger school, or SADS, or SEER, BUDS or whatever school they may CHOOSE, and these are not even combat yet. I also realized that i was good , very good, at a few things. That though I was built like a cinder block, I could actually run all day, and run all night, just like the song says, that i was a good shot, once the A2 rifles came on line, firing expert was a breeze, that I could land navigate day or night easy, that I had great night vision; right now , your bro doesn't realize it, but he thinks everyting is crazy, and he sees no rhyme or reason, and that he doesn't know what the hell he is doing. Very soon, things are going to start making sense to him, and that he is not just doing what he is told, and he may find he is actually good at a few things.
Once I realized that, i really became a crazy, mad dog, super soldier type, very loud, very squared away, could totally take their punishment, and keep asking for more. I know more than a couple of times, when they were counting off pushups, and our whole platoon would keep shouting back "zero, zero, zero" they realized that we were no longer scared, crapful in the pants kids, and now they could get down to the business of teaching us how to be fighters, and not be scared as hell, and do the things that would normally scare the hell out of a civilian, and we would just follow the steps instinctively, go through the diff alternatives and plan b's and c's , to keep on with the mission, and not have the time until afterwards , to think, to be pensive, to be doubtful if we could do something, if we would be too scared.
It was definitely something that i resolved, in my own head, it made perfect sense, I became fearless of them, and I new could finish no probs, unless I got hurt or something, or some kinda accident, or got killed somehow. And even these things mentally didn't bother me anymore, I just resolved that they could happen, but that it would be because they weren't trying to do it to me, hince the ' they can kill you , but they can't eat you', statement made perfect sense. I knew at that point, I would be fine, and have no probs finishing basic, AIT, jump school, whatever they threw at me. Either i would make it all the way, or by some strange turn of events, or accidents, i wouldn't, and those wouldn't be under my control anyway.
The amount of self responsibility he is taking on right now, plus the huge peer responsibility for others he has to help, plus the lack of sleep, the totally diff environment, and the homesickness, is just wracking with him right now. i say, once he crosses the 8 week area, if he is going through all his classes, and pt and grades and evaluations okay, then he will come out the other side just fine.

Oh yeah, cell phones? are you kidding me... human contact was virtually forbidden when I was in, first phone call came after basic, 8 weeks.
I am not sure, but I think first off post tour came after we totally finished basic and had only 1 or two weeks left of AIT, and that was for just the weekend.

Biscuitsjam
07-21-2008, 09:31
Rangerruck, good post.

rangerruck
07-21-2008, 09:36
Thanks for that, i was gonan include a couple of personal stories, about how back then, the d.i.'s could get right in your face, how they could curse at you, use any amount of racist names, and as long as they didn't make a fist, they could put their hands on you. How blanket parties were still done, how once in a while, if some dude had a real prob with a d.i., sometime in the future, you could get a chance to resolve this PRIVATELY, and a few other choice things...

Z1232K
07-21-2008, 14:29
I have to say, few people are able to earn my respect so quickly as those who are decent enough to take their time to kindly answer a question that may seem unwarranted or ridiculous to most. There are a few GT users who are quick to belittle, ridicule, or flame any user they may judge not to have the same common knowledge or expertise in a given area as themselves. Biscuitsjam and Rangerruck, thanks to both of you for your humble anwers to the questions that I've posted recently on this forum.

:patriot:

deadday
07-21-2008, 15:27
I went through OSUT at Ft. Knox. We got a phonecall from reception when we first arrived, then 1 call per weekend starting after week 8. I went through a little older than most, but younger than a few, and had already been a LEO, so the mind games didn't bother me at all, I just pushed through it. My experience was a bit different than most, my DSes singled me out from the start and I was basically their go between from the platoon. We still had the PG and Bookman, but they changed quite frequently. I helped the DS with training scheduling, range scheduling, etc. (basically I was their *****) I got much less sleep than the rest and very little free time, but the benefits of actually being pretty friendly (perish the thought) with the DSes far outweighed that. I still keep pretty regular contact with them....



SGT drew
19D

deadday
07-21-2008, 15:28
Thanks for that, i was gonan include a couple of personal stories, about how back then, the d.i.'s could get right in your face, how they could curse at you, use any amount of racist names, and as long as they didn't make a fist, they could put their hands on you. How blanket parties were still done, how once in a while, if some dude had a real prob with a d.i., sometime in the future, you could get a chance to resolve this PRIVATELY, and a few other choice things...

