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Bill Powell
10-18-2008, 18:31
I think I posted this years ago, in another thread, in a different department.

In Korea a slicky boy is anyone who makes his living primarily by stealing. Today something happened that reminded me of a small incident that happened in the summer of 1961, in Munsan-ni Korea.

It was a dark and stormy night. Well, not really, but I love to say that. It was night, but there was a nice moon, and you could see without the aid of artificial light. I was walking guard duty in a petroleum pumping and storage yard. The place was fenced by an eight foot high fence with razor wire at the top and thre rows of concertina wire on either side at the bottom. Well, I was walking my post from flank to flank, and taking no crap from any rank. It was during one of my strolls along the south fence that I saw a little white stake driven into the ground. I didn't remember that stick, it wasn't there on my last round. I knelt down and looked, and saw a hole of ideal Korean crawl size going all the way through our many rolls of concertina. I thought about this for a second, pulled the stake up, and moved it ten feet west, where I drove it back into the ground.

Then I went looking for my slicky boy.

I found him in a pump shed, where he was strealing engine parts. I snorted and yelled and ran toward him like I had his murder on my mind. He jumped up and ran, leaving his parts, tools and all right there on the ground. When he saw his white stake he dove from about eight feet out and hit where he thought his hole was at full speed.

It took me and an MP awhile to extract him from that wire. All the while he was looking at his white stake. He was bleeding from a hundred cuts, none of them serious, and all he could do was look at that white stake. Slicky boys lost that night.

fabricator
10-18-2008, 18:33
:rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl:

PBCounty
10-18-2008, 18:34
I think I posted this years ago, in another thread, in a different department.

In Korea a slicky boy is anyone who makes his living primarily by stealing. Today something happened that reminded me of a small incident that happened in the summer of 1961, in Munsan-ni Korea.

It was a dark and stormy night. Well, not really, but I love to say that. It was night, but there was a nice moon, and you could see without the aid of artificial light. I was walking guard duty in a petroleum pumping and storage yard. The place was fenced by an eight foot high fence with razor wire at the top and thre rows of concertina wire on either side at the bottom. Well, I was walking my post from flank to flank, and taking no crap from any rank. It was during one of my strolls along the south fence that I saw a little white stake driven into the ground. I didn't remember that stick, it wasn't there on my last round. I knelt down and looked, and saw a hole of ideal Korean crawl size going all the way through our many rolls of concertina. I thought about this for a second, pulled the stake up, and moved it ten feet west, where I drove it back into the ground.

Then I went looking for my slicky boy.

I found him in a pump shed, where he was strealing engine parts. I snorted and yelled and ran toward him like I had his murder on my mind. He jumped up and ran, leaving his parts, tools and all right there on the ground. When he saw his white stake he dove from about eight feet out and hit where he thought his hole was at full speed.

It took me and an MP awhile to extract him from that wire. All the while he was looking at his white stake. He was bleeding from a hundred cuts, none of them serious, and all he could do was look at that white stake. Slicky boys lost that night.


:rofl:

USMCsilver
10-18-2008, 18:36
LOL! Great story! Awesome to think to move the stake.

Bill Powell
10-18-2008, 18:51
This happened the same evening, about an hour an a half earlier. Whe had an airborne ranger first Lt. that loved to catch guards and the like in compromising situations, guard wise. One of his favorite things to do was Daniel Boone some nervous kid, sneak up on him and take his weapon.

Sharon, remember that wailing, flailing creature that came charging out of the bushes. It was the same officer a couple of months before he got his jaw broken.

A friend and I were talking when I saw this officer, who was OD, trying to sneak up on us and create some mischief and get us in trouble. He was sneaking along some tank cars, working his way to a shed he could hide behind, a shed we had to walk past. I backed behind the shed til the Lt couldn't see me and had my partner stand where he was, like he was talking. I went down the other side of the cars, stopped and pulled off my boots and came up behind him. You should have seen his reaction when I challenged him from about five feet behind his back. He came up sith some lame assed story about how he thought we were in trouble.

Trigger_Rush
10-18-2008, 19:03
The slicky story is absolutely epic.

okie
10-18-2008, 19:08
That's awesome Bill:rofl::rofl:

PBCounty
10-19-2008, 01:31
This story can't go back to page two so fast. Bump it up.

Bill Powell
10-19-2008, 07:58
Since no one was shooting at us on a regular basis Korea was a fun time. Our big danger was stepping off a regularly used path and stepping on a mine. Occasionaly some North Korean infiltrators would come south and set up an ambush, shoot a couple of jeep passengers and haul ass south toward Seoul. Solution to that was I never drove a jeep on that particular piece of road.

Fixxer
10-19-2008, 08:32
So it was Occam's Razor Wire, huh?

Great story, anti-slicky crusader.

bocephus549
10-19-2008, 08:50
That story made my morning.

ateamer
10-19-2008, 15:32
Keep 'em coming - and sticky this thread.

Bill Powell
10-19-2008, 15:45
Bait and switch was a real popular means of lifting money from the GI. Cameras and Radios that could be bought for next to nothing at the PX was, depending on the item, worth a fortune on the local economy. So, a GI could be walking along a street with a Petri Pentax 35mm on his arm and a Korean would pull him into an alley and shove a big roll of cash in his face for the camera. The GI would go, "Cool, check out all the cash. Sure I'll swap." One or two tens wrapped around a bunch of ones and quarters, and the guy would get about fifteen or twenty dollars for his Camera, or Radio, or whatever. From a nickel up was paper when I was there.

Another favorite of theirs was to run out from between two buildings and grab the tail gate of a truck. By holding onto the tail gate with one hand it was easy to match the speed of the truck, since the speed limit was so low. What we did was work out a signal where, if you heard a horn blow three times fast you were to lock up your brakes. When you're running two feet behind a truck at twenty MPH and it suddenly stops, you run into it really hard. First time I saw it the guy wound up in the back of the truck. When the MP's got him he still wasn't sure where he was, or even who he was.

Zombie Steve
10-19-2008, 15:50
:rofl:

Bill, you're killing me.


What happened today that reminded you of slicky boy?

Bill Powell
10-19-2008, 16:01
We're a non-smoking house, since I no longer smoke my wife has set up a smoking station for those who do smoke in the front yard. There's one little bastard who comes into the yard almost every night and steals her butts, along with the ash tray. She's found them all over the neighborhood. So, I arranged a nice ash tray, with butts only about half smoked. To sweeten the deal I took a needle and pulled about half a dozen horse hairs through each butt. It was while I was pulling the horse hairs through the last butt that I rememberd the little white stake.

I can't kill you, you're a zombie. I did buy a Saiga-12 T-shirt that has a picture of a Saiga, and the line, When it absolutely has to be killed--again.

Minskin85
10-19-2008, 16:13
dude i want a tshirt like that

DrMaxit
10-19-2008, 16:15
Very nice! I love the stories. Hell you should post a few solutions for the guy thats having trouble with punks vandalizing the neighborhood. Sounds like you could sure think of some clever stuff for him.

Keep em comin'

paynter2
10-19-2008, 17:11
Thanks Bill - good to hear from you!

Bill Powell
10-19-2008, 18:16
I been wondering about you, paynter2, where you been?

To find the T-shirt I went to google and typed Saiga-12, and one of the sites was a T-shirt company. It may have been www.saiga-12.com. I don't know for sure.

paynter2
10-19-2008, 18:31
I been wondering about you, paynter2, where you been?

To find the T-shirt I went to google and typed Saiga-12, and one of the sites was a T-shirt company. It may have been www.saiga-12.com. I don't know for sure.

I've been around. I was fishing in Canada for a while. It's really strange up there in the fall. There are a lot of Americans up there in spring and summer, but it's really empty in the fall. You're 20 miles from a paved road and another 20 miles from the landing, by boat. You just hope and pray nothing goes wrong. But, you have to go because next year you might be too old to do it!

I finally ran some Stabil through that last boat today. I drained and refilled the lower unit. I didn't fog the cylinders. I'm wondering if that fogging is a scam. I have never fogged a lawn mower in my life - yet they start and run fine in the spring. What's with that?

I taped the Barrett-Jackson auction this weekend. I see a low mileage LS6 went for about $60K. Last year that car went for twice that much. I guess the economy is affecting the rich too!

I miss your on-going thread on OAF. I always knew where to find you. I hope you are well. Pray for us poor soles in the north country. If may be a while before we surface again.

p.s. I'm gonna go find a T-shirt.

Bill Powell
10-19-2008, 18:39
Such as it is, you can find me right here. I'll try to post often enough keep it from going away, and there may be a few repeats from before, but I don't think it will matter cause people forget, and the population has grown by thirty thousand since I was doing that.

I'm not crazy about a lot of those magic cures. The best that can be said for fogging is that it should not hurt the engine.

EagleOne716
10-19-2008, 19:16
Bill...
Yu Numma 1 GI....
Yu take me to big PX'e??????
I luv you LONG TIME :)
2ID 1988-1989

rhikdavis
10-19-2008, 19:16
To sweeten the deal I took a needle and pulled about half a dozen horse hairs through each butt. .

What does that do? They inhale the hairs?

paynter2
10-19-2008, 19:57
Such as it is, you can find me right here. I'll try to post often enough keep it from going away, and there may be a few repeats from before, but I don't think it will matter cause people forget, and the population has grown by thirty thousand since I was doing that.


Yep - lots of them haven't heard the Chinese restaurant and Greek dry cleaner joke. Some people at work nearly hurt themselves laughing at that. It's one of my all-time favorites...

Bill Powell
10-20-2008, 04:39
If you are a smoker, did you ever light the filter by mistake? Tastes about the same, it's just harder to figure out why it tastes so foul.

I still like Chow Ling, Paynter2.

Problem was that just after, 'love you long time' was, 'you pay now"

I was in First Cav, Hdq Co-Postal division for the Christmas rush, then 15QM, petroleum distribution.

Bill Powell
10-20-2008, 18:22
My nephew was in Korea, south of Seoul. He had a girl he was madly in love with and she was looking forward to exploring the big PX He bought her a diamond ring that cost him almost a thousand bucks at the PX. Couple of days later she said, "Lose ring. You buy me nuther at PX."It took him awhile to realize he was being conned. It involved a second ring which got lost after two days.

KING-PIN
10-20-2008, 19:01
http://www.glocktalk.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=159340&stc=1&d=1224550856

:rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl:

Bill Powell
10-21-2008, 04:52
The guy most hated by my fellow GI's and me in Munsan-ni, Korea in 1961 was a guy who lived in the Seoul area and had a friend up on the DMZ at the Ninth Cav area.

North of Seoul, in the First Cav area, was still on war time logistics. For us it meant no civilian clothes, no personal cars, no off post housing, no nada.

What this guy did to earn our hatred was to drive up to see his friend every weekend, or so. It was not that he drove up to see his friend that irritated us, it was what he drove up there in. Remember, the only way for us to ride in a civilian car was to go down to Seoul and take a UN sponsored taxi. They had new '61 Chevy's. Oh yeah, what he drove. Those of you old enough will remember.

The guy taunted us by driving by in a black 1955 Pontiac two door hardtop, lowered, with side pipes, Appleton Spotlights, Olds fiesta spinner hub caps, Mercury Turnpike Cruiser fender skirts, and a Continental kit. We created enough drool to give him a car wash if he had needed it. Did I mention that he also wore civilian clothes? Following him around was the sweet sound of dual exhaust with glass pack mufflers. Jerk.................

Bill Powell
10-21-2008, 18:08
The barter system was the popular way to get stuff done on the civilian economy. You could get a five ton truck painted and re-stenciled for four jerry cans of gas, and you furnish the paint. gotta gol

Bill Powell
10-21-2008, 19:08
what I was saying before I had to go was that gasoline was the biggest bartering tool, followed closely by cigarettes, and finally luxury items from the PX. I traded a cheap camera for a .45 auto, I don't remember the mfg. or the year. It doesn't matter, it was a hell of a rat killer.

We'd lay in bed in town and shoot those big barn rats off the roof beams of the house. The roof was straw so it didn't hurt that, and we chose our direction so the rounds landed in a mine field. Word gets around, so MP's started hanging around. Then, one day a guy showed up from the states with a shoe box full of little single barrel colt derringers. We went to the PX and bought .22 Thunderbolt shorts. The rats were just as dead, and it was a lot less noisy. You did have to aim between the eyes, as sometimes they charged when they wuz wounded.

roar
10-21-2008, 20:40
Hahaha, killer rats! Thanks for sharing your stories Bill, they are great.

Jefs
10-21-2008, 21:02
Hahaha, killer rats! Thanks for sharing your stories Bill, they are great.

+1 on that. I really like reading stories like those above. Keep 'em coming, Bill :thumbsup:

Bill Powell
10-22-2008, 04:38
The killer rat story is not original. One of my favorite series of cartoons is Up Front with Willie and Joe, by Bill Mauldin. He was a cartoonist for Stars and Stripes through WWII.

Anyway, in this one cartoon Willie and Joe we lying in the loft of a French barn and there was a big rat perched on Joe's knee. Willie was holding one of the old L-shaped GI flashlights, lighting up the rat, and Joe was aiming a cocked M1911 at it.

Willie was saying, "Aim between the eyes, Joe, sometimes they charge when they's wounded." Love that cartoon.

I had a cartoon published in Stars and Stripes one time. It a very early logo proposal for the Air Cav. It was a tiger with a .30 caliber air cooled under his arm, and a beanie with a helicopter propeller on top. This was the summer of 1962.

Bill Powell
10-22-2008, 04:58
I rmemeber the first time I drove through a village and saw a German shepherd hung between two poles, being skinned, in preperation for his contribution to Sunday's stew. We had a hell of a time keeping our mascot dogs alive and healthy.

Bill Powell
10-23-2008, 18:56
Well, I got my Texas CHL today. I guess that's some kind of news. I took the test in February. I thought they had forgotten me. I don't think it will affect how, or when, I carry a weapon that much.

I told this story many years ago, and where I told it has gone away, to a better place, I'm sure.
Its heading was military wisdom; and other Oxymorons

When I worked in the post office one of our duties was to process the air mail, and being air mail, it would by-God be flown where ever it went.

Just south of Munsan-Ni was auxiliary airfield belonging to 15th Aviation Company, of the first Cav Div. They had a collection of odd looking machines that would actually rise up in the air and go places. Sikorsky H19's, Otters, Beavers, Birddogs, and Hueys and a couple of OH-1's. They all sounded like land animals and an overweight cartoon character, but they flew reasonably well. They were what we used to make sure the air mail stayed airborne.

Anyway, we would process the airmail, take it to 15th Av Aux, and do a hand off to the flyboys. Then, we would drive, through Seoul, to Kimpo AFB. We would have our coffee, drive out to the flight line in time to intercept our boys in wing adorned green, take the air mail from them and take it to the Kimpo terminal and toss on a US bound plane. Then, we would collect our First Cav air mail, take it out to the flight line, and do another hand-off to our little air force.

We would then drive back to Munsan-Ni through Seoul, process our surface mail, and drive back out to 15th Av Aux, pick up our air mail, take it home and process it for the individual units scattered through-out the First Cav.

We wasted two hours a day insuring thaqt our air mail was, indeed, AIR MAIL.

Bill Powell
10-23-2008, 19:41
Nother thing that happened at 15th Aviation Company's auxiliary airfiel was a drone unit. A small remote controlled fixed wing aircraft that was launched by booster rocket from a rail on the back of a five ton truck. Actually a second thing happened at this airfield. In the main hanger were kept two aircraft. One was a Dehavilland Beaver, and the other was a brand new Huey. They were the personal aircraft of the division commander. The OD paint was hand rubbed laquer, the exposed aluminum parts were polished, the first cav logo was in kind of a metallac chrome yellow, and the interior was done in a natural tan glove leather. Both planes were totally illegal, but he was the division commander.

I was in a sky-diver club and we were at the airport doing PLF's, when one of the drone pilots showed up. He had an audience and he was proud. At the same time he was cool, and he was about to demonstrate technology to us beyond our comprehension. He just oozed cool while he was setting the truck for a launch. He unveiled the drone, attached the wing and, making sure we were impressed crawled up into the pilot's seat and hit the launch button. At that point a weak point in his plan showed up. In his effort to impress us, he launched a little low, and missed clearing the roof on that hangar by about two feet. Hell of a mess, and he was no longer cool. Amazingly, there was no fire.

paynter2
10-23-2008, 19:50
Hi Bill - just got back from the city and logged on to get my GT fix. I was happy to see this thread was still alive. I read to catch up and LMAO!

I can personally attest to killer rats. I grew up in a small town. Entertainment was sometimes lacking - but guns were always present. We used to go to the local dump to shoot rats. Once in a while one would charge - that's when the auto-loaders stood out over the single shots...

Another small town, rural, sport was skunk shooting. The same landfills would attract skunks at night. We'd roar in sitting on the fender of car with a loaded .22. You shot the skunk or he shot you!

That '55 Pontiac sounds cool alright. A friend used to drive his uncle's '59 Pontiac. I think it had an early version of the 389 - I don't know what induction it had - probably just a 4bbl - I don't know if the tri-power was available back then. Anyway, it was a 2-door hard top with a three speed on the column. That was one fast car. We were out raising hell one night and lost a cop in a chase. Funny how brains seem to increase with age... Go figure.

Bill Powell
10-23-2008, 19:58
You could get tri-power along that time. The Bonneville came out in '57 with fuel injection and real limited choice of colors. My next door neighbor bought a '59 two door post sedan with standard transmission and tri-power. He used it pull his stock car. The 389 became available in '59. Before that it was a 347 cu in. That was a fun time and fun cars.

paynter2
10-23-2008, 20:11
You could get tri-power along that time. The Bonneville came out in '57 with fuel injection and real limited choice of colors. My next door neighbor bought a '59 two door post sedan with standard transmission and tri-power. He used it pull his stock car. The 389 became available in '59. Before that it was a 347 cu in. That was a fun time and fun cars.


Was the 389 an upgraded version of the 347 (bored and stroked)? Was it an early, and somewhat lesser, version of the Chevy 409?

This '59 was sort of a beige/pink color - interior was a matching color. Not the best looking color - but that thing would haul ass. We'd hit a asphalt road from a gravel road and lay two perfect strips of rubber for 100 feet.

The smell of raw, leaded, gas pouring down a big 4bbl and the sound of rubber burning and that 4bbl sucking air is one of the greatest memories...

WHOAAAAAA!!! (shift) SCREEEEEECH WHOAAAAA!!! I'm smiling while I write this.

These were muscle cars before there was 'muscle cars'.

Bill Powell
10-23-2008, 20:31
The 389 was sort of a evolutionary update of the 347, but the 409 Chevy was a totally different animal. The 409 was not a ninety degree engine. It was more like 72 degrees and the combustion chamber was in the upper cylinder. The engine was ninety degrees but the top of the block was cut on an angle. You had to bolt a boring bar adapter to the engine to bore it. The boring bar adapter made the block deck 90 degrees. I think the block code was W.

Several friends and I took an easy credit course, driver trainig. We all had driver's licenses but they didn't know whether you had one or not. The driver's ed car was a new 57 Pontiac, with 347, four barrel, dual exhaust, and standard transmission. Back then you had to take your driver's test with a standard, or have an autmatic restriction put on your license.

Anyway, we got to wondering if that Pontiac was as bad as the magazines said, and came up with a way to prove it. I was driving back to the school one day and caught a red light. When the light changed I dumped the clutch and stalled the car. I re-started the car, revved it up to about four thousand RPM, and dumped the clutch. The girl in back seat's job was to scream and grab the teacher around the head, blocking his vision. After we were settled down I was saved from an F because the guy behind me told the teacher he distracted me. So, our price for the thrill ride was to sit in on a lecture about safety and lack of distraction, a lecture given by one of the worst driver's I've ever ridden with, our driver training instructor.

paynter2
10-23-2008, 20:45
Okay - I thought the 409 was a stroked and bored 348. I learn more here by accident than anywhere else by design...

My DTI was an old WWII vet. He was a really nice guy that students had zero respect for. Now, years later, every one of those students realize how poorly we treated the guy.

Many of my teachers fought WWII. This DTI, shop teacher drove a landing craft at Omaha beach - many repeat trips. The AG teacher spent two years in a German POW camp. There were others - I wish I had been old enough to appreciate these guys when it counted - before they were gone.

A guy from my home town bought a '66 396 Chevelle. He and his buddy were drag racing one night. The buddy had an old Olds with the frame cut short. He actually had molded fiberglass seats in it. That rat would run.

Anyway, the Chevelle outran the guy and stopped - over the hill. Here comes the Olds and BAM! The Chevelle was totaled with less than 300 miles on it. The Olds driver is still a legend in that small town.

Bill Powell
10-24-2008, 04:33
The 409 was an up graded 348. The 348 started the odd block design.

Next, rats in grain barrel

Bill Powell
10-24-2008, 19:45
In Tulsa I worked with a guy who lived along the river between Tulsa and Sand Springs, Okla. One day he was in the yard doing lazy stuff, stuff that required no energy output. While he was managing energy he started hearing a scratchy sound, which he finally pinned down to a grain barrel. There was stuck grain in the barrel. He looked in the barrel and the noise was coming from and saw two or three of the big barn rats that had gotten in the barrlel and had eaten so much they couldn't get out of the barrel. He turned around and called, "Here kitty, kitty, kitty." He picked up this trusting cat, walked over and stuffe the cat in the grain barrel. The cat ran up his arm, the side of his neck, his head, and possibly thin air to get away from those rats.

After a settling down and forgetting period he called, "Here kitty, kitty," and the idiot cat came to him again. Just before the barrel the cat realized where they were going and spread his legs to where he could get a grip on that barrel with all four legs. My friend could not push the cat in the barrel.

His final solution was to cut off about a quarter stick of 60% dynamite, cap it, fuze it, light , and drop it in the barrel.

Bill Powell
10-25-2008, 17:59
I remember one of my very first posts in the old 'BILL'S STORIES'. It dealt with hauling all the left over Thanksgiving day treats sown to the edge of town, and passing them out ot all the kids that would come to my truck. It was a hell of an experience for me, and opened my eyes to the fact that Korea, and Korean daily life, was not just like us.

Bill Powell
10-26-2008, 06:20
In the year and a half, (almost) that I was in Korea we experienced a military coup, one massive demonstration agains the Japanese, the worst typhoon in fifty years, and a US military currency change-over.

The coup was when when Park overthrew the government. It was totally corrupt and needed change. Things actually got better afterwards, but during, it was a slightly nervous time to be traveling through Seoul and have to thread your through sand bag bunkers, and tanks on every street corner. What made me nervous was to have one of the machine guns, or the main gun on a tank track me as I drove by. I know it was probably as much from boredom as anything on their part, but...............................

Before Park you may capture the same slicky boy three or four times in a week in the same area. You'd turn them over to the local police and they'd turn them loose. After the coup, when you turned over a slickey boy to the police you never saw them again.

The demonstration took place at Kimpo AFB, which was also Seoul's main airport. The Koreans were having the best rice crop in fifty years and some Japanese agricultural experts were going to go over and help them preserve it. The Japanese occupation was still fresh in the minds of the Koreans and about 275,00 Koreans showed up at this smallish airport daring the Japanese to get off the plane. They didn't.

Shortly afterwards that typhoon came along and absolutely destroyed the fine rice crop.

All US military pay was in script (military payment certificates), and tens of thousands of dollars of it was in circulation in the local economy. One morning we woke up and found ourselves in lock-down all over the country. All our old money got turned in for the new money. Enlisted personnel could exchange $380.00, Sgts $500.00, and officers $1000.00. The only thing I ever saw done in absolute secrecy. All the wealth in the villages was, from that moment on, useless.

paynter2
10-26-2008, 07:04
All US military pay was in script (military payment certificates), and tens of thousands of dollars of it was in circulation in the local economy. One morning we woke up and found ourselves in lock-down all over the country. All our old money got turned in for the new money. Enlisted personnel could exchange $380.00, Sgts $500.00, and officers $1000.00. The only thing I ever saw done in absolute secrecy. All the wealth in the villages was, from that moment on, useless.

I hope the dollar isn't going the way of the script...

Snow and 50mph winds today. Need any help with the antique cars down in Houston?

Bill Powell
10-26-2008, 09:43
The way they run the air conditioner in the building I sometimes think I'm where you are.

Slobberchops
10-26-2008, 09:51
I rmemeber the first time I drove through a village and saw a German shepherd hung between two poles, being skinned, in preperation for his contribution to Sunday's stew. We had a hell of a time keeping our mascot dogs alive and healthy.

:steamed:


I know Korea is different than here, but...

Bill Powell
10-26-2008, 10:25
Sorry. It's really rough on cats there, too. They're a real delicacy there.

This may help your feelings a little. One of the canine guys tied his dog over at the corner of the hooch after lunch so he could take a nap. He tied him away from the door because being an American did not make you a bite free zone.

A korean on his way to town saw that 100 lbs of fresh meat lying there and decided he'd look good in his stew pot. The dog actually slept til the Korean got him untied.

They threw him a real nice funeral a couple of days later.

During the Olympics the Chinese catered to the westerners and took dog off the restaurant menus during the event.

Bill Powell
10-27-2008, 17:25
The port of Inchon, Korea is a shallow water port, or was then, which meant the ship had to park about a mile or so off shore, and all material and personnel transfer was done by LCT (landing craft, tank). When the water was rough it was a hundred nineteen feet of bluntnosed attitude. When our Christmas bulk mail came in it was usually in ten or twelve containers, the old square containers. Mostly water proof, or at least water resistant. It was an adventure unloading these things. The ship's crane would put them on the LCT, and shore cranes and fork lifts performed their version of a Chinese fire drill getting off the LCT and onto lowboy trailers. Then we had to stand on the trailer with automatic weapons, like the Koreans were going to try a heist on 10,000 pounds of Christmas cards and 5,000 pounds of rancid fruit cake. If I thought there was a serious chance of a heist I sure wouldn't be standing on that trailer, like a stationary target.

I used to love military convoys. A bunch of trucks all in a row, police escort, blow through all the red lights and stop signs, and above all, be inconspicious.

Bill Powell
10-27-2008, 20:21
Just got a container from Costa Rica cleared through customs today. A couple of custom Packard woodie station wagons.

Here's a Packard I was working on today. I installed the side trim, and am building a supercharger pressure pot, from two pot from Wally World. One side view of the car before trim. Guy spent ten years building this car.

Bill Powell
10-27-2008, 20:26
so, now I got pictures

Slobberchops
10-27-2008, 22:42
Sorry. It's really rough on cats there, too. They're a real delicacy there.


Not a problem, no offense taken or meant, just like I said it's a different culture.

It had to be very hard on any GI that adopted an animal (dog, cat, whatever) whilst there and have them disappear.

That is a fine looking car! :wow:

Bill Powell
10-28-2008, 04:31
It started life as a 1949 Packard Custom Eight four door sedan. A lot of work has gone into it.

Bill Powell
10-28-2008, 19:11
One of the cars turned out to be a '49 Cadillac woodie wagon, a car Cadillac never made, but should have. I forgot my camera today. I'll take some photos of it tomorrow.

Bill Powell
10-29-2008, 04:40
Anyone else wish Hallowen would come and go. Maybe that marathon of really baad horror movies will go away.

Sapperstang
10-29-2008, 07:23
I was there in 00 and they are still at it.

Zombie Steve
10-29-2008, 07:27
Mr. Powell, please write a book... Slicky boy sounds like a good title.

:wavey:

Bill Powell
10-29-2008, 18:32
Here's the Cadillac I was talking about yesterday. Cadillac never made a car like this.

Bill Powell
10-29-2008, 19:06
In the winter of 1961, or in preperation for the winter of 1961, we ordered winter gear, parkas, mittens, Mickey Mouse boots, and winter field pants. One day a box car arrived with 38 bales of clothing on board, winter clothing we assumed. We assumed wrong. We had gotten 38 bales of olive green mosquito netting.

We were told we could order new gear, and emergency order, but we could not possibly return the netting because they would not screw up an order. Our new stuff came in in just about a week, the stuff we should have gotten in the first place. We took the idendtifying wrappers and tags off the winter gear and put it all over the worthless netting.

Then we put the netting on the dock, by where the supply train parked, with little or no guard. When the train pulled that evening, the netting was gone. One of the guys on guard at the railhead saw the bales being pushed out of a boxcar as it left Munsan-ni, heading south. Boy, I'll bet those slicky boys were pissed when they cut those bales open.

Bill Powell
10-29-2008, 19:10
My damned pictures went away again. I can't figure that one out.

dissthis
10-29-2008, 19:14
Today something happened that reminded me of a small incident that happened in the summer of 1961, in Munsan-ni Korea.


What happened today??:dunno:

Glockwork Orange
10-29-2008, 19:20
I worked my way thru college as a slicky boy!!!

rhikdavis
10-29-2008, 19:23
I think I saw that MASH episode. I always wanted to slap Hawkeye around some.

Bill Powell
10-29-2008, 21:12
dissthiss, see post #15 on page one.

Bill Powell
10-30-2008, 17:40
In the spring of 1961 I was in the hospital for a month, with pneumonia. I thought I had it bad til I encountered the glass house. The glass house was a set of sealed rooms built into the hospital. Living in the glass house were some guys that were totally and forever screwed. They were all dying, slowly. They could not be healed til they were given the proper treatment for their ailment, and they could not be given the proper treatment til they could determine what they had. Some mysterious Oriental ailment that the western doctors had not a clue about.

I'm sure the ones that are still alive are still there.

paynter2
10-30-2008, 18:26
Some mysterious Oriental ailment that the western doctors had not a clue about.

What a different world the Orient is...

64F today Bill - I took the day off and went fishing with a friend. Fresh walleye for dinner.

Bill Powell
10-30-2008, 19:21
Aren't you afraid that eating all that walleyed fish is going to affect your vision? We mkoved three Pontiacs today. A '64 GTO, a '69 GTO, and a '72 Firebird with the 455 HO engine and the Ram Air hood. Last of the smog free Pontiacs, and very healthy.

JellyBelly
10-30-2008, 20:15
In the spring of 1961 I was in the hospital for a month, with pneumonia. I thought I had it bad til I encountered the glass house. The glass house was a set of sealed rooms built into the hospital. Living in the glass house were some guys that were totally and forever screwed. They were all dying, slowly. They could not be healed til they were given the proper treatment for their ailment, and they could not be given the proper treatment til they could determine what they had. Some mysterious Oriental ailment that the western doctors had not a clue about.

I'm sure the ones that are still alive are still there.


Nah. Stuff like that would go straight to the CDC nowadays. They'd find out what it was, or at least what kills it.

Bill Powell
10-31-2008, 04:44
You're probably right. I keep forgetting how new modern disease control is. This was 1961 and disease control was barely in it's infancy. Of course, there are some diseases they cannot touch today, they can only contain them til they run their course.

Bill Powell
11-02-2008, 17:42
I was eleven days short in Korea when the Berlin Wall reared its ugly bricks and stones and concrete. I carried my swagger stick for one hundred and eleven days. The main thing that irritated me was that I already had a flight on the new jet service, non-stop from Seoul to San Francisco. You got to Calif two hours before you left Korea.

By the time the extension ended the only way back was by boat, in my case the General Breckenridge, a WWII troop transport designed to haul 650 soldiers. We had 1400 on board when we pulled out of Inchon. Twenty two days afloat. The boat was 640 feet long, which seemed like a lot til you got caught in the middle of a typhoon, in the middle of the Pacific.

We had one fire on the ship on the way over. A paint locker caught on fire. Paint lockers make a lot of fire, and smoke. The captain was in the process of stopping the ship for possible evacuation when they got the fire under control.

Bill Powell
11-04-2008, 18:09
I used to cross the Freedom Bridge over the Imjin River every day or two. It is an old railroad trestle, converted to a one way bridge with MP stops at either end. They regulated one way traffic. Right beside the bridge are some piers sticking up out of the water. Word has it that during the retreat from the initial North Korean attack a colonel was assigned the task of blowing the brisge after all the UN troops had crossed. He got a little nervous and blew the bridge prematurely, trapping tons of UN troops north of the river. The bridge is on the longest railroad right of way in the world, running from Pusan to Moscow. They probably have new bridges by now.

There was lot of history, good and bad, connected with that bridge.

Bill Powell
11-09-2008, 16:16
I was going through Seoul one day and got into a pissing contest with this passenger vehicle next to me. He kept crowding me and wouldn't move over when my lane narrowed. I finally got tired of it and decided he was going to be the next one to give way. We came to a place where my lane went away to my left and the vehicle to my left continued straight, right along those tracks: TRACKS???? Jesus Christ it's a street car. He couldn't give ground. I climbed the curb trying to get away from him but it was not enough. We hit hard enough to rock me up on two wheels, him, too. I slowed down and crossed over behind him and didn't stop til I got out of Seoul and back into the First Cav area. When I checked my truck I had pieces of that street car stuck all in my truck, including a big chunk of 2x4 jammed between my tire and wheel on the rear. I drove with a whump-whump coming from the axle til I got home. Had to dismount the tire to get that wood out.

I felt kind of stupid that I didn't notice the street car tracks til that moment.

Bill Powell
11-09-2008, 16:28
Did you ever put a cigarette between your palms and shuck it by sliding one palm forward and one back? Turn it into tobacco dust. Hold that thought.

On the Frankfurt/Mannheim autobahn one day ther were tow M-52 tractors and trailers traveling side by side. From the factory these M-52 tractors have little 4-1/2 or five inch mirrors that shake up and down and don't give you much vision.

These two rigs were being followed by an impatient jeep from Kaiserslautern. For some reason the left truck moved over onto the left shoulder, leaving a gap between the two trucks. The jeep shot into this hole in order to pass the trucks. When he was well committed the left truck moved back to the right, trapping the jeep between the two semi's. The truck on the right saw what happened and slammed on the brakes. The left truck kept on going.

Remember that cigarette between your palms? That's what happened to the jeep. The two truck drivers were standing dreading what they would find when they heard cussing from under the pile of scrap metal that used to be the jeep. That jeep rolled up in a ball around him and all he got was a few scratches.

Bill Powell
11-09-2008, 20:33
I learned early on, my first trip through Seoul actually, that you cannot be the gentleman you want to be at crosswalks and other pedestrian encounters. On, I think, my first trip through Seoul I saw a little old lady at a crosswalk and stopped to let her cross. When she started moving she suddenly became 10,000 people and I sat there twenty minutes waiting for that crosswalk to clear. It never did. I finally wound easing through the crowd blowing the horn, which they mostly ignored.

I found out how to clear an intersection on my second trip through Seoul. I drove one of the old GMC duece-and-a-half's with the vertical exhaust stack. It was a natural for the ignition bomb. You turn off the ignition for a bit and let gas accumulate in the muffler, turn the ignition back on and, 'BOOM",

I guess it was their fairly recent memory of bombs and artillery cause when that accululated gas exploded all the Koreans disappeared.

Damn, talking about the gas bomb makes me remember that I posted a version of this, years ago.

paynter2
11-09-2008, 21:27
Hey Bill - I'm just catching up on some GI's BS before I go to bed.

The walleye dinners are done for a while - have to let the lake freeze. I guess I'll have some fresh venison for breakfast tomorrow. Life is tough.

A little 6pt hung out around the house, with his sister, all summer. When he rubbed the velvet off (early Sept), they split up. Well, he came through my yard every morning and every evening - you know what they say about being predictable...

I pulled the back-straps out after I hung him in the garage last night. It's been pretty cold up here - I think the high today was 23F. He's cooled down by now - I'll bone him out tomorrow and have some good eatin' for a while. He should last until the lake freezes! :)

Chad Landry
11-09-2008, 23:59
Good reading, Bill.

Check your notifications when you get a chance.

Bill Powell
11-10-2008, 19:09
Quartermaster is broken down into several issue classes. Class 1-goodies- Class 11, Class !!! Which was petroleum distribution. The enlisted boss of Class !!! was a Sgt Furlan. He was on his fourth tour in Korea, and had a family in Korea and one in the States. He was always in the Munsan-ni area. He was a pretty good Class III sgt except for one major mind fart he had while getting a duece-and-a-half tanker ready for a trip to The ordinance depot for some repairs. Part of prepping the truck was flushing out the 1200 gallon tank .

here's how it went down.

Our compound was a little short valley between two hills, with obligitory little creek that runs through the compound, under the fence, and across the rice paddies and through Munsan-ni and on to the Imjim River a couple of miles away.

Sgt Furlan drained the tank, pumped in about a hundred gallons of water and did it again, all of this draining into this little creek. Water is heavier, right? After it is finished, and all is right in Furlan's world, he lit his pipe and tossed the match over his shoulder, one of those big old stick kitchen matches. That match land in a pool of gasoline 1/16 of an inch deep, thirty inches wide, and about two miles long. About thirty seconds after he threw that match he had a wall of fire thirty inches wide by five feet high and about two miles long, right across the rice paddy and through town. The Koreans were some excited. It wasn't very dangerous, but it was spectacular.

Bill Powell
11-11-2008, 19:23
You ever know a bully? Almost everyone has one in their life in some fashion. In Korea we had a guy named Petri, a big, hulking guy who went through life practicing intimidation. He was big enough that people just assumed he was a bad guy to have against you.

Naturally, being a bully, he made life miserable for one of the smallest guys in the unit. The guy begged him to leave him alone, and the more he asked the more it spurred Petri on. This went on for a couple of months, til johnston was almost in tears, not in fear, but frustration. He finally threatened to Hurt Petri and this was so funny to Petri he started to give Johnston an atomic wedgie. When Petri grabbed his shirt Johnston slapped him on the ear. This was possibly the first time Petri had been hit in his life. When the shock of the pain started to go away and Petri started to sit up-right Johnston slapped him on the other ear, again and again, and some more. By the time it was over Petri was a quivering wreck. He wouldn't go to town, and flinched when you got close to him. I never heard what happened to him, cause like most soldiers you knew overseas once they rotate out they're history.

Jefs
11-11-2008, 19:48
Damn, I love reading your stories Bill. I feel as though I was almost there. Keep 'em coming for those of us who've lived a life less eventful.

Bill Powell
11-11-2008, 20:10
Thank you jefs, it didn't feel eventful at the time. Of course I did have the world famous jeep wreck. Our officers were having a New Year's party in their billets/'club combo. They did a very unauthorized requisition of a jeep, and sent me to fetch Red Cross girls and Donut Dollies from a couple of villages over, and return them after they'd been bred. What I meant to say was entertained, sorry. It was about ten below and the whole country was a popcycle. On the way back with Holstein Hanna I slammed on the brakes to avoid hitting a dog. The right front brake dropped into a pothole just as the brakes locked, flipping us end over end into a rice paddy thirteen feet below. No mammals were injured in the crash, and the jeep wasn't bad, windshield frame, spare tire bracket, hood, rear bumpers, etc.

This happed Friday just before midnight. Monday morning at reville that jeep was sitting on the ready line with new paint, new hood, new top, new windshield, etc.....................................It was never mentioned.

Bill Powell
11-14-2008, 18:22
.................

Jefs
11-14-2008, 22:44
.................

Bill, you're being a too little cryptic with this post. You need to artfully and pictorially, as you've done in posts past, lead us into experiences of your past. Your stories, well written, are very enlightening and entertaining for those of us who've lived lives a little more routine (I mean I've no unauthorized jeep, or female, requisitions to date to report.)

Let us 9-to-5 office boys in on your action past!

pierced456
11-14-2008, 22:50
I was stationed at Camp Casey korea 1989-1990. Just wanted to let you know we still called them Slicky-Boys so many years latter. Standing order in my Co. anyone who caught a Slicky-Boy got a 3-day pass.

Bill Powell
11-15-2008, 07:49
I had started something and changed my mind, and didn't know how to make it go away completely.

The national pasttime in the villages around Munsan-ni was stealing MP jeeps and hiding them a few buildings away. This worked great until someone got the bright idea to put KATUSA (korean army training with the U S army) MP's in the jeeps to raise the alarm when someone tampered with the jeep.

Everything was pretty normal. The MP's parked the jeep and went into a club to check on the GI's. You know, make you nervous through intimidation so you'll do something stupid so they can give you a citation. When they got inside hands were laid upon the jeep, the KATUSA blew his whistle and all hell broke loose. There was a huge black guy named Arland Bounds that the MP guys cornered. Arland didn't want to go so one of them hit him between the eyes with his night stick. Arland reached up, grabbed the night stick and hit the MP between the eyes, at least on the helmet liner where between the eyes would be. The helmet liner split in two, right down the middle, and the MP sat on the front bumper of the jeep, and Arland went home. He was still sitting there when I ran by. I got away by running between some houses, but in doing so I stepped in a honey bucket right up to mid-thigh. How does one describe the delicate aroma of a honey bucket. You ever fall in an outdoor toilet that been left to its own devices for about three generations?

The bus wouldn't give me a ride, the guard truck wouldn't give me a ride, and no one else I approached would give me a ride. I had to walk home, over the mountain, being very careful to stick to the path, because I think I've mentioned that Korea was one vast uncharted mine field.

I got back to camp Jessup late, but the gate guards didn't report me because one whiff told them I had already suffered more than anything they could do to me.

Batesmotel
11-15-2008, 08:15
We had a two man team that would hit the tool dept. at the store I worked at.
One would come in at a very fast walk, grab a power tool and bolt for the emergency exit. The other guy would be outside the door in a truck. The first guy would hit the door and jump into the back of the truck and be gone. Total time in store was less than 15 seconds.

An employee saw the truck pulling into the lot as he was heading out to lunch so he just backed his truck up to the emergency door and waited. A few seconds later he heard a thud on the inside of the now blocked door as the get away driver sat and panicked. He drove off as we finally got his plate number.
The inside guy injured his arm and face by hitting the door at a full run. They charged both of them with all of the tools we had video of them taking for months. The official story was that he must have missed the crash bar on the door this time.

Rager
11-15-2008, 08:28
I have a good buddy who was drafted, saw combat and was shot up pretty good in Korea.

One of his stories was early on. Another fellow talked him into going to town and getting some booze and broads, ya know! Being 18 and full of everything, it didn't take much convincing that the dood knew what he could get away with.

Nighttime. They were both just crawling underneath the fence when they heard a 12 gauge shotgun rack. Kaa-clunk. About 3 feet away I guess. He said his butt pucker-r-r-ed. Needless to say the MP convinced them to never do that one again.

Rager
11-15-2008, 08:34
We had a two man team that would hit the tool dept. at the store I worked at.
One would come in at a very fast walk, grab a power tool and bolt for the emergency exit. The other guy would be outside the door in a truck. The first guy would hit the door and jump into the back of the truck and be gone. Total time in store was less than 15 seconds.

An employee saw the truck pulling into the lot as he was heading out to lunch so he just backed his truck up to the emergency door and waited. A few seconds later he heard a thud on the inside of the now blocked door as the get away driver sat and panicked. He drove off as we finally got his plate number.
The inside guy injured his arm and face by hitting the door at a full run. They charged both of them with all of the tools we had video of them taking for months. The official story was that he must have missed the crash bar on the door this time.Ahh, what a nice heartwarming story!

Bill Powell
11-15-2008, 18:21
Two people in an isolated post that you do not mess with too much are the postal workers or the quartermaster. I was in Korea a long time before I ever had a pass. If an MP asked for my pass I offered up my mail card instead. It did command respect, because we the only contact they had with America.

One of the fuel truck drivers got an article 15 from an MP that he could not talk him out of. The next time he hauled fuel to the MP compound he stopped the fuel guy at 600 gallons or so, and stopped by the civilian truck wash by the river and had them top it off with river water.

For the next couple of weeks if you saw an MP on the road he was driving a borrowed artillery jeep, or infantry, or whoever would lend them one. An absolutely unproveable infraction.

Bill Powell
11-18-2008, 19:00
One of the trucks I used to drive occassionally was a 1940 Nissan. It was virtually a 1940 Chevy 1-1/2 ton, with right hand drive. Going around a right hand turn was always a thrill because when the tires had turned about 20 degrees you hist a dead spot in the steering gear and it freewheeled for about three rotations, where it causght and started turning again.

I was following a big Russian truck one day whan the differential started looking odd. The differential housing was broken in two just to the right of the differential. They had a chain supporting the axle, two chains, actually. One on either side of the break.

On the main road in the center of Seoul there was wide spot in the road where the civilian trucks parked, side by each, for the cold winter night. In the morning they would build fires under the oil pans of the truck, and sometimes the fifferential. They would barbeque these trucks til the oil was thin enought to flow through the engine.

Bill Powell
11-23-2008, 10:01
After a period of time in Korea you become tired of being financially, and sometimes physycally, abused by the Korean civilians and you dip into your own bag of dirty tricks.

The Koreans would walk down the road with a pile of straw eight feet high on an A-frame and some of the GI"s thought it was great fun to stuff an M1 Garand into the top of the straw and fire a blank. It almost always starts a fire.

The Korean stoves were a double walled unit that burned a pre-cast charcoal block. If you took two or three tear gas capsules and put them between the lids you could clear out that bar. They did not like tear gas.

Most of the hobby centers had huge speakers mounted on the roof for playing Christmas carols and such like that. If take that same turntable, put on a record of a Corvette hot-lapping Lagun Seca, and turn the volumes up to about eight, you can cause the local village to start packing for possible evacuation. Sounded a lot like the early war piston engined fighter planes.

Get a mouth full of lighter fluid, and when you meet someone on the road light your lighter and blow the mouth full of lighter fluid past the fire. It makes you look like a fire breathing dragon.

They delivered beer on the back of a bicycle. They stack the cases about six high. You could drift over close to the bike and snag two or three beers from the top case.

One day we came upon a bicycle carrying a pig, no, a hog, weighing about three hundred fifty pounds. He was tied to the luggage rack of that bicycle upside down. What was normally his hangy down parts were now his sticky up parts. I handed my rider a machete and told him to smack those sticky up parts with the flat side of the blade. Last thing I saw 'er we drove out of sight was an angry cyclist on his ass in the dirt, and the hog going over the paddy dike with the bike sticking straight up.

Eyescream
11-23-2008, 10:57
One day we came upon a bicycle carrying a pig, no, a hog, weighing about three hundred fifty pounds. He was tied to the luggage rack of that bicycle upside down. What was normally his hangy down parts were now his sticky up parts. I handed my rider a machete and told him to smack those sticky up parts with the flat side of the blade. Last thing I saw 'er we drove out of sight was an angry cyclist on his ass in the dirt, and the hog going over the paddy dike with the bike sticking straight up.

:rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

I don't have anything to add, but I love your stories, Bill.

Bill Powell
11-23-2008, 19:26
We had three ammo alerts while I was in Korea. One was Thanksgiving eve, 1960. One was when Park had his little coup. One was when the Berlin wall was built. Bastards.

We had an alert every month. The first thing we did was look out the window at Munsan-ni. If they were still in bed we just went through the motions. Bright green cammo nets against pure white snow just lack something.

The Thanksgiving eve alert the Koreans were not running south, but the were milling around in the streets looking confused. Not a scheduled alert. A division of North Korean armor was barreling down on the DMZ. Just as they got to the wire they made made a U-turn and laughed their asses off.

During the coup was just precautionary. Tensions were a little high.

You could tell when someone was going to the field. The hookers would head for the woods with their mattress rolled on their back, along with the beer vendors and others.

Bill Powell
11-27-2008, 10:20
One day I was doing some first echelon maintenance on my truck. I was told later that what I was doing was actually third echelon maintenance and I was not supposed to do it. I was just a lowly enlisted person and did not know this, and besides, by the time I was told that the job was finished. The truck I drove most of the time was a gas powered 2-1/2 ton tanker with a Continental engine with an old Mercury tea-pot carburetor and a total of three governers. It was a two barrel carb with one barrel blanked off with a gasket with no hole in it. It had a vacuum diaphram that restricted throttle movement, and a governer on the distributor that limited advance. After I was finished I had the fastes 2-1/2 ton in Korea, and just about the fastest vehicle overall. I found one MP 3/4 ton that would outrun me, and one M-113 armored personal carrier, back when they still had the Chrysler 383 engine. In a land with a 20mph speed limit, running eighty makes you feel like a god.

Anyway, after I was finished making my truck my kind of legal I went into the shop to tell the motor sgt he could put his mind at ease cause my truck was back together and it was running. When I went into the shop a 3/4 ton from another unit had come in with a leaky gas tank. The Korean civilian welder had just pulled the tank sloshed water in it a coupla times and fired up the torch. I asked if he was going to solder the tank and he said yes, and I said, "Bye-Bye." They were all laughing at me when I cleared the door of the building, and just as I cleared it I heard this KAWHOOOMP. I went back in and the weldor was standing there holding his blown out torch, what little facial hair he had was gone, and the front half of his head full of hair was severely singed. The gas tank looked like he had tried to re-invent the basketball. It was almost perfectly round.

They were not laughing anymore.

Bill Powell
11-28-2008, 10:54
In the spring of 1961 they issued Winchester trench guns (12 ga) to us for guard duty. Shortly after that they hired a private Korean security force, and they got our shotguns. Their instructions were simple: If you lose something to a Slicky Boy on your guard post, y0u pay for it, from your $12.40 per month salary. You would hear from a guard post--HALTHALTHALT-BOOM BOOM. Slicky Boy losses went way down after they buried about ten slicky boys. If I had done that I would still be paying that Slicky Boy's family.

Bill Powell
11-29-2008, 08:55
I discovered one dy that driving a fuel tanker can be hazardous to your health, although I have to admit that the pain I suffered was largely self-inflicted. The self-infliction was due to some modifications I made to my truck to speed up the fuel delivery process. I by-passed the governor speed restrictions to the pump unit where it would pump about 105 gallons per minute instead of the normal 70' ish gallons per minute.

I was delivering fuel to the motor pool of the 12th Cav. I had the lid off the tank, and was sitting on top of the tank with the hose delivering fuel. With that extra flow you had to keep a firm downward pressure on the nozzle. Well, I relaxed and the nozzle jumped out of the tank and sprayed the top of the tank which was concave, withe low spot spot being where I was sitting. Well, it was warm, the top of the tank was warm, and the gasoline was warmish. Sort of pleasant at first, and then a sensation of having wet myself, and then my nether regions started to burn. I know some of you have gotten gasoline or other petroleum product on you skin and haven't washed it off in time. Imagine that pain in an area where the skins is seldom exposed to abuse. Every pore on my bottom side (in a seated position) had a water blister and felt like a boil. Speaking of boils; they felt like a couple of ostrich eggs.

I drove back to my unit standing on the running board with the door open and using the hand throttle. I found a gear that felt pretty good and just left it there. An ointment with a touch of pain deadener in it can be your friend at a time like that............

Rager
11-29-2008, 10:18
Last thing I saw 'er we drove out of sight was an angry cyclist on his ass in the dirt, and the hog going over the paddy dike with the bike sticking straight up.
Jeez, am I glad I drank all my coffee already!!

Rimmer
11-29-2008, 11:07
Thought I'd show a pic of a '55 for those that are not familiar.

http://i367.photobucket.com/albums/oo115/Zoftic/55.jpg

Bill Powell
11-29-2008, 15:53
Lose the purple and gloss the black and that could very well be the car. Where did you find that? Not many people doing Pontiacs.

Bill Powell
11-30-2008, 09:29
What's the worst thing you ever had to stare at for any length of time?

In early 1961 I was in the hospital with pneumonia. I was in the hospital for a month, and for a week and a half of that right across the aisle from me was an awful sight. The army wasn't real big on private rooms, or even privacy curtains, so it was either look or sleep.

A young Korean civilian laborer had gotten trapped between the frame and track of a D-8 Cat. That space is only an inch and a half or two inches wide. When that tractor was finished with him the lowest part of his body were his testicles. His legs had been torn off at the hip socket, leaving a huge open wound on either side that they were trying to seal off with strip grafts. Three or four times a day they had to drain the open fissures with basters. They couldn't cover it because the weight of a sheet was too painful. He had no buttocks anymore so he had to lie along the edge of the wound 24/7.

They were trying to stabilize him so they could transport him to a better hospital in Seoul, or Japan. I guess they stabilized him because they moved him out, finally.

I've never said this about anyone that didn't deserve it, but I kind of hope he died, because no one should have to go through life like that. The only reason I mention this is because it gives testament to the amount of damage a human body can take, and survive, whether he should survive or not.

Bill Powell
11-30-2008, 17:20
Some of the coolest security I saw in Korea was the PX warehouse compound. All the goodies coming into Korea, to the PX system, came through that warehouse. The kind of stuff that slicky boys' dreams are made of.

They had an arched entry way, with live guards. The rest of the fence was two fences about five yards apart with an open runway between. This space was occcupied by some nasty attitude dogs who loved the taste of Korean meat more than anything.

Very simple and very efficient.

Bill Powell
12-01-2008, 20:22
What would you call the signature sound of the twentieth century? I was reading through a book by an author I was not familiar with, a guy named Lee Child, and suddenly I was reading my own thoughts. I had picked the sound years ago and did not know anyone else had even dwelt on it.

Some may say the drone of an Aero engine, and early morning dawn patrol in a Spad, or the lonely sound of a single plane in 1940 or '41. Some may call it the sound of a ground vibrating low flying jet. The whup whup whup of a helicopter. All sounds never heard before the twentieth century. There are other sounds born in the 20th century.

But, the sound that is the signature of the twentieth century is the squeaking and clattering of tank tracks on a paved street. It was a sound heard in Warsaw, Rotterdam, Stalingrad, and Berlin. More recently in Budapest and Prague, Seoul and Saigon. It is a brutal sound, the sound of fear (unless your're an A-10 pilot). Probably the ultimate unfair advantage is the M1A1 Abrams. No other tank can begin to hurt it, with its armor from hell, depleted uranium sandwiched between high strength steel. Mr Child singled out M1A1. My though was just tanks in general.

How about it, boys und girls, anyone have any thoughts on that?

Bill Powell
12-02-2008, 19:08
You ever see a tank explode? I've seen three, two complete and one partial. One was a M-47, one was an M-48, and one was an M-60. Two were in Korea and one was in Germany.

The partial was the only unavoidable incident of the three. I was supporting the 4th infantry brigade, and was parked by their headquarters tent. I had a 5000 gallon tanker, there was a 1200 gal tanker beside me, and there were two trucks loaded with artillery rounds. About forty yards in front of me an M-48 was making its way down a little creek and when it got to the bottom of a small hill it made a left turn out of the creek. When the off side track (which was my side) dug in to make the turn it detonated a Russian box mine right under the track. It broke the track, blew a fender off, and a few other items attached to the hull. The crew had that tank vacated before it settled back to the ground. The thing that saved everone's butt was that it was just one mine. For anti-tank they usually stacked two or three. It had washed down the creek from somewhere else, and being a wooden box mine normal mine detecting efforts didn't detect it.

The M-60 happened in Germany, in '65. A company of tanks was convoying back from the Baumholder tank range to Kaiserslautern and in some little village they crossed an electric train track. The weak point in their plan was that someone failed to stow the whip antennae and it touched one of the overhead wires. That set off the electric primers, exploding all the on board ammo. 105 mm rounds were flying all over the place. Two old German guys were sitting in front of a gasthaus drinking beer when one of the rounds headed straight for them. They stopped drinking til they realized the round was going to clear them, then went back to their brew. It went through the roof of the gasthaus and wound three floors below, in the basement. This one I did not see happen, just the aftermath.

The other one I actually saw was the M-47 in Korea. It was during Operation Snow Tiger, and the temperature was 26 below zero. The crew was trying to keep warm with C-ration can heaters (can full of sand, soaked in gasoline). When one of the guys shifted his weight he kicked over the heater and the burning gasoline ran under a bulkhead to the tank's freshly topped off fuel tanks. Hit the fire extinguishers and they didn't work, so the crew un-assed the tank. A short time later 76 rounds of 90mm, 24 rounds of 90mm blanks, several thousand rounds of .30 and .50 cal, and an assortment of flash bang thingies, and couple of hundred gallons of gasoline went off simaltaneously. The tank jumped about twenty feet in the air, rolled the one inch thick steel floor of the tank back lie a sardine can. The engine and transmission went one way and the tank went another. One of the more spectacular things I've seen. The salvage crew took one look at it, loaded it on a flat car, and took it straight metal re-cycling.

Bill Powell
12-04-2008, 20:02
Anyone ever have anything explode right in your face?

CatsMeow
12-04-2008, 21:35
Anyone ever have anything explode right in your face?

M16. Kaboom, ammo problem, I think. Just wrecked the upper receiver, but fortunately just nicked my face. I've been very picky on the ammo I run through my personal rifle and pistol ever since.

Rager
12-04-2008, 22:36
Anyone ever have anything explode right in your face?
Not my story but of a former coworker.

Seems a few mechanics were taking a drive (wheel) hub off of a (insert brand) road grader. Removed the wheel and went at it.

Had it inside in a work bay. We--l-l-ll those hubs are on a taper/ on a taper shaft. So they gets a big ass PortaPower and rigs it up to pull it off. And they pump and they pump, something like 50 tons. They had all of it in.

Well the damn thing isn't moving, cough cough, so they all decide to head over to the break room and get a coffee. Mmm, ok.

They're all, all 4 or 5 of them, not the fellow that's relating the story mind you, about 10 or 12 steps away from the machine when KA-plewwy!! the hub lets go. And goes right through the cinder block wall of the bay. Several had been standing directly in front of it 30 seconds earlier.

(note, the correct procedure would have been to "talk" to the hub, as you're applying pressure, with a very large hammer. Better known as a sledge. And probably cage it, or even place some wooden blocking so it wouldn't just blow.) Wheew.

Bill Powell
12-05-2008, 06:06
I've had a few, but my most memorable one happened at Camp Bullis west of San Antonio a few miles.

I was working for a construction company that was moving two metal building to Lackland AFB in San Antonio. The job required a weldor and I was it. We demolished the two building at Bullis and moved them to new slabs at Lackland. There are girts that support the walls on metal buildings and normally the are installed with the CEE facing down so they do not become a trash collector. These buildings were built with the CEE of the girt facing up, and they were full of garbage. Garbage like practice grenades, brass, paper, and live rounds and unfired blanks. Where the girts passed the building beams stiffening clips were welded and had to be cut off with a torch. I was up on top of too short a ladder and could not quite look over the top of the CEE. While I was burning the clip I burned into an M-16 blank and it exploded about nine inches in front of my face, with the leg of that CEE between my face and the explosion. To this day I do not know whey I did not fall off that ladder with a lit torch in my hand, because I was deafened, flash blinded and just generally had the crap scared out of me. I had a couple of small pieces of brass in my hard hat cause it was the only thing sticking over the top of the girt. I rounded up a taller ladder, and very carefully checked my burn area after that.

All things considered I would rather have been in St Louis that day.

paynter2
12-05-2008, 07:05
Hi Bill - I see it's cool in Houston this morning. I suppose you southern folk really suffer below 40F. Better than the Korean winter I'm sure. Better than the zero we have here this morning too.

While reading your post about the signature sound of the 20th century I didn't think of the military. I was thinking of a big block V8 engine with a 4bbl carb in full song. It may not be the 'signature' sound - but is sure sounds good.

Stay warm. :wavey:

Bill Powell
12-05-2008, 18:53
I know what you mean. I was driving that Bud Moore Mustang today, the old Trans Am car. Boss 302 with NASCAR style megaphone exhaust. We werre also driving the Enzo Ferrari today, adjusting the clutch. We found out one of our friends has a Ferrari diagnostic computer with and Enzo program. He fine tuned the clutch for us. The clutch on the Enzo is computer controlled and you have to have a computer. It has a sweet sound all its own.

But, there were internal combustion engines in the nineteenth century.

Rager
12-06-2008, 05:38
Heh heh,

I did some choke repair on a friend's Quadra-Junk, just kidding - the later ones were just fine, on his oem 454 equipped SeaRay. You know, when the bits in the choke start loosening up. the stops don't release the secondaries.

Much later in the year he was hinting that I didn't fix it correctly. Being a late model Q-Jet with vacuum secondaries he kept waiting for that big sucking sound. (grin)

Bill Powell
12-06-2008, 06:03
The Quadra-Jet is one of those carburetors for which there is no substitute for experience. It's way the hell over-complicated for the job it has to do, and the early ones had that leak-down problem; That Mustang I was driving yesterday has about an eleven million CFM Holley and that Boss 302 makes just about as much HP as the 302 Z-28 Camaro. It has a five inch locker clutch with four discs. About the only way to make it work is to get some RPM's built up and just slide your foot off the side of the clutch. That's why all those race cars on TV leave the pits with the tires smoking. They have have the same type of clutch.

paynter2
12-06-2008, 06:12
Bill - did we see that Bud Moore Boss 302 on Dream Car Garage a while back. It had an awesome sound to it. IIRC, it had the yellow paint with the black stripe too - the best package IMHO.

Bill Powell
12-06-2008, 19:13
The same. I was driving it in the distant shots, and the Dream Car Garage guy drove it part of the time. It's crude as a rock hammer and has no right to get around a track as fast as it does. George Follmer signed it but it was probably driven most by Jerry Titus.

I did something today that not many people can do, and I'm not sure they'd want to. I managed to make a diesel truck back fire and catch on fire. Now, if I got to get all truthful I'll do it now. What actually happened was that I got impatient and decided to hurry up the start up on a 7.3 Ford diesel with some starting fluid.One reason you're not supposed to spray hot fuels in a diesel is the effect a red hot glow plug has on ether. Luckily I had stopped looking into the end of the air hose, ause the fire shot out of the hose three feet. Not one of my more clever moves.

Las week I had the same problem with a 1900 Milwaukee steam car. Usually it starts right up, but this time it just refused. I touched the fire to the flash hole and the resulting explosion blew the seat off the car.

paynter2
12-06-2008, 19:43
The same. I was driving it in the distant shots, and the Dream Car Garage guy drove it part of the time. It's crude as a rock hammer and has no right to get around a track as fast as it does. George Follmer signed it but it was probably driven most by Jerry Titus.

I did something today that not many people can do, and I'm not sure they'd want to. I managed to make a diesel truck back fire and catch on fire. Now, if I got to get all truthful I'll do it now. What actually happened was that I got impatient and decided to hurry up the start up on a 7.3 Ford diesel with some starting fluid.One reason you're not supposed to spray hot fuels in a diesel is the effect a red hot glow plug has on ether. Luckily I had stopped looking into the end of the air hose, ause the fire shot out of the hose three feet. Not one of my more clever moves.

Las week I had the same problem with a 1900 Milwaukee steam car. Usually it starts right up, but this time it just refused. I touched the fire to the flash hole and the resulting explosion blew the seat off the car.

LOL :rofl::rofl::rofl:

When I was a kid, growing up in Wisconsin, we used to drive around the country in an old 6cyl/3spd Chevy. We'd look for cows near the road - then shut off the ignition until we were close and turn it on again. BANG! You'd never believe Old Bossy could run so fast - tail straight in the air!!! :shocked:

That damned old '63 Chevy was the best winter car of the time. We didn't all drive AWD or 4WD back then. The underpowered car would lug, in second gear, through impossible amounts of snow. It was our favorite ice fishing vehicle.

Rager
12-06-2008, 21:44
I managed to make a diesel truck back fire and catch on fire. Now, if I got to get all truthful I'll do it now. What actually happened was that I got impatient and decided to hurry up the start up on a 7.3 Ford diesel with some starting fluid.One reason you're not supposed to spray hot fuels in a diesel is the effect a red hot glow plug has on ether. Luckily I had stopped looking into the end of the air hose, ause the fire shot out of the hose three feet. Must have more than 2 glowplugs burned out. 3 or 4 out and then you gotta get the smelling salts. I drive a '91 Super Duty (F450) for a work truck. If it's an older one with the glow plugs in the open, 2 ohms or less is the spec. ;)

Rager
12-06-2008, 21:47
That damned old '63 Chevy was the best winter car of the time. We didn't all drive AWD or 4WD back then. The underpowered car would lug, in second gear, through impossible amounts of snow. It was our favorite ice fishing vehicle.My ex-wife learned stick on her dad's '63 work car. He gave it to me when he bought a van. I didn't drive too much though. Shifting it was like playing "Surgeon". heh heh

Bill Powell
12-07-2008, 07:21
It has 270,000 miles on it and it's huge; long bed, crew cab one ton. But I paid a dollar for it. Guy just wanted it out of his yard. Even at a dollar I'd feel I got screwed but he put two hundred dollars worth of batteries a week before he got sick of it and just wanted it gone.

paynter2, our car of choice for beating the bushes was an old '29 Ford Model A. Just a platform and a hood, and not much else. It had 3X21 inch tires and they would knife down through the sand ti they found something solid and continue on. It wasn't fast but it would never stop.

Our cars of choice for building the cut down sand buggies were the early fifties Pontiac six cylinder automatics or Chrysler products with fluid drive. They had a standard transmission with clutch and pressure plate, but they also had a torque converter. We would make dual wheel rear axles with like an 820X15 tire for the inner and a 670X15 for the outer. On a hard surface road you would be riding on the big tire, and if it started to sink into the sand the small tire would make contact, doubling your footprint area.

Bill Powell
12-08-2008, 05:57
Back to the Milwaukee, we use Coleman camp stove fuel and the vapor is like any other gas; explosive.

Bill Powell
12-10-2008, 06:03
I got the Milwaukee running yesterday. I guess it was just in a bad mood last week. It's a low pressure steam system, 225 PSI boiler pressure with a small two cylinder vertical steam engine which dirves a chain sprocket.

DrMaxit
12-10-2008, 09:05
Bill these are GREAT man, keep em up! You should have your own sub forum on here.

Bill Powell
12-10-2008, 19:11
Thank you DrMaxit. Korea was, for the most part, a fun time in my life. I said earlier, a couple of years ago, when you put teenagers in charge of weapons of mass destruction, explosives and otherwise, there is the chance for some nasty crap to happen. I think it is amazing that as many of us survived as did.

One thing that got a few people was the local hooch, spefically White Horse Gin. Working in the post office we were responsible for mailing bodies home after graves registration was finished. What we got in the post office was skeletal remains, unidentified who been lying in the dirt for seven or eight years. We got them in a rubber body bag. One day we got one that was not supposed to come to us, but to pathology. Major mix-up.
A sgt in a local artillery unit had gotten his head smoking on White Horse, got back to his bunk, stuck an M-2 carbine in his mouth and put 23 rounds in the top of his mouth before his dead toe fell off the trigger. From the chin up he didn't exist. We had a kid who loved to look in the body bags to satisfy some morbid curiousity. I had been trying to get him to stop doing that, and I figured that with this mis-directed bag I could cure him of some of that curiousity. He unzipped the bag, looked down in there, and started throwing up. He never came to the post office again, for any reason.

Bill Powell
12-11-2008, 06:01
I can't believe it. Snow in Houston. Not much in west Houston, but more than four inches in east Houston.

Rager
12-11-2008, 07:23
I can't believe it. Snow in Houston. Not much in west Houston, but more than four inches in east Houston.Enjoy it while you can Bill. Heh heh heh

I worked for a fellow who saw Chattanooga get a nice inch or two, maybe 15 years ago or so. Absolutely hilarious, since being from NE Ohio a couple of inches is a "break" sometimes.

Bill Powell
12-11-2008, 19:39
That was not "I can't believe it, Yea.' It was "I can't believe it, crap." All the body shop operators on the east side were looking up at the heavens and saying, "Thank you, God."

Bill Powell
12-12-2008, 19:25
One morning many years ago, in Miami, Arizona it had been summer for months. Hundred degree days, lots of them. Then, one morning in early May my dad got up to go to work and could not find his car. It, and the parking lot was under about a foot of snow. It took from seven til ten thirty to get to work, five miles away.

Bill Powell
12-13-2008, 20:19
One of the guys was talking earlier about his own slicky boy incident in Korea. When I first came to Houston I was working for an engineering company that had a contract with Michigan/Wisconsin Pipeline Company. This was about 1980 or a little earlier and the hot ticket for the American Slicky boys was the IBM Selectra typewriter and any desk top computer. Our offices were at the end of a long hall. Every day at five the janitorial people showed up to clean. They normally left the front door open til they were finished and then locked up. One of the janitors was cleaning the women's convenience when she saw a large pair of sneakers hangig down past the bottom of the stall wall. She screamed, he screamed, and he took off up that hall at a high rate of speed and stiff armed the door.

Remember I said they normally left the door unlocked. Well, this day she had locked it.

When he hit that aluminum door crossbar handle it ripped it out of the door on one side and it and his fist went through the tempered glass door glass.
The blood started as droplets at the door and grew in volume as he made his way toward the street. I guess he had a car cause the blood trail stopped at the curb.

Bill Powell
12-14-2008, 08:23
Anyone remember the Convair B-36? I saw the last one that ever flew. It flew in low, lower than normal, landed at Davis Monthan AFB, and was immediately cut up for scrap. Sad ending.

You used to be able to look way out in the desert from the edge of Tucson and see hundred of rudders from all kinds of aircraft. Now Davis Monthan is surrounded by sub-divisions.

My brother-in-law's brother was a crew member on a B-36 and his plane had an incident happen. I don't know how common this was, but I think once was enough.

Only the front section and the rear section of the plane was pressurized. There was an eighty foot tunnel with a little cart that ran the length of the bomb bay area that connect the pressurized areas. You would lie on the cart and pull yourself along with an over head line. The easisest way to do this was to pull yourself head first. One day a guy was pulling himself feet first when the rear section of the plane de-pressurized. The pressurized front half of the plane fired him through that tunnel like a blow gun, breaking both his legs when he cleared the tunnel.

paynter2
12-14-2008, 08:51
Yikes - I guess it's better to break your legs than your neck! I do remember the B-36. IIRC, at the time, there were only a handful of runways that could handle the weight of the beast.

I'm pouting today Bill. We're supposed to get close to 2 feet of snow before noon tomorrow. I got everything ready for a blast (with the snow we're supposed to get 30-40mph winds).

Yesterday I hooked up my brand new Western snowplow. It didn't work. There's pressure so the pump is working. But the blade only jerks to the right, only about an inch, and then comes back to the original position. I'm t thinking a valve is stuck someplace.

It's under warranty, but by the time I can take it to the dealer (tomorrow), we'll have the snow and drifts. Plus, I can't raise the plow. And, with the new design, there's no chain to shorten for highway travel. I think I'll have to get a tow. I'll let the dealer worry about it - he's got a tow truck.

Man, it really peeves you when something new, that you really rely on, doesn't work. Plus, the dealer isn't open Saturdays so Monday is the only day I can bring the plow in to him. And, since it's 30 miles to town, I have to get it fixed that day so I can drive home again.

I'm pretty much over the swearing stage - I had a beer last night and formulated Plan 'B'. I'll call the dealer in the morning and see what he says. If he can't work on it tomorrow, I'll take the plow off and barge through the snow with the truck. I have 4WD with a rear locker. I think I can make it out to the main road. Then, at least I can get to work.

It doesn't do much good to brood or stay pissed off. Somehow things always seem to work out. But, I am very disappointed in Western.

Bill Powell
12-14-2008, 10:14
Two of my least favorite things from a dealer or a store is, "Oh it was just a simple thing." Or, "Sure, we'd be happy to replace it for free."

Are they going to replace your lost hours trying to make that new part work, or your trips tow and from the store/dealer. When I used to work ass deep in snow determining a part was bad the last thing I wanted to hear was, "Oh, it's no big deal."

With the old cars most of the parts have to be mail ordered, and waiting and waiting only to find they'd typo'd a number and I get the wrong part.

paynter2
12-14-2008, 10:21
Yah - there are some horror stories out there. I'm hoping the dealer knows what the problem is and how to fix it. I doubt if he'll pay for the towing - at least willingly. A call to Western might help with that.

I'll ask Western if they want me to chain the plow to the light bar for the thirty mile trip. That and the fact that untold thousands of people (potential customers) are reading web sites now days - GT and a plow site that I frequent.

It will be interesting. I just like it when things work - that's why I buy new. I expect them to work. If they don't, I expect the dealer to bend over backwards to make them work. Who knows, maybe he will. I'll give him a chance tomorrow.i

Bill Powell
12-14-2008, 10:37
Luck with that. If they screw you around I'll come up and help you tickle them senseless.

Bill Powell
12-20-2008, 06:29
So, paynter2, what happened with the plow?

paynter2
12-20-2008, 06:44
So, paynter2, what happened with the plow?

The dealer returned my call (last Monday 12/15). He asked me if I could bring the plow in and leave it - then take my car to work. I told him my car was buried under 1.5 feet of snow and 100 feet from a plowed road. And, that I'm too old to shovel that much snow - "that's why I bought a plow". So, I left the plow in the garage and took my truck to the TC.

I called them yesterday to see if I can get the plow in this coming Monday - too busy!!! They can get to it (Monday) 12/29. I'm taking some vacation time that week so I can spend the entire day at the shop if necessary.

I'm past the being mad state. I just want the damned thing fixed. We've got 2 feet of snow on the ground and are expecting another 8+ inches this weekend. By the time they get the damned thing fixed there might be too much snow to plow with a truck.

My friends say I should go in this Monday and read him the riot act, but I sort of like the guy and I'll have to work with him in the future - when this episode is over. So, I'm trying to be patient. It isn't my style to get into someone's face.

I'm doing some electrical work today. Somehow an old jeep bumper fell against (and broke) an electrical box in my garage - it tripped the GF. I unplugged every cord/gadget in the garage and the GF will not reset. So, I'm going to replace the broken box - something must have shorted in it and is (probably) still shorted. I want to get my Christmas lights working again (the ones with the $200 bulbs - that's another story).

Edited to add forecast:

... WINTER STORM WARNING NOW IN EFFECT UNTIL 6 PM CST SUNDAY...

MODERATE TO HEAVY SNOW WILL SPREAD ACROSS ALL OF NORTHEAST MINNESOTA AND NORTHWEST WISCONSIN THIS MORNING AND CONTINUE THROUGH SUNDAY... MAKING TRAVEL VERY HAZARDOUS ACROSS THE ENTIRE REGION THIS WEEKEND. SNOWFALL TOTALS TODAY THROUGH SUNDAY ARE EXPECTED TO BE 8 TO 12 INCHES... WITH HIGHER AMOUNTS IN EXCESS OF 16 INCHES ACROSS THE HIGHER TERRAIN AREAS AROUND LAKE SUPERIOR.

SNOWFALL RATES WILL BECOME HEAVY AT TIMES... TO AROUND 2 INCHES PER HOUR... WITH VISIBILITIES REDUCED TO NEAR ZERO. IN ADDITION... GUSTY NORTHWEST WINDS WILL DEVELOP SUNDAY... RESULTING IN AREAS OF BLOWING SNOW WITH GREATLY REDUCED VISIBILITIES.

Bill Powell
12-20-2008, 18:12
Did I mention we had four inches of snow in Houston last week? '
That would be like 20 inches by yankee measure.

paynter2
12-21-2008, 06:19
Did I mention we had four inches of snow in Houston last week? '
That would be like 20 inches by yankee measure.

A woman I used to date fell for it every time! :supergrin:

Damned Bill - I'm trying to pout like a normal guy here and you're making jokes!

Actually, I think I'll be alright if we don't get any more major storms for a week. Looking out the window this morning (at my snowbound car) I think we got about 6 inches. I can easily drive through that. I packed the old snow a little with my truck - I know I can get the truck out. It's not easy to pack 2 feet of snow - it doesn't really pack. But, I can get to work again this week without having to hire someone to plow.

I replaced the electrical box - or at least the outlet guts. The GF will still not reset. I was going to replace the breaker. But, the breaker will reset - I think I fried the GF outlet itself.

I poked around the net and found that GF's weaken with time and use. The more it trips the weaker it gets until it won't stay on. So, if I can get to town today I'll try a new GF outlet. ZZZZZZT :shocked:

Bill Powell
12-21-2008, 07:48
People that have lived in the south always do not realize how lucky they are. He in Houston we have 24 hour hardware stores and electrical service, and no snow and ice to impede our passage to these stores.

That didn't sound right. I know the cities have the conveniences, but we don't have a wall of ice between us and them.

Bill Powell
12-21-2008, 19:36
I found an M1 Garand at an estate sale. The serial number is thre hundred and something thousand which makes it pre-war. It's not a totally numbers matching gun but I don't care cause the price was $200.00 dollars.

Bill Powell
12-24-2008, 06:17
Price turned out to be $123.00. It is a pre-war Springfield M1 Garand made in November of 1941. It is in generally good shape. I'd been looking for one for awhile and just stumbled across this one.

Bill Powell
12-24-2008, 19:38
Anyone ever have what you would consider a para-normal experience? I've had two that stand out in my mind.

One was in 1960, in Atlanta, Ga. I traveled from Ft. Bragg by thumb and got to Atlanta about six Sunday morning without a penny in my pocket. I was dropped off on a street that was line with closed stores as far as the eye could see. Suddenly I made a right turn into the one store that was open, I don't know why I knew that store would be open. In the store I made a right turn and went to the far wall, reached into the phone, pulled out a dime and called my aunt so she could rescue me. It was some time before I looked back and thought about the unlikelyhood of that happening in that sequence.


Years later in Tulsa, due to bad series of decisions on my part my family was having it rough. My sister in Houston had been after me to come to Houston and take advantage of the boom. One evening I was downtown and decided to call. I called long distance information for my sister's number. I dialed that number, and found out long distance information had given me the wrong number. When I called the number I got a neighbor of my sister's, a neighbor she had not visited in over a year, and my sister was sitting in her neighbor's kitchen when I called. I packed up my kit and came to Houston.

Somtimes coincidence just has a tough time covering it.............

Bill Powell
12-25-2008, 10:54
It's Christmas morning and I made out like a bandit; a couple of custom knives from my sons, a custom knife from my wife, three books on antique guns, a book on the history of folding knives, and a guitar (a biginning guitar course called GUITAR FOR DUMMIES) Also an M1 GArand which is sort of Christmas like.

More importantly the family is together and safe.

paynter2
12-25-2008, 11:00
Merry Christmas Bill! Glad all is well.

-22F this morning. Sun is out and it's up to +3 already. I've been shoveling - trying to get my car out of two feet of snow. I'm almost there.

The short in my garage electrics was an adapter plug on the block heater of my car (was plugged into a garage outlet). The car heater's plug hangs down in the front and gets full of salt and crap. So, I slip an adapter on it as a replaceable device. I guess it was time to replace it. Glad it wasn't the block heater.

I was happy to get home, late last night, from the TC and see my Christmas lights burning. I think of ALGORE every time I see them - kinda warms my heart.

Bill Powell
12-25-2008, 11:14
Merry Christmas. I stood an outside four hour guard duty one time in 26 below weather onetime. If we had been attacked I could not have responded cause I had on every piece of winter gear the army issued. I looked like a green Pillsbury dough boy.

I'm glad your electrical was something fixable. I don't know what I would do if I couldn't irritate the Al Gore worshippers.

Bill Powell
12-26-2008, 18:54
I found a hat at a show that fits me, and it has a simple message across the front. All it says is 'infidel'. People look at it like they think it is trying to pass on some secret message. It's really a fun hat.

rhikdavis
12-26-2008, 18:58
Is it written in arabic?

Bill Powell
12-27-2008, 06:17
Actually it is. The bottom line is. The top line is in English or I wouldn't have a clue what it says. It's sold by a company called <sogarmory.com>. They do T-shirts, too.

Bill Powell
12-27-2008, 07:44
We found the burial site for surplus issue items in the Munsan-ni area. It was under one of our guard towers, and not hidden very well. We found it when a guy I was with stubbed his toe on a bone machete handle grip that was sticking up out of the dirt. It hadn't been underground long enough to be rusty, nor had the fifteen or twenty others we found. All ou guys had machetes in their trucks, for any Godless heathern we may run across. In that same pit were new Proto and S-K tool sets, so all our drivers had better tool kits than the class II mechanics in the shop. There were repair parts for all our issue weapons, so I stocked up on M2 carbine parts which I shipped home. There was a customs safe way to do that. It was called Hold Baggage. If it was signed off by the motor officer it was assumed he had personally inspected it and approved of the contents. When you have a memeograph machine and a typewriter you can create travel orders, and when you have access to the motor officer's rubber signature stamp you have proof that he inspected it and okayed it. It worked then. Probably would not today.

Bill Powell
12-28-2008, 08:21
One day I decided to get my hair styled. It was getting long and either a hair cut was called for, or some way to keep the hair up and out of sight and out of mind. I went down to the local styling salon in Munsan-ni and told the girl what I wanted. (Remember how Ceasar Romero's used to flow straight back in waves?) About an hour later I walked out of there with cool loking hair, and head sores and burn scars.

After about a month the waves were still there, but they were hanging down over my ears and looking real noticeable. So, I went back to that same salon and contracted another style job and hair cut.

Big problem. This time I was sober and she was drunk. I found out where all those head sores came from from the last time. Here curling iron was red hot, and I couldn't stand an hour of that kind of pain so I just opted for the hair cut.

You could get a shampoo, hair cut, shave (with a straight razor, your beard, your upper cheeks, your forehead, your eyelids, and razor neck trim) for ninety eight cents.

I still have a big scar behind my right ear from where I was getting a razor trim from a Korean barber. He had just laid the straight razor to the side of my neck when a sneeze snuck up on him He was very apologetic.............

Bill Powell
12-28-2008, 17:44
Bought a knife at the gun show. Most people won't like it, but it's the kind thing that really turns me on. Made by some old local man, made from a Nicholson industrial file 1/4 inch thick, inch and a half wide and about fourteen inches long. There is a simple bone scale for the grips. What I really like is that he left the file texture in the surface.

eisman
12-28-2008, 18:11
Bill-

There's a guy here in B'ham that makes knives like that. He's at all the shows. I get a kick out of trying to guess the files by brand. (It kind of bugs me, as good files can be resharpened, and I always have a drawer full of files.) I just wish that the guy would take a little more time and use some artistic design. It would help the looks to move from okay to pretty good. He has the skill, just no marketing sense.

What did you get for Christmas? I got a nice Russ Eisler and a ivory handled drop point from Don Lozier. Russ passed away about a month before Christmas; his buddy Ron Gaston went just this summer. They made really nice knives; on their own and together. I always liked Rons blades, and Russ was a shade better on the handles.

Your mention of the B-36 brought back memories. My dad transitioned to them after returning Stateside. He was in B-24's out of England and it took a couple years after everything died down for him to get the points.

Bill Powell
12-28-2008, 19:13
That kind of sucks, having to earn points in peace time. I wish I'd photographed the other side, right in front of the grip is a bare spot in the file texture with "Nicholson USA and made in usa stamped into the blade. My son gave me a couple of Dan Schevers knives, a bowie and a skinner, both in schevers custom sheaths. One is scrimshawed and one is not. Plus, Eric held back one of the Glock Talk knives for me.

I bought some micarta grips for my 1911. I'm going to scrimshaw faux checkering around the screws, and a Marine Devil Dog in the center. I'll take photos. I used to scrimshaw quite a few knives. Being in Texas I got sick of doing armadillos.

MOHAA Player
12-28-2008, 20:36
Slicky Boys 0
Bill Powell 1

Bill Powell
12-30-2008, 06:05
I can honestly say I did pretty good with the slicky boys. They did not like the way I did guard duty, cause I did not walk my post in a military manner. I would move into the shadows and they didn't know where I was going to pop out, and that made them nervous. With all the other guards they knew exactly how long they had in a given spot before the guard showed up again.

Rager
12-30-2008, 08:10
Bought a knife at the gun show. Most people won't like it, but it's the kind thing that really turns me on. Made by some old local man, made from a Nicholson industrial file 1/4 inch thick, inch and a half wide and about fourteen inches long. There is a simple bone scale for the grips. What I really like is that he left the file texture in the surface.Mmm.

Do files still have a core of softer metal to them Bill?

I like the metal protruding handle, but would care for a little bit more wood, and perhaps a guard/ stop. -whatever it should be called.

Bill Powell
12-30-2008, 18:48
I have a friend who has a metal testing lab. They do mostly weld testing, and hardness of heat treated areas. He's going to do a Rockwell test about 1/2 inch in from the edge full length of the blade. If there are any soft spots he will remove the scales and heat treat the entire blade. I doubt if there was any magic involved doing the blade as it was built by an old retired guy from a supply of industrial files he scored somewhere.

paynter2
12-30-2008, 18:57
I used to work with a guy on our power line construction crew. He was an 'oiler' on the equipment. He spent quite a bit of time at the company shop. It was a big, regional, power company.

He made a few knives for me out of power hack-saw blades. Nothing fancy - a blade and two pieces of wood riveted together. They were very fine knives.

The filet knife was too stiff for the fish I caught - maybe would have worked good on bigger species. The hunting knife was really good - very strong. The boning knife worked good too - but I couldn't tell much difference between it and a commercial tool.

How does the steel in the power hack-saw blade compare to file steel? It seems that file steel would be brittle.

Bill Powell
12-30-2008, 19:28
I'll find out tomorrow. I just got it cause I like the way it looks. If the edge of the blade turns out to be too soft I'll have him heat treat the edge.

Bill Powell
12-31-2008, 18:30
It's harder than the gates of hell, especially up by the dagger tip. I'm going to leave it just like it is, and buy a cheap big knife with a nice looking sheath.

Bill Powell
01-01-2009, 11:06
Well, the Christmas cheer has come and gone, and this morning I feel much older because of this brand new year.

Christmas was a pleasant time for us. We did nothing but enjoy the moment, and I did the twelve days of Christmas for my wife. It's hard coming up with a new gift every day, twelve daays in a row. It's also expensive. Anyway, it's over and I'm a hero in the eyes of the ladies in her golf league.

Bill Powell
01-03-2009, 08:35
When I lived and worked in Battle Mt., Nev. there was the constant search for lost rifles, a story almost persistent as the Lost Dutchman legend in Ariz. According to the story the local military outpost was equipped with obsolete rifles, probably the fifty eight caliber Springfield. When they were equipped the .45-70 replacements they took all the old Springfields and all the support equipment for them, and took them to undisclosed location about a day's wagon ride from the outpost and buried them.

Well, just north of Battle Mt is the Humbolt River, can't go that way. West of town are mountains and I can't see them driving heavily loaded wagons there, so that leaves south and east of the area. For those of you who have driven across northern Nevada that flat, high desert looking country is water-logged, part of the old Lake Bonneville lake bed. The reason there's no vegetation to speak of is alkalai, not lack of water.

KWhere ever they were buried there may be a few scraps of wood and some lead shot, and not much else, so I figure they'll find those rifles and the Lost Dutchman on the same day.

paynter2
01-03-2009, 08:47
Good morning Bill. I'm getting ready for another winter blast. A new foot of snow, high winds and then back into the deep freeze (-25) tomorrow night. I've got lots of beer and food so I'm ready...

Here's some knife sheaths for you to look at.

http://www.eknifeworks.com/webapp/eCommerce/prodlist.jsp?Mode=Text&SearchText=sheath&Search.x=12&Search.y=12&Search=1

Bill Powell
01-03-2009, 09:01
GOOOODDDD MOOORRRNNIIINNNNGGGGG Glock Talk Pipples. How you doing mister paynter man? There was a fantasy dagger on about page fifteen with a sheath that would work.

I can't even imagine being that cold. When I start trying to imagine it I get down close to freezing and divert my imaginary thoughts to warmer places. You ever read The Cremation Of Billy McGee in school? I'm Billy.

Rager
01-04-2009, 06:38
I used to work with a guy on our power line construction crew. He was an 'oiler' on the equipment. He spent quite a bit of time at the company shop. It was a big, regional, power company.

He made a few knives for me out of power hack-saw blades. Nothing fancy - a blade and two pieces of wood riveted together. They were very fine knives.

The filet knife was too stiff for the fish I caught - maybe would have worked good on bigger species. The hunting knife was really good - very strong. The boning knife worked good too - but I couldn't tell much difference between it and a commercial tool.

How does the steel in the power hack-saw blade compare to file steel? It seems that file steel would be brittle.I have a book on building knives somewhere in my apt. Simple and straightforward, one of the projects details using power hacksaw pieces to build a knife. It also has a -or else another one I have- has simple details for setting temper on it.

One is Custom Tools for Woodworkers -- Petrovich -- Stackpole Books , good writeup on temper.

Bill Powell
01-04-2009, 06:59
Actually, paynter2, what parallel line are you close to? I was right at the 38th parallel and the climate should be similar to what you have. One of the nice parts about winter was that you could not smell the rice paddies. You do remember that honey bucket I spoke of earlier? Well, when that mixture is properly mellowed it is used to fertilize the paddies.

Thing that amazed me in that ten or fifteen degree weather was kids running aroung in T-shirt and shorts and rubber shoes. It didn't seem to faze them. I think it is because the average body temp of a Korean was a couple of degrees warmer that ours.

paynter2
01-04-2009, 09:58
9210'52"W, 4715'53"N

Nowhere near as far north as Korea. But, we get the brutal cold from northern Canada - it shoots right down over us.

It's 10AM and still only 3F with 10-20mph winds. Supposed to get to -26 tonight with those same 10-20mph winds. But, we build our houses to handle it. Actually, it's fairly cheap to heat my house. I use off-peak electric - half price. I also have an LP heater in the basement that can heat the house if necessary - backup as it were.

Just like those Korean rug rats. If we get a 35-40 degree day (this time of year) I'd probably be out in a tee shirt too. If fact, I put almost exactly 20K miles per year on my car. I change oil every three months - 2-5-8-11. That way, I miss DEC and JAN and change oil late in FEB. It can still be brutal in FEB, but it can be nice too. I'll wait for a 35-40 degree day and change the oil in my bibs and a tee. Just call me Kim... :shocked:

It's just where we live. I'm going out to shovel my car out and drive to the dump (transfer station) today. I'll spend some time cleaning the garage and probably go for a walk. The cloths we have today prevent most weather from stopping us. The only time I remember turning back from a walk was -39 wind chill (probably -70 by the old calculation). I was dressed warm enough except for my nose.

MacG22
01-04-2009, 12:05
That is a great story.

Bill Powell
01-04-2009, 14:08
No, I'll call you Pak-San. It'll set you apart from the crowd. Half the people I knew there were named Kim. You know, seriously, I functioned in the cold weather, and you do get accustomed to it up to a point. My brother moved from Arizona to Alaska, on purpose.

A friend of mine was stationed in Fairbanks, north of Fairbanks a little, actually, and his first Sgt. wanted to court martial hi cause he would not walk to a training class in a light field jacket. It was 72 below zero. The company commander would not let the first sgt pursue the court martial when he heard the circumstances.

I did used to feel sorry for the tank crews that broke a track in one of those frozen creeks or rivers. Where you break a track is where you change it.

I mentioned this years ago, concerning those honey buckets. The Koreans used to think that our indoor toilets with septic tanks full of chemicals was a terrible waste of good waste.

paynter2
01-04-2009, 14:25
Man I just got back in the house. We got more snow than I realized. I was just gonna shovel the car out and load up the garbage. But, walking to the garage proved deeper snow than I expected.

So, I had to plow - at least it's nice and warm in the truck. Then, I went to the dump and had a couple of beers when I got home.

Then, a friend/neighbor called. He went to Arkansas just after Christmas to visit his parents. He called to 'hint' that I should go shovel the walk for his girlfriend - "go help her out" are his exact words. I told him I'd be "happy to help her out!".

It took me about 40 minutes to shovel her out - the wind was howling across the lake. I see the wind chill is still -20 right now. When I was done she gave me a hug and said "you didn't have to do that". I told her I did it because "you're beautiful and have big boobs". Fact - scout's honor.

Now I have to ask you: Was that wrong? Pak-San

Bill Powell
01-04-2009, 14:52
Sounds to me like you have a little better than average powers of observation, and proved it by pointing out the obvious. No, I don't think that was wrong at all.

Asha'man
01-04-2009, 16:26
I told her I did it because "you're beautiful and have big boobs". Fact - scout's honor.

:needspics:

paynter2
01-05-2009, 06:27
Zzzz... I have to go back to the city today. I came home Christmas eve and have had a good vacation. Going back to reality is difficult - it doesn't take me long to turn into a bum.

The National Weather Service has been all over the map. first they said it would be -26 this morning. Then, -16, then, when I went to bed, the said -15. I got up and it's -26. Go figure. I swear, in my next life I'm coming back as a weather man. Give it a good guess, if you're wrong, just give a guess for tomorrow - never look back. What a job!!! It will probably drop a few degrees more before turning up.

I got a new truck last summer. After plowing I tried to get it out of 4W-LO. It wouldn't go to 4W-HI. That happened once before. I though - how in hell am I gonna drive the damned thing 200 miles to the dealer in 4W LO? Then, I had a 'light bulb' moment - read the owner's manual! "Put truck in neutral, put foot on brake, turn knob to 4W-HI". Even a monkey could understand it - makes me feