Can you eat a Racoon? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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kerbie18
10-03-2008, 16:47
A neighborhood close to mine has a TON of racoons. I've seen ten of them eating out of the same dumpster.

The thought occured to me...are they edible? I mean, if you were starving to death, and you cooked the hell out of it. I really don't see it happening, but I was just curious....

NeverMore1701
10-03-2008, 16:55
From personal experience, yes. Not the tastiest, and cook the hell out of it, but yes.

Short Bus
10-03-2008, 16:55
Hell, you can cut your boots up and eat them if you are hungry enough.

Porkchop
10-03-2008, 17:00
Hell, you can cut your boots up and eat them if you are hungry enough.
:rofl: hope i never get that hungry.
if i remember correctly revolutionary war and civil war soliders that had no food boiled the leather from their boots and ate them

Minuteman
10-03-2008, 17:05
Yes, edible and a good source of fat in the wild if your starving.
Much rather have elk, but obviously anyone looking at a coon as a meal doesn't have a choice.

kerbie18
10-03-2008, 17:05
Hell, you can cut your boots up and eat them if you are hungry enough.

You can eat leather??? Okie dokie, I learned something new today:shocked:

Minuteman
10-03-2008, 17:09
You can eat leather??? Okie dokie, I learned something new today:shocked:

No. Modern leather is poisonous. Naturally tanned/dyed leather, OTOH, is basically really tough jerky.

Short Bus
10-03-2008, 17:11
You can eat leather??? Okie dokie, I learned something new today:shocked:

Yeah, people have done it in years past when they were REALLY hard up. It is just animal skin. Do you eat chicken skin with yo fried chicken? :cool:

Short Bus
10-03-2008, 17:13
No. Modern leather is poisonous. Naturally tanned/dyed leather, OTOH, is basically really tough jerky.

There are many companies that use the same tanning process that they have used for years. I guess it depends on where in China it came from or if it is from the USA.

filthy infidel
10-03-2008, 17:42
Mama just chased 'em off the porch with a broom.

rj1939
10-03-2008, 18:25
They will probably be the only thing left after the other wildlife is gone..........you'll never get them all.:faint:

RWBlue
10-03-2008, 18:44
First don't eat your leather products, odds are that they were not tanned by traditional means.

Second, I believe I ate coon before. If it was coon, it was fixed in a crockpot and was good.

thetoastmaster
10-03-2008, 18:50
No. Modern leather is poisonous. Naturally tanned/dyed leather, OTOH, is basically really tough jerky.

Well, not really. Hide is a dense irregular connective tissue, if I remember correctly. Jerky is muscle. Muscle is a lot easier to digest than collagen, which is all you're getting out of hide.

I understand that one could digest it, given enough time and water, but jerky it ain't ;) :supergrin:.

packratt75
10-03-2008, 18:51
Have "The Official Louisiana Seafood & Wild Game Cookbook" that a relative gave to us. Has small game recipes for Opossum, Nutria, Muskrat, Frog Legs, Turtle, Rabbit, Squirrel and two for Racoon (roasted and fricasseed). Haven't tried any of them but at least have something to go on if need be.

R_W
10-03-2008, 18:58
In a crockpot with cranberry sauce. Possum, too.

The stories from the old-timers here there were many families that only made it through the depression winters because of eating them (and anything else they could catch).

They said it was best to catch them live and put them in a barrel/cage with a little corn and plenty of clean water for a few days to clean them out. Definitely Hillbilly, way beyond redneck like I am used to...

RWBlue
10-03-2008, 18:59
Have "The Official Louisiana Seafood & Wild Game Cookbook" that a relative gave to us. Has small game recipes for Opossum, Nutria, Muskrat, Frog Legs, Turtle, Rabbit, Squirrel and two for Racoon (roasted and fricasseed). Haven't tried any of them but at least have something to go on if need be.

I would like to have the ISBN number or amazon link.

I would also like to hear you test one of them and tell us if it is an ok cook book.

thetoastmaster
10-03-2008, 19:01
In a crockpot with cranberry sauce. Possum, too.

The stories from the old-timers here there were many families that only made it through the depression winters because of eating them (and anything else they could catch).

They said it was best to catch them live and put them in a barrel/cage with a little corn and plenty of clean water for a few days to clean them out. Definitely Hillbilly, way beyond redneck like I am used to...

When I served my LDS mission in South Carolina, I knew an old timer that spent his youth in a CCC camp. He told us about "cleaning out" possums with cornbread before slaughtering them; so, that's one more corroborating story.

Grayson
10-03-2008, 19:36
There are many companies that use the same tanning process that they have used for years. I guess it depends on where in China it came from or if it is from the USA.

Mmmm....melamine..nom nom nom!

NOT! :ack:

bdcochran
10-03-2008, 19:39
What do you get when you cross Eull Gibbons and Linda Lovelace?

.
.
.
.
.
.
drum roll please
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.
.
..
A person who will eat anything.:supergrin::rofl:

packratt75
10-03-2008, 19:48
On Amazon there is only one used one for $35, last printing was 1990. Wife says she has used it for seafood mostly, was going to try nutria when my cousin caught another one but it didn't work out. Would only try nutria if it came from the swamp where they eat vegetation and not from the city canals.

ejsandstrom
10-03-2008, 20:03
A friend from the DEEP south said locals used to hunt them and skin them and then sell them. But that a few were less than honest and used to sell cats. So you had to leave the feet on them to be sure of what you were buying.

mitchshrader
10-03-2008, 20:05
in the interests of safety and taste..

i've eaten a badger. it was good. i'm a good cook.

with heavy(dense) gamey meat, there are helpful tricks..

first gut/ skin, remove small bones (feet/tail/neck) and musk glands, whack up in hunks..

marinade it in salt water several hours, warm is best, rinse well,

repeat, then a warm UNSALTED rinse, and either steam/seethe.. (NOT BOIL!) for 6+ hours, or pressure cook 30+ minutes.

Naturally the bigger the pieces the longer you cook it, and if it's VERY gamey you want to seethe it (in water), to draw out more nasty taste.. whereas if less gamey you can steam it(out of water) and lose less flavor..

In no case waste spices on it until cooked tender, and that is done by 'wet, slow, loooooong' cooking.

AFTER it's 'done' ie cooked soft enough to eat without any teeth.. (let it cool first) you can bread it in an ordinary chicken-style breading with flour, salt, some black&red pepper in it (about 4-1 ratio) and garlic powder if you've got any.. and fry in any available grease, but bacon grease works, lard is good, peanut or corn or olive oil all work.. if you're frying in bacon grease don't salt the breading..

marinade(soak out) wild taste. . cook VERY slow & wet, bread it and lightly saute.. and it's gonna be darn close to food.

certifiedfunds
10-03-2008, 20:41
On Amazon there is only one used one for $35, last printing was 1990. Wife says she has used it for seafood mostly, was going to try nutria when my cousin caught another one but it didn't work out. Would only try nutria if it came from the swamp where they eat vegetation and not from the city canals.

Nutria is good, plentiful and very healthy to eat.

Vegetarians.

And, we're lousy with them.

Short Bus
10-03-2008, 20:51
Have "The Official Louisiana Seafood & Wild Game Cookbook" that a relative gave to us. Has small game recipes for Opossum, Nutria, Muskrat, Frog Legs, Turtle, Rabbit, Squirrel and two for Racoon (roasted and fricasseed). Haven't tried any of them but at least have something to go on if need be.

I have had many things off of this list. I guess you can make about anything taste decent if you prepare it right.

Dresden
10-03-2008, 21:46
If i remember right there are certain glands you need to cut out when cleaning a racoon.

Minuteman
10-04-2008, 03:31
No. Modern leather is poisonous. Naturally tanned/dyed leather, OTOH, is basically really tough jerky.

There are many companies that use the same tanning process that they have used for years. I guess it depends on where in China it came from or if it is from the USA.


:whistling:

Bravo 1
10-04-2008, 06:09
We trapped for years,,until the fur market went to hell in a handbasket.

We skinned,smoked and BBQ'd the coons.

Better than pork of beef actually.Rich and very tasty.

Not very open minded opinions for a bunch of survivalists,,:whistling:

bbsound
10-04-2008, 07:01
MMMMMM reminds me of the days of beaver chili and muskrat in the crocpot!!:supergrin:

kirgi08
10-04-2008, 08:38
We trapped for years,,until the fur market went to hell in a handbasket.

We skinned,smoked and BBQ'd the coons.

Better than pork of beef actually.Rich and very tasty.

Not very open minded opinions for a bunch of survivalists,,:whistling:


Have et it/Chili I think.Not bad/has also had possum/squirrel/wabbit.No Elk/Moose.Wild Pigs are missing though.There are Feral pigs in the south.'08.

Good Point with your last.

rustypigeon
10-04-2008, 09:15
Make sure you always wear gloves when handling raccoons. They carry some nasty parasites. Personally I would reserve the coon meat for when there is no other meat available.

http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dpd/parasites/baylisascaris/factsht_baylisascaris.htm

Jake514
10-04-2008, 12:01
I have tasted/eaten raccoon and find it OK if cooked properly, similar to the posters above. (I am NOT a cook and far from it.) It is a little gamey like most other non-traditional meats, and just different. If you do not want to eat raccoon, at least cook it and feed it to your dogs - they will appreciate it AND THE FOOD DOESN'T GO TO WASTE.

I have also eaten ground hog which was excellent-MUCH BETTER THAN RACCOON. They are vegetarians similar to the nutria. Most farmers are glad to get rid of the ground hogs as they eat their crops (soybeans especially) and damage equipment when a vehicle wheel drops into their hole. Again, figure a way to make good use of the animal meat.

shotgunred
10-04-2008, 12:24
i think i would prefer to stick to slow elk for as long as possible.

Dresden
10-05-2008, 07:39
Certifiedfunds had it right on.

Nutria is one of the best survival foods in this area. They are everywhere and are very good.

A lot of people are turned off by the way they look but they are vegetarians and the meat is very clean.

Cavalry Doc
10-05-2008, 14:06
Racoon? I'd have to be awful hungry. Luckily, there are almost too many feral hogs around here.

rj1939
10-05-2008, 16:17
Racoon? I'd have to be awful hungry. Luckily, there are almost too many feral hogs around here.

We don't have any in the immediate area but a couple of counties over there are some.

Cajunmudman
10-07-2008, 22:11
I live in the swamps in Louisiana where nutria are outnumbering people. The state of Louisiana now has a program that they will give you $4 for every nutria tail you bring in to them. Great target practice with a .22. A popular way to use nutria meat is mix it half and half with pork and make boudin. Cajuns will eat anything that doesnt eat them first.

CableRouter
10-08-2008, 10:17
I can't believe that no one has brought this up yet.
http://www.amazon.com/Original-Road-Kill-Cookbook/dp/0898152003

The Roadkill Cookbook. Just about anything in size from Squirrel to Bear is in there. :)

NickM
10-08-2008, 12:45
Cajuns will eat anything that doesnt eat them first.:rofl:

This is a neat thread. I havn't ever tried anything crazy but If I were hungry enough I would definatly be open to trying it.

RWBlue
10-08-2008, 13:45
I can't believe that no one has brought this up yet.
http://www.amazon.com/Original-Road-Kill-Cookbook/dp/0898152003

The Roadkill Cookbook. Just about anything in size from Squirrel to Bear is in there. :)

Is that a joke book or a real cook book?

NeverMore1701
10-08-2008, 13:59
I live in the swamps in Louisiana where nutria are outnumbering people. The state of Louisiana now has a program that they will give you $4 for every nutria tail you bring in to them. Great target practice with a .22. A popular way to use nutria meat is mix it half and half with pork and make boudin. Cajuns will eat anything that doesnt eat them first.

I grew up in Kaplan, so I'm right there with ya :wavey:

mxitman
10-08-2008, 14:48
I've had raccoon before and in fact was my very first animal that I hunted on my own when I was 12.

I went deer hunting as a kid and my dad said I could hunt Squirrel and Raccoon on my own in the woods behind our house with his .22 if I was careful and didn't shoot at anything else other than target shooting.:whistling: I tried like hell to get me a squirrel but I kept missing since I wasn't getting close enough. Once spooked they were gone, on my 3rd attempt to get a squirrel I spotted a fat and slow Raccoon..lol It was easier than I thought and was a quick kill.

It was a little disturbing cutting and gutting on my own not sure if I was doing it all right but it ended up clean and ready for the fire pit! I had helped clean 2 deer before that and that was all the experience I had. Mom was a little hesitant to try it but we spit roasted it over the fire and it tasted great to me, and have had one almost every year since then to remember the good old days when my dad was alive.

Pancho 12
10-08-2008, 15:27
I have also eaten ground hog which was excellent-MUCH BETTER THAN RACCOON. They are vegetarians similar to the nutria. Most farmers are glad to get rid of the ground hogs as they eat their crops (soybeans especially) and damage equipment when a vehicle wheel drops into their hole. Again, figure a way to make good use of the animal meat.

Really!?

Hmmm...My neighborhood is infested with 'em. Not our yard, though. My dogs kep 'em in check, plus my wife hates the "greasy bastards" and took one out with her G19.

They get big, too. You could eat good off one. I'll have to keep that in mind.

t3chman
10-08-2008, 17:39
Raccoon with Saurkraut

1 raccoon, cleaned and cut in pieces
2 1-lb cans of sauerkraut, drained
1 medium apple, diced
Vegetable shortening
Flour
Salt and Pepper
1 medium onion, diced
1 tbsp caraway seeds
1 bottle or can of beer

Coat raccoon pieces with flour, salt, and pepper. Brown in melted shortening in a heavy skillet. Drain the sauerkraut thoroughly. Add it to the chopped apples and onions with caraway seeds with enough beer to simmer. When heated through, put a laer in a roasting pan. Add raccoon pieces and top with the rest of the sauerkraut mixture. Bake at 350 degrees F for about 3 hours, or until tender. Add more beer if it starts to dry out.

t3chman
10-08-2008, 17:43
Roast Raccooon

1 raccoon, trimmed and cut in large pieces
1 package dehydrated onion soup

Trim as much fat as you can from the raccoon. To remove more fat, you can place the racoon meat in a large kettle, cover with cold water and bring just to a boil. Remove the meat pieces and place them in a roasting pan. Roast at 325 degrees F for 1 hour, then sprinkle with dry onion soup. Add 1/2 cup water to the bottom of the pan. Cover and continue to roast for 1 to 2 hours, or until tender.

Leigh
10-10-2008, 10:35
They get big, too. You could eat good off one. I'll have to keep that in mind.

I can't comment on coons but have eaten groundhogs (also called "whistle pigs" due to thier piercing shrieks) and the SMALLLER the better as the meat is much more tender.

Oldtimers claim the older, tougher ones actually taste like dirt (due to their burrowing nature).

If you like red/grey squirrel, you will like groundhog.

MattHappyTrails
10-10-2008, 15:02
Years back, as a teenager, I spent many a Winter night hunting raccoon around Sandy Hook, Conn (all built up today). Cousins sold pelts, meat to folks from the South who lived in Danbury. I had roasted 'coon and it was delicious. Wouls not hesitate to have it again if cooked properly. Google recipies.

bocephus549
10-16-2008, 14:35
Hell they still have BBQ "Coon Suppers" here in the south.

kerbie18
10-16-2008, 15:58
As the original poster, thanks for all the replies.

I very seriously doubt that I'll find myself in a situation where I am living off the racoon population, but I am glad to add this to my box of SHTF bag-o-information. :cheerleader:

ar15_dude
10-16-2008, 20:06
I've eaten coon and possum. My wife boils them, then bakes them with sweet potatoes. I prefer the possum, and it can be quite good. I've caught possums by hand or with a string. An easy to catch food source.

If y'all expect to survive when food gets tight, you'd better practice eating more than what you get at the grocery store. Country folk often consider city slickers naive when it comes to basic life skills. As Hank Williams Jr sings, "country boy can survive".

Pancho 12
10-16-2008, 21:09
I can't comment on coons but have eaten groundhogs (also called "whistle pigs" due to thier piercing shrieks) and the SMALLLER the better as the meat is much more tender.

Oldtimers claim the older, tougher ones actually taste like dirt (due to their burrowing nature).

If you like red/grey squirrel, you will like groundhog.

Understood and thanks...but if I'm cappin' groundhogs in my neighborhood for food, I'm pretty sure I'm past caring how they taste.

Until such time, I'll be doin' my hunting in the Kroger meat department.

OKgetdown
10-17-2008, 01:24
Mama just chased 'em off the porch with a broom.

:rofl:Coons.......racoons?:rofl:

Magicmanmb
10-18-2008, 07:40
Make sure you cut the scent glands out very carefully, wear heavy kitchen gloves also. I have a couple of old soul food recipe books that are way out of print but they dipped them in boiling water to get the fur off. Stuffed them with sweet potatoes. When I first moved here there was a fellow that went around to the black neighborhoods selling them from the back of his truck. Only problem is if they are feeding on trash thats what taste you'll get. Also about 2 out of 3 have rabies locally. They also eat opossum. Survival yes regular food nope.

hscrue
10-19-2008, 17:11
a couple miles down the road from me you can take your skinned racoons (leave the feet on) and get $10 a pop for them. Know several folks around here who hunt to put meat on their own table year round and trap racoons to supplement income. Pretty close to living off the land, seems to me!

Glad someone finally mentioned Rabies, though- racoons are frequently infected and carry the virus without getting sick themselves. Combine that with Baylisascaris, and you couldn't pay me enough to touch one! If things are that desparate, there are plenty of squirrels, doves, rabbits, etc. to keep me happy.

Magicmanmb
10-20-2008, 07:33
How many of you have seen a red fox in broad daylight? Had one in the horsepen next door eating one of the roosters, either very hungry or very rabid. I'm protected for a year though when we took the dogs to the rabies clinic one jumped pulled the needle out. Guess who got a mouthful of vaccine.

RWBlue
10-20-2008, 10:23
How many of you have seen a red fox in broad daylight? Had one in the horsepen next door eating one of the roosters, either very hungry or very rabid. I'm protected for a year though when we took the dogs to the rabies clinic one jumped pulled the needle out. Guess who got a mouthful of vaccine.

I saw a grey one many years ago while I was squirel hunting. It was moving on and ran about 20 yards in front of me and then was gone in the blink of an eye.

My brother had a red fox come up and sniff him while he was in full camo hunting turkey. My brother said it looked like the fox couldn't figure out what he was, but knew he didn't belong there.

sebecman
10-20-2008, 10:48
I have seen dozens of red fox in the daylight. None looked rabid

JonboyAu
10-20-2008, 15:49
Takeo Spikes, NFL linebacker, has it every Thanksgiving. Folks around here eat it cooked with sweet potatoes.

Magicmanmb
10-21-2008, 07:01
In our county we have very large rabid animal problem. A lot of people don't vaccinate there pets or give heartworm prevenative. I checked with a couple of area vets to get a price on having one of my *****es spayed $350.00 was the cheapest. Off Topic But why does it cost more for thedos to go to vet for a checkup than it does for me? BTW killed 2 opossums last night in the yard raiding the garbage. If anyone wants to chow down and your close pm me and yo.u can have all the coon & opossum you want

tlthe6th
07-11-2012, 20:03
A grey fox recently got 6 of my hens, 1 rooster and 4 chicks so I set one of those cage type traps to try and catch it. On the first morning after setting it I had caught a raccoon. Without really thinking, I just let it go, considering it wasn't raccoons which got my birds. Afterward I kind of regretted doing that. Especially after I found these two pieces of information.

One, I could have skinned it for it's pelt. Here is the best video I could find on skinning a raccoon:

skin coon - YouTube

Two, I could have eaten it. Here was the article I saw in that regards:

http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2009/01/13/59566/the-other-dark-meat-raccoon-is.html

I have since moved the trap to where I saw the foxes on more than one occasion, but I haven't caught anything yet (it's only been one and half days since). But now I hope I catch a coon again because I want to try it out !

mycriptonite
07-12-2012, 14:52
sure you can, just because they eat garbage, dont let that turn you off

tlthe6th
07-12-2012, 15:06
sure you can, just because they eat garbage, dont let that turn you off

Depends on where you live I guess. The raccoons that live in my woods eat bugs and berries and things like that..

http://www.a-plus-restorations.com/what-do-raccoons-eat.html (http://www.a-plus-restorations.com/what-do-raccoons-eat.html)

NeverMore1701
07-12-2012, 15:44
Only 4 years old!

tlthe6th
07-12-2012, 15:53
Only 4 years old!

Ha! I was waiting for that.. I came to this forum after doing a web search on eating raccoons.. this thread came up towards the top.. thanks for the welcome :crying: lol

collim1
07-12-2012, 17:28
Yeah you can eat it. Very fatty compared to squirrel, rabbits, and wild birds. A little gamey also unless cooked long and slow with heavy spice and some acidity from red wine vinegar or lemon juice.

My grandfather grew up in the depression and was very poor. The kids in the family used .22's, slingshots, traps, snares, etc... to kill any game they could for dinner. Coons, squirrels, pigeons, doves, possums etc...were all fair game. Lots of trotlines and jug fishing also. He was the youngest of 13 children, if you wanted food you had to beat the bushes for it.

From what he has told me the deer population suffered greatly and were hunted darn near to extinction in that area during the depression. Small game was the most readily available.

Mr Dean
07-12-2012, 19:53
I guess you can eat most anything depending on the availability. Not my first choice however.

Maine1
07-13-2012, 01:28
Woodchuck is a little better than a coon, BUT, like Shortbus said, ITS HOW YOU COOK IT. Cooked up a woodchuck, and really did a poor job- pressure cooker for 20 min (WAAAAYYY too long) then shake and bake treatment. it was OK except the texture was like it had been masticated already due to the pressure cooking. Might try a dutch oven after a quick boil next time.
I am NOT a cook, so don't look at me. When i was a kid there was an old indian guy up the road from us that would always take a coon to eat- he loved them.

Eating a Coon makes perfect sense, same with beaver, porkies, ect When all about you are sticking to their picky "rabbits and squirrels" diets and start getting tuleremia or rabbit starvation, you'll be livin', high on the hawg, well fed and dressed in warm, coon skins. I had an AWESOME coon skin cap when i was a kid, made for me by my uncle who was a trapper, with a silver fox tail. awesome, warm hat. My coon dog Bandit chewed it up when he was a puppy.
I'll eat anything. If it makes me a hillbilly, that's OK, I like hillbillies. I really like city folk too, nice and tender. Only have to clean them a week or so in the pit before we can butcher them. We save the good lookin' females for breedin' even though they ain't kin.

bdcochran
07-13-2012, 04:50
http://www.cooks.com/rec/search/0,1-0,raccoon,FF.html

Sure you can eat them.

My former mother-in-law is Italian. The snails in my yard are descended from the French snails. I would simply put them in cornmeal for a few days live (to clean them out), then cook them in olive oil, garlic, and basil. You would have paid $1 a piece at a fancy restaurant, but they were free from the yard.

You can even eat earthworms if you would like. You can eat lady bugs.

You can go to a fancy/hippie/vegan/health foods restaurant and eat flowers. I used to raise them and eat them.

http://www.ehow.com/list_6590566_types-edible-flower-petals-salads.html

pugman
07-13-2012, 05:33
If you plan on eating a Racoon...bring enough gun..or maybe dog. Just heard this on the news the other day.

She was ambushed by a posse of coons...

http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2012/07/raccoon-attack-sends-woman-to-hospital/

Look towards the bottom for the video...fair warning its mildly graphic

16 puncture wounds, 100 scratches and since racoons are notorious for rabies (even though this article doesn't mention it) three rounds of rabies vaccines and literally dozens of directly applied shots to scratches and bites

G29Reload
07-13-2012, 11:52
Nutria is good, plentiful and very healthy to eat.

Vegetarians.

And, we're lousy with them.

Reminds me of the Dave Attell's Insomniac show on Comedy Central.

New Orleans episode, he was out seeing what goes on at night while you're sleeping.

Hooked up with the local sherif s boys who used to cruise the canals sitting in a lawn chair in the back of a pickup truck, one guy on a .22, the other with a search light picking off nutria because they're such a pest.

At the end of his ride along, he jumped out of the back of the truck and looked right into the camera.

"Ladies and Gentleman, Animals WERE harmed during the making of this show. "


:rofl:

Woofie
07-13-2012, 15:07
http://www.cooks.com/rec/search/0,1-0,raccoon,FF.html

Sure you can eat them.

My former mother-in-law is Italian. The snails in my yard are descended from the French snails. I would simply put them in cornmeal for a few days live (to clean them out), then cook them in olive oil, garlic, and basil. You would have paid $1 a piece at a fancy restaurant, but they were free from the yard.

You can even eat earthworms if you would like. You can eat lady bugs.

You can go to a fancy/hippie/vegan/health foods restaurant and eat flowers. I used to raise them and eat them.

http://www.ehow.com/list_6590566_types-edible-flower-petals-salads.html

I've got a couple rose bushes; never realized the petals are edible. Anyone know if they're any good?

I know an old timer who used to hunt coons when he was young. "Sold the fur to the white folks and the meat to the coloreds."

dcc12
07-13-2012, 17:22
Ancient Chinese saying: If it swims, slithers, runs,or walks with its back toward Heaven, then it is edible.
Lots of people in the South have eaten Raccoon, Possum,frog legs and other critters.
BTB Raccoon is much better than Possum IMHO.
I Really want to try guinea pig. Have seen a few episodes of Bizarre Food where Andrew Zimmer raves about it.

NOLA_glock
07-13-2012, 20:50
Anything is good in a sauce piquante.

certifiedfunds
07-13-2012, 21:05
Reminds me of the Dave Attell's Insomniac show on Comedy Central.

New Orleans episode, he was out seeing what goes on at night while you're sleeping.

Hooked up with the local sherif s boys who used to cruise the canals sitting in a lawn chair in the back of a pickup truck, one guy on a .22, the other with a search light picking off nutria because they're such a pest.

At the end of his ride along, he jumped out of the back of the truck and looked right into the camera.

"Ladies and Gentleman, Animals WERE harmed during the making of this show. "


:rofl:

Jefferson Parish, LA. Was Sheriff Harry Lee's deputies.

Nutria are not native and they eat the roots of plants that anchor the soil......destroys the levies.

Word is the McIlhenny (Tabasco) family brought them up from South America for the fur and dey got loose cher

G29Reload
07-14-2012, 00:50
Word is the McIlhenny (Tabasco) family brought them up from South America for the fur and dey got loose cher


Well they gave us hot sauce and something for the 'reds to shoot at, so could we forgive em?

:rofl:

alexanderg23
07-17-2012, 08:11
Raccoon Man - YouTube

http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20090402/METRO08/904020395

smokeross
07-17-2012, 10:48
Ancient Chinese saying: If it swims, slithers, runs,or walks with its back toward Heaven, then it is edible.
Lots of people in the South have eaten Raccoon, Possum,frog legs and other critters.
BTB Raccoon is much better than Possum IMHO.
I Really want to try guinea pig. Have seen a few episodes of Bizarre Food where Andrew Zimmer raves about it.
Motto for Boy Scout Troop 357 in Kenai, Alaska. "If it walks, swims, or flies....it dies. Then we eat it."

mac66
07-18-2012, 11:11
I ate porcupine once on a bet. It was very difficult to dress out and they smell horrible. Tried roasting, boiling, frying it. The meat was pretty gamey and tough. Pretty disgusting actually.

Maybe as a last resort but not worth the effort if there are other critters about.

Angry Fist
07-18-2012, 11:31
Eating a Coon makes perfect sense, same with beaver, porkies, ect When all about you are sticking to their picky "rabbits and squirrels" diets and start getting tuleremia or rabbit starvation, you'll be livin', high on the hawg, well fed and dressed in warm, coon skins. I had an AWESOME coon skin cap when i was a kid, made for me by my uncle who was a trapper, with a silver fox tail. awesome, warm hat. My coon dog Bandit chewed it up when he was a puppy.
I'll eat anything. If it makes me a hillbilly, that's OK, I like hillbillies. I really like city folk too, nice and tender. Only have to clean them a week or so in the pit before we can butcher them. We save the good lookin' females for breedin' even though they ain't kin.
:animlol: Thanks dude...

Mike2
07-19-2012, 12:20
Racoon is actually very good when cooked correctly, I prefer to soak in buttermilk over night then dredge in flour with a little Tony Sachery's added in and a little red pepper then fry until almost done. Pull the 'coon out make a milk gravy with the oil and little tasty bits left in the pan cut up an onion and add to pan then put the coon back in and cook for a couple hours on simmer. Fall of the bone tender and really good with a pan of buttermilk biscuits!!! Yum yum!!! dont forget the black burns syrup and a glass of tea and you are good to go

OMEGA5
07-20-2012, 04:35
A neighborhood close to mine has a TON of racoons. I've seen ten of them eating out of the same dumpster.

The thought occured to me...are they edible? I mean, if you were starving to death, and you cooked the hell out of it. I really don't see it happening, but I was just curious....

Tastes like dog but yes, coon's good eating when
you're hungry.
Dano :harley:

Huntinfool
07-25-2012, 15:47
Racoon is actually very good when cooked correctly, I prefer to soak in buttermilk over night then dredge in flour with a little Tony Sachery's added in and a little red pepper then fry until almost done. Pull the 'coon out make a milk gravy with the oil and little tasty bits left in the pan cut up an onion and add to pan then put the coon back in and cook for a couple hours on simmer. Fall of the bone tender and really good with a pan of buttermilk biscuits!!! Yum yum!!! dont forget the black burns syrup and a glass of tea and you are good to go

I tried possum once when I was real young and stupid! LOL!

I have eaten coon and loved it as well as groundhogs. If I ever am reduced to having to eat possum again. I will capture him alive and clean his system out with something besides garbage and carion. Then maybe I will be able to stand it!

Actually I found this whole thread kind of funny. My grandpaw was a coon hunter and I guess I've had coon and groundhod about everyway it can be fixed.

~HF~

tlthe6th
07-25-2012, 15:56
Nice! Its good to know this stuff if anyone ever has to, or wants to for that matter, eat small game like that. Me being new at living in the sticks have come to realize that I would only eat things like that out of necessity.. But "to each his/her own" when it comes to this issue.. :) Whoever wants to eat whatever I say God bless em..