Not much of that changed at Ft Knox....If you really ****ed up or had a serious issue with a DS (or them you) then you and the DS would have a laundry room party at the end of the day....Door closed....All the washers and dryers were turned on...Couple minutes later door opened and both would come out, sometimes one bleeding, sometimes both, sometimes neither...





drew

rangerruck
07-21-2008, 17:26
thank you for that, It is humbly received I can assure you, to me anyone who joins up these days, knowing full well where they are going, are more hardcore than I ever was, no matter that i served and did some cool stuff, overseas and such, under the great Renaldus Magnus, and Bush 41. I was soft and scared when I went in, though I did try and pt up, but that doesn't matter ; however good a shape you are when you go in, they will still dog you out.
My best friend at the time went in with me. He was, far and away, the most inshape dude you would ever meet, he had a 28 inch waist, and could do over 2000 situps in 2 hrs, non stop. Yet he still dropped out before 6 weeks. Why? He was a momma's boy, and an only child, and mentally he could not hack it, nor could he stand that much authority over him.

To Deadday; good to hear from another old school , Texas homie...

luv2brode
07-21-2008, 17:31
boot camp
osut at benning wasn't horrible, jump school was gravy compared except for that whole jumping part, time at campbell was good for the most part, BUT jfk was a different story, and to top it all off aint nuthin compares to the real thing.

rangerruck
07-21-2008, 22:04
".... except for that whole jumping part..." funny.

deadday
07-21-2008, 22:44
thank you for that, It is humbly received I can assure you, to me anyone who joins up these days, knowing full well where they are going, are more hardcore than I ever was, no matter that i served and did some cool stuff, overseas and such, under the great Renaldus Magnus, and Bush 41. I was soft and scared when I went in, though I did try and pt up, but that doesn't matter ; however good a shape you are when you go in, they will still dog you out.
My best friend at the time went in with me. He was, far and away, the most inshape dude you would ever meet, he had a 28 inch waist, and could do over 2000 situps in 2 hrs, non stop. Yet he still dropped out before 6 weeks. Why? He was a momma's boy, and an only child, and mentally he could not hack it, nor could he stand that much authority over him.

To Deadday; good to hear from another old school , Texas homie...


Oh, I'm new school Army, I've only got 4ish years in....But they don't call it the School of Hard Knox for nothing....Of course it's highly dependent on which training unit you go to (I know, I know, EVERYONE says theirs was the toughest, yada yada, last hard core class yada yada...)...If you wind up with one of the Armor units (1/81 or 2/81) you are going to wind up with a lot more of the new school techy heavy Cav training...If you wind up with one of the Cav unit (5/16 6/16...drawing a blank, can't remember the rest) then you get a lot of the old school Drills (we had a freakin Vietnam vet DS back when they were 11D Air Scouts or whatever the hell they called them..back when door-gunner was actually an MOS) and you get the older attitude, the pre-Bradley training, etc. etc...



drew

ranger88
07-24-2008, 11:54
Don't worry too much about your brother. The mission in basic is supposed to tear a person down so that they can be rebuilt the way the Army wants and needs them. I went through Benning in 1985 and was completely scared to death. This was in spite of being an Army brat and stepson to a career 11B with 2 tours in Vietnam under his belt. I ran like crazy and PT'd myself to death before I went in and they still smoked me like a cheap cigar. I used to repeat to myself "I'm invisible, I'm invisible, I'm invisible...." in the hopes that it may work when drill sergeants were singling people out.

The worst was when a very large drill sergeant told me that he was going to stick his boot so far up my a@@ that my breath would smell like Kiwi for weeks - and I believed him.

Your brother will be fine. I'd bet money on it.

hoosier#17
07-25-2008, 12:30
I said once "I gotta get my GUN sir " to a drill Sgt once. If that tells you anything.
















Yeah, I was real strong when I left. LOL:rofl:

deadday
07-26-2008, 08:06
I said once "I gotta get my GUN sir " to a drill Sgt once. If that tells you anything.



Yeah, I was real strong when I left. LOL:rofl:


Our Drills used to say, you're either going to get smart or get strong...Choice is yours....






drew

Sam White
07-26-2008, 09:01
Ours used to say that too. Except our drills said "looks like we're going to have a lot of strong soldiers at the end of this cycle."

dakotasdad
07-26-2008, 13:00
I called a DI by their first name once. What a day.

Glock 21 Dan
07-30-2008, 20:00
Just a quick note on DS's (DI's). I ran into my head DI in Viet Nam at Camp Alpha waiting to go to Australia on R&R. We went to the NCO club togerther and I never bought a drink the whole night. DI's really are human.

Truck7
07-31-2008, 21:41
Back in the yearly 90’s I was a Drill Sergeant for three years at Ft Knox. Basic training is not that hard it is design for soldiers to succeed. There are a lot of regulations that a Drill Sergeant have to follow, like how much sleep a private has gets and how many meals they get to eat. It is a lot harder being in a regular Army unit deployed in a war zone, not all those regulations that exists in a training/garrison environment.

What your brother is going through is homesickness and is normal. The lowest I use to see my Privates morale was right after they got off the phone with a love one.

I told my Privates to tell their love ones that their primary means of communication was the US mail. I would let them use the phone every two weeks unless they ticked me off. The only requirement was you had to take them to the phones within the first 24 hours of picking them up. After that it was all up to the Drill sergeant.

eisman
08-02-2008, 17:33
My Basic experiences are pretty much out of date. Since then things have changed. But, as everybody who's done it knows, the more it change, the more it stays the same.

It sounds like your brother's hit the point they're pushing him toward, and he'll either make the turn, or not. He won't talk about it much in the future.

It took 22 years for me to get assigned to another Basic Training post. It sure was different with a diamond.

CPT_CRUNCH
08-15-2008, 15:23
dont make me pull my "stresscard"!

RONSTAR
08-15-2008, 15:28
I was kinda nervous at first as I am when I start any new thing. But honestly I think it was the easiest part of my enlistment. Nobody was trying to kill me in basic. 19D Hooooooah.

Tx-G30
08-16-2008, 14:27
i went to basic/ait back in '85 at Ft. Benning. It kinda sucked doing both at the same place but you got used to it.

my only problem was that i wasn't much of a runner. however, like most other people, afterwards, basic/ait was one of the best times of my life and i wouldn't have minded going back again.

interestingly, one of the guys in my basic/ait company was also assigned to the same company and platoon i was at for my first unit - D. co 2/36 3rd AD. upon PCS back to the states, we both got sent back to Ft Benning. At the relacement center, the Top there was the same Top we had in Basic. My buddy got assigned to the 1st ITB and i was sent to Kelly Hill. It was kinda neat romping around our Basic Training area again.

xxiv
08-17-2008, 21:07
I called a DI by their first name once. What a day.

Are you retarded?

AH-1
08-23-2008, 16:26
Thanks for that, i was gonan include a couple of personal stories, about how back then, the d.i.'s could get right in your face, how they could curse at you, use any amount of racist names, and as long as they didn't make a fist, they could put their hands on you. How blanket parties were still done, how once in a while, if some dude had a real prob with a d.i., sometime in the future, you could get a chance to resolve this PRIVATELY, and a few other choice things...


RA drill sgt:cool:.

Dean
08-23-2008, 17:39
I joined the Army almost 30 years ago, and shipped to Ft. McClellan, Alabama for the Army's version of a military police academy and boot camp rolled into one. I came right off the football team and four years of high school ROTC, so I was as ready as I could have been. I could do 100 pushups and run five miles in combat boots.

The Drill Sergeants were mean as hell. Huge, hulking, screaming bastards on steroids and methamphetamine.

Our first hour off the bus they made me do pushups and squat thrusts till I puked. I ran off the concrete deck, leaned over a fence and heaved my nice, chunky breakfast all over the grass. I felt a big hand pat me on the back and looked up at the biggest, ugliest, bald headed paratrooper/M.P. drill sergeant of all of them.

"'Doin' fine, Son."

That's what he said.
I wiped my mouth on my sleeve, ran back to the concrete deck and got back into formation and started getting yelled at some more! I was IN The Army.
"Of the troops and for the troops!"

Both fellow soldiers and Drill Sgts later told me when I ran like that, they thought I was runnin' away to get the hell out of there to go AWOL! HA haha!

Z1232K
08-23-2008, 19:08
Just wanted to thank you all and give a quick update.

I went down to Fort Knox last weekend for family day and visited with my brother. He is doing much better now. I was VERY impressed with the amount of discipline he displayed while we were hanging out. What a difference!

All I can say is that I am VERY proud of him.

I also found out last night that he will be getting stationed in Georgia at Fort Stewart.
I believe Fort Stewart is home to the 3rd ID which doesn't make sense because he is currently in ARMOR training.

ranger88
08-24-2008, 14:00
When I was stationed with the 3rd ID in West Germany, the division had armor brigades/battalions within it's overall structure.

deadday
08-24-2008, 14:39
When I was stationed with the 3rd ID in West Germany, the division had armor brigades/battalions within it's overall structure.

Yup, 3ID has a large armored element....








drew

GMAN40
09-01-2008, 06:33
How long did it take for them to break you down? They never did! It was all a head game and the DI's knew it as well. This was back in 1983 before they had "stress cards" :upeyes:

ace3587
09-12-2008, 20:02
They don't have "stress cards" anymore. At least not at Ft. Leonard Wood.

I just wanted to share my story as I just graduated 31 July 08.

Day 1 was hell and it didn't stop until day 70 something. The first DS we were "introduced" to was the 6' 5" beast. As soon as we were in the cattle car he had slammed a recruits head down into his duffel for picking his head up to look out a window. Everyone was petrified, but I was pretty well prepared. Once the doors opened, the countdown started. 20-19-15-14-11-8-4-2...drop. They skipped a lot of numbers, I was trying not to laugh. People were already getting aggravated. We "met" all of the other DS's and after a barrage of push-ups and yelling we were divided into our platoons.

Although there are set rules and regs, our DS's got in trouble more than once for violations from the 1st Sergeant as well as our CO. Our CO was the "Carer." We missed chow more than once to do low crawls in full battle rattle. They were also big on their "Heat Cats," but those were also violated. But in the end, it was all good training, and we got best PT in the entire batallion :supergrin: . Aw, memories, but now I'm at AIT and loving it here!

Thank you all for your service and stay safe!

deadday
09-12-2008, 20:32
They don't have "stress cards" anymore. At least not at Ft. Leonard Wood.

I just wanted to share my story as I just graduated 31 July 08.

Day 1 was hell and it didn't stop until day 70 something. The first DS we were "introduced" to was the 6' 5" beast. As soon as we were in the cattle car he had slammed a recruits head down into his duffel for picking his head up to look out a window. Everyone was petrified, but I was pretty well prepared. Once the doors opened, the countdown started. 20-19-15-14-11-8-4-2...drop. They skipped a lot of numbers, I was trying not to laugh. People were already getting aggravated. We "met" all of the other DS's and after a barrage of push-ups and yelling we were divided into our platoons.

Although there are set rules and regs, our DS's got in trouble more than once for violations from the 1st Sergeant as well as our CO. Our CO was the "Carer." We missed chow more than once to do low crawls in full battle rattle. They were also big on their "Heat Cats," but those were also violated. But in the end, it was all good training, and we got best PT in the entire batallion :supergrin: . Aw, memories, but now I'm at AIT and loving it here!

Thank you all for your service and stay safe!

Stress cards never existed...Holy crap....The things people believe...




drew

Norman
09-12-2008, 21:15
I went to Benning and I don't care what any of you say, my company had the scariest MF'ing DS ever. He wasn't even a DS, I think they just brought him in to scare the holy hell out of us. They liked unleashing him on us. Even the DS's were in awe of this guy.

Dude was bad, man. He wasn't human, I swear. He was a machine that had no stop. He could make you wanna pee yourself just by looking you in the eye. He was in Mog. According to his tab he was a 75th Ranger, but you could have sworn this sonofabi was Delta or something. Sergeant Perry. None of us could accept he was just Ranger. One of our other DS's was a Ranger. That guy had nothing on Perry.

That joker knew how to mess us up real good. Well, besides the PT torture sessions he put us through. One day we did 1,100 4-count flutter kicks before we were allowed back in bed. Think I'm kidding. We screwed the pooch that day. We never did again.

Then he'd stroll through the company area early in the evening before bed while we were shining our boots, with two hot blondes. One under each arm. Many of us hadn't seen a woman in months. This sonofabi was flaunting two of them. We hated him long before we ever liked him, but he got it out of us.

He made men, that's for sure.

josh10002
09-12-2008, 21:45
Sorry, but after reading some of the posts in this thread I couldn't resist ...

Are you guys freaking kidding?? Army boot camp??? That is a walk in the park on a sunny day. You get phone calls when you arrive and once a week????

Next time you talk to your brother, tell him to grow a pair and just be glad he didn't join the Marines.

deadday
09-12-2008, 21:54
Sorry, but after reading some of the posts in this thread I couldn't resist ...

Are you guys freaking kidding?? Army boot camp??? That is a walk in the park on a sunny day. You get phone calls when you arrive and once a week????

Next time you talk to your brother, tell him to grow a pair and just be glad he didn't join the Marines.

Yeah, yeah, the Army is nothing ompared to the Corps...yada yada...Hey, quick question...why does the Army train Marines at Ft Knox, if the training is so deficient?




drew

josh10002
09-13-2008, 17:20
Yeah, yeah, the Army is nothing ompared to the Corps...yada yada...Hey, quick question...why does the Army train Marines at Ft Knox, if the training is so deficient?

drew

All of the services cross-train in some areas, but we're just talking about boot camp here.

After I posted it, I felt bad. Don't want to discourage anyone to serving the country.

However, I did have a good laugh reading those posts....phone calls every week...I still can't get over it. I couldn't make a phone call for 11 weeks!! The next thing you know, Army recruits are going to be complaining about slow download speeds during basic training. Seriously, anyone complaining about Army basic should just suck it up and grow a pair. If my brother called me wimpering like a baby, I'd rip him a new one.

S&WM&PAR15T&G34
09-13-2008, 17:50
Dean,

Sounds like we were at Ft. McClellan at the sametime ( I recall the Commanding General was MG Mary Clark. ) Anyway that was 29+ years ago. Basic + AIT was at one station and it was a breeze. Keep your nose clean. The toughest school I attended in the Army was Ranger School

ranger88
09-14-2008, 19:56
Amen to that, brother! Ranger school was by far the toughest thing that I ever did during my 6 + years in the Army.





Dean,

Sounds like we were at Ft. McClellan at the sametime ( I recall the Commanding General was MG Mary Clark. ) Anyway that was 29+ years ago. Basic + AIT was at one station and it was a breeze. Keep your nose clean. The toughest school I attended in the Army was Ranger School

GJ1981
09-14-2008, 20:10
Sorry, but after reading some of the posts in this thread I couldn't resist ...

Are you guys freaking kidding?? Army boot camp??? That is a walk in the park on a sunny day. You get phone calls when you arrive and once a week????

Next time you talk to your brother, tell him to grow a pair and just be glad he didn't join the Marines.

I wish I had a quarter for all the times I heard this BS.

Revelations
09-15-2008, 10:42
I went through Basic and AIT at Knox (19Kilo) in 1989. July through Dec so I got to experince the hot and the cold. Good times, good times.

At the time I thought it was difficult but looking back upon it I realize it wasnt all that hard. Lots of mind games and lots of push ups.

I remember while standing in company formation a guy looking at his watch. One of the DI screamed at him "What are you looking at your watch for? You got another 4 months til you can go anywhere." Still makes me chuckle a little.



Good times, good times.

jerryd
09-22-2008, 16:38
Ft Dix feb 1966, thats when the DI,s could still hit you and they did! Our DI Sgt Armstrong was a mother, rear end jacked up between his shoulderblades,strutting with his 50 cal. tipped swagger stick. cold and damp! had the old coal furnaces, next to Mcguire AB the B-52s would make a hell of a racket. CELL PHONES????? we couldnt call home till after our 2nd week, carried our m-14s everywhere we went, but you know it was an experiance ill never forget!! 8 glorious weeks there then 24 at Ft Monmouth and then 2 tours in beautiful Vietnam!!! Love It !!!:whistling::whistling:

RONSTAR
09-23-2008, 18:13
Yeah, yeah, the Army is nothing ompared to the Corps...yada yada...Hey, quick question...why does the Army train Marines at Ft Knox, if the training is so deficient?

And why did I get stuck training marines how to shoot at ktc.