Linux gurus! Aspire One will not connect to internet [Archive] - Glock Talk

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The Pontificator
08-19-2008, 03:09
The new Acer Aspire One will not connect to the internet via my wired (Ethernet) connection although I can connect wirelessly (took the machine down the street to a free wifi hotspot and hooked up and downloaded all current software updates from Acer).

I have edited the LAN account from DHCP to customized settings (entering all the IP/DNS account numbers from my ISP). The LAN account as well as the connection icon on the systray both indicate that I have a wired connection but I still cannot connect to the web.

Really odd and obviously unacceptable. The ethernet connection should work right out of the gate. I don't believe my cable modem is at issue. All the other computers I've owned in the past 6 years have automatically hooked up with my modem....I have to believe it's DHCP compliant.

Does anyone have a possible solution before I have to spend four hours on Acer's support line talking to someone from Bangalore? :brickwall:

I did send Acer Support an email request for help.

Dandapani
08-19-2008, 04:26
Will they even talk to you about Linux?

IndyGunFreak
08-19-2008, 04:46
Will they even talk to you about Linux?

Probably, since it was pre-installed on the system.... thats not to say they'll be useful.
What OS did that system come with? If I recall correctly, it came w/ Linpus, which is Fedora based.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linpus_Linux

Pont.. Open a terminal window and type "lspci" no quotes, hit enter and post the output here. Now how exactly you open a terminal window, I don't know. Hopefully you have an icon or some sort of easy menu system where you can open it easily. You obviously do not have a router(at least a wireless one), so what did you do, unplug your "main" pc/laptop from the internet, and plug in the aspire?

IGF

dotsun
08-19-2008, 04:57
And when you do that for indy, also list your ip settings for us. Also are you behind a router? Can you ping the router, can you ping 4.2.2.1? Can you ping google.com?


edit: If you're not behind a router, prob not a good idea to post your ip addy. :)

IndyGunFreak
08-19-2008, 05:13
edit: If you're not behind a router, prob not a good idea to post your ip addy. :)

I'll add, if you're not behind a router, you should be. Not to expensive, and provide invaluable security.. Not to mention, you could have wireless at home.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833124010

Thats a smoking deal right there. I don't know if you're living in the Taj Mahal, but I had that router, and its extremely easy to setup, easy to configure, pretty good signal range, etc.

IGF

The Pontificator
08-19-2008, 16:14
operating system is linpus linux light.

yes,re unplugged ethernet from my desktop and plugged it into aspire one. Acer has replied and said it is a 'known issue'.

I have a router, an Apple Airport Express. Have not installed it yet.

The Pontificator
08-19-2008, 16:17
aside from this one little but, this little netbook is a lot of fun!

The Pontificator
08-19-2008, 20:05
You obviously do not have a router(at least a wireless one), so what did you do, unplug your "main" pc/laptop from the internet, and plug in the aspire?

IGF Yes, the Ethernet cord from the cable modem.

The Pontificator
08-19-2008, 20:06
Upon reading Acer's email reply more closely I see that they are saying that my problem is NOT a known issue. Ah, crap.

Washington,D.C.
08-19-2008, 20:37
Signing on to your ISP with Linux can be complicated. It's easiest to use a router and enter your ISP sign on info in the router. Then use DHCP to connect to the router with ethernet cable.

IndyGunFreak
08-19-2008, 20:41
Signing on to your ISP with Linux can be complicated. It's easiest to use a router and enter your ISP sign on info in the router. Then use DHCP to connect to the router with ethernet cable.

I agree, most of them have software that sets up your connection w/o issue for Windows/Mac. Setup the router on your Mac, then hook your Laptop up through it... shouldn't be a problem from the sounds of it.

IGF

Washington,D.C.
08-19-2008, 20:55
I think most routers can be setup without any software. They include extra software but it's usually not needed to just get on the internet.

IndyGunFreak
08-20-2008, 03:36
I think most routers can be setup without any software. They include extra software but it's usually not needed to just get on the internet.

Oh yeah, but most of the time the software that comes w/ them, makes it kind of a "one click process".. Where if you don't have the software, you have to hook up the router, log in to the router, setup your settings, etc..

Usually with the CD, you put in the CD, it tells you when to hook up the router, then it gets you online, then you can log in to the router and tweak it.

IGF

dotsun
08-20-2008, 11:15
Did you try pinging either of the places I suggested earlier, or did you get it working? At this point I highly suspect you're being MAC filtered by your isp, but I need to know if you're getting packets out.

corpseal
08-20-2008, 11:29
Okay Pontificator, first of all you need to make sure it is your ethernet controller you are dealing with in whatever kind of configuration setup your linux uses. Next, I am not sure why you felt the need to edit the initial setup with customized settings. Usually, in most linux versions, you would simply run with the default- for example: leave the protocol at DHCP; select all items that have "assign.......from DHCP", or "get ......from DHCP", or anything to that effect or similarly worded, such as "get DNS servers from DHCP; make sure you have selected the connection to start at boot, so you will not have to manually start it somewhere in the configuration setup; also, make sure you have "dhclient" selected as your DHCP client. This should get you up and running, hopefully. Good luck.

IndyGunFreak
08-20-2008, 16:59
I googled this issue, and Pont is right, its a known issue w/ the recent system updates, illing the ethernet port. A couple of posts I saw, said that the only fix was to create a system restore disk from the DVD(probably on a thumb drive), and to do a system restore.

Then it would work again. Seems the easier thing to do, would be to just get the router hooked up and use it that way, but thats just my thinkin.

IGF

The Pontificator
08-21-2008, 20:53
Pont.. Open a terminal window and type "lspci" no quotes, hit enter and post the output here.
IGF

"command not found"

The Pontificator
08-21-2008, 20:56
when you folks say "router" are you saying a WIRED router or a WIRELESS router?

IndyGunFreak
08-22-2008, 03:45
"command not found"

command not found? lspci (thats a lowercase L)

IGF

IndyGunFreak
08-22-2008, 03:46
when you folks say "router" are you saying a WIRED router or a WIRELESS router?

Wireless, because apparently, you're ethernet port is not working.. so a wired connection would be useless. Your Airport express shoudl be more than adequate...

Tech specs...
http://www.apple.com/airportexpress/specs.html

Setup instructions...
http://www.apple.com/airportexpress/setup.html

Use your Mac, to setup your wireless router(The Airport) and create a network.. Then once you've done that, plug your network settings in to the Aspire, and you should be able to get on your personal wireless network, just like you did at the Wi-Fi hotspot. Once you're done and you have the Aspire online... Log back in to the router from one of the two, and tweak the security settings so you're not giving access to every bozo in the neighborhood.

The Pontificator
08-22-2008, 04:07
command not found? lspci (thats a lowercase L)

IGF

I thought that was an upper case "i". Will try again.

OK, I'm getting a whole screen full of info supposedly about different ports. What should I be looking for?

Of interest: somethat reads...

02:00.0 Ethernet Controller: Realtek RTL8102E PCI Express Fast Ethernet controller (rev 02)

IndyGunFreak
08-22-2008, 04:45
I thought that was an upper case "i". Will try again.

OK, I'm getting a whole screen full of info supposedly about different ports. What should I be looking for?

Of interest: somethat reads...

02:00.0 Ethernet Controller: Realtek RTL8102E PCI Express Fast Ethernet controller (rev 02)

Well, I tried hitting Google, and everything that popped up, was in a foreign languge..

I'd setup the router, probably won't take 20min and you'll be online via wireless w/ both laptops if you want.

IGF

The Pontificator
08-22-2008, 07:24
I went into connection properties and found some more info...

Driver: r8101

Hardware Address: 00.IE:68:8A:A0:5C

The Pontificator
08-23-2008, 07:40
One thing I haven't tried is powering down the modem and then re-booting it with the ethernet cord plugged into the Aspire One vs. the desktop...

http://www.aspireoneuser.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=17&t=1776

The Pontificator
08-23-2008, 17:38
...and...SUCCESS!

:woohoo:

Which means I'll have to power the modem down again when I re-connect my Desktop.

Ya learn something everyday!!!!!

EDIT: I feel like an idiot for not rebooting my modem first. Kinda reminds me of that recent episode of South Park: "Over-Logging".

"Fire a warning shot!" :rofl:

biblefreak
08-24-2008, 12:11
...and...SUCCESS!

:woohoo:

Which means I'll have to power the modem down again when I re-connect my Desktop.



Or just set up your router!! Then you won't have constant reboots AND your machines will be infinitely more secure sitting behind a router!

IndyGunFreak
08-24-2008, 13:55
Or just set up your router!! Then you won't have constant reboots AND your machines will be infinitely more secure sitting behind a router!

That was my suggestion.. :)

I guess if he's happy connecting/reconnecting and powering off/powering on.. thats all that matters. Although the security feature of a good firewall would also be a huge benefit.

IGF

The Pontificator
08-24-2008, 14:12
That was my suggestion.. :)

I guess if he's happy connecting/reconnecting and powering off/powering on.. thats all that matters. Although the security feature of a good firewall would also be a huge benefit.

IGF

I have no intention of constantly doing that. I just wanted to make sure that my Aspire One would "ethernet" if circumstances required it.

The Pontificator
08-24-2008, 14:54
OK. It's done. I am now have a wireless network!
This post done on the Mini...

The Pontificator
08-24-2008, 14:59
This one on the Aspire One! :supergrin:

IndyGunFreak
08-24-2008, 17:23
I have no intention of constantly doing that. I just wanted to make sure that my Aspire One would "ethernet" if circumstances required it.

Cool, glad you got it working..

If you absolutely have to, you should have a short ethernet cable, you can run from your Router, to your Aspire, and you should be fine.

Glad you got it going.. .Hopefully you followed the security precautions mixed in the various Wireless threads here... Setting up your network w/ WPA and disabling ESSID broadcasting.. will go a long way to keeping your connection secure.

The Pontificator
08-24-2008, 18:29
Cool, glad you got it working..

If you absolutely have to, you should have a short ethernet cable, you can run from your Router, to your Aspire, and you should be fine.

Glad you got it going.. .Hopefully you followed the security precautions mixed in the various Wireless threads here... Setting up your network w/ WPA and disabling ESSID broadcasting.. will go a long way to keeping your connection secure.

Unfortunately, that's the drawback to the Apple Airport Express: it has only one Ethernet connection port...the one that comes in from the modem.

But yes, ESSID is disabled and WPA2 protection is enabled. as soon as I can locat the MAC addresses of the two machines I use I'll probably enable that as well.

dotsun
08-24-2008, 20:06
Unfortunately, that's the drawback to the Apple Airport Express: it has only one Ethernet connection port...the one that comes in from the modem.

But yes, ESSID is disabled and WPA2 protection is enabled. as soon as I can locat the MAC addresses of the two machines I use I'll probably enable that as well.

Honestly I wouldn't bother with MAC filtering. If your wpa encryption doesn't keep me out, MAC filtering certainly won't hold me up over a few seconds if you have a client connected.

johnnypets
08-24-2008, 21:00
I just bought one today on sale at Best Buy, and so far I like it. Mine has Microsoft XP, smooth sailing... I don't think I know what Linux is?

The Pontificator
08-24-2008, 22:41
I just bought one today on sale at Best Buy, and so far I like it. Mine has Microsoft XP, smooth sailing... I don't think I know what Linux is?

I copied and pasted the highlights. In short, "Linux" is an open source operating system. It isn't owned by any one company such as Windows or Apple. There are many different distributions of Linux such as Red Hat, Fedora, Open SUSE, Ubuntu, etc.

The Linux distribution on the lower level Acer Aspire One is Linpus Linux Lite which is a beginner's version of Linpus Linux, developed by Linpus, an Asian company.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linux

Linux (commonly pronounced IPA: /ˈlɪnəks/ in English; variants exist[1]) is the name usually given to any Unix-like computer operating system that uses the Linux kernel. Linux is one of the most prominent examples of free software and open source development: typically all underlying source code can be freely modified, used, and redistributed by anyone.[2]

The name "Linux" comes from the Linux kernel, originally written in 1991 by Linus Torvalds. The system's utilities and libraries usually come from the GNU operating system, announced in 1983 by Richard Stallman. The GNU contribution is the basis for the alternative name GNU/Linux.[3]

Predominantly known for its use in servers, Linux is supported by corporations such as Dell, Hewlett-Packard, IBM, Novell, Oracle Corporation, Red Hat, and Sun Microsystems. It is used as an operating system for a wide variety of computer hardware, including desktop computers; supercomputers;[4] video game systems, such as the PlayStation 2 and PlayStation 3; several arcade games; and embedded devices such as mobile phones, routers, and stage lighting systems.

The primary difference between Linux and many other popular contemporary operating systems is that the Linux kernel and other components are free and open source software. Linux is not the only such operating system, although it is the best-known and most widely used. Some free and open source software licences are based on the principle of copyleft, a kind of reciprocity: any work derived from a copyleft piece of software must also be copyleft itself. The most common free software license, the GNU GPL, is a form of copyleft, and is used for the Linux kernel and many of the components from the GNU project.

As an operating system underdog competing with mainstream operating systems, Linux cannot rely on a monopoly advantage; in order for Linux to be convenient for users, Linux aims for interoperability with other operating systems and established computing standards. Linux systems adhere to POSIX,[15] SUS,[16] ISO and ANSI standards where possible, although to date only one Linux distribution has been POSIX.1 certified, Linux-FT.[17]

A Linux distribution, commonly called a “distro”, is a project that manages a remote collection of Linux-based software, and facilitates installation of a Linux operating system. Distributions are maintained by individuals, loose-knit teams, volunteer organizations, and commercial entities. They include system software and application software in the form of packages, and distribution-specific software for initial system installation and configuration as well as later package upgrades and installs. A distribution is responsible for the default configuration of installed Linux systems, system security, and more generally integration of the different software packages into a coherent whole.

Linux is largely driven by its developer and user communities. Some vendors develop and fund their distributions on a volunteer basis, Debian being a well-known example. Others maintain a community version of their commercial distributions, as Red Hat does with Fedora.

In many cities and regions, local associations known as Linux Users Groups (LUGs) seek to promote Linux and by extension free software. They hold meetings and provide free demonstrations, training, technical support, and operating system installation to new users. There are also many Internet communities that seek to provide support to Linux users and developers. Most distributions and open source projects have IRC chatrooms or newsgroups. Online forums are another means for support, with notable examples being LinuxQuestions.org and the Gentoo forums. Linux distributions host mailing lists; commonly there will be a specific topic such as usage or development for a given list.

IndyGunFreak
08-25-2008, 01:34
Unfortunately, that's the drawback to the Apple Airport Express: it has only one Ethernet connection port...the one that comes in from the modem.

But yes, ESSID is disabled and WPA2 protection is enabled. as soon as I can locat the MAC addresses of the two machines I use I'll probably enable that as well.

Eh, that does kinda suck. I didn't realize the Aiport only had one port... Well, I guess if its ever an issue, you said you had the Linksys.. :)

Mac filtering... Its not a bad thing, but I agree w/ dotsun, if you have WPA2, the firewall is enabled, and you've disabled ESSID... You've done more than 60% of the bozo's out there w/ wireless. Also, make sure the default password is changed for you to log in to the router. Linksys uses clever default usernames/passwords like.. username: username and password: passwd. :upeyes:

Congrats on gettin it going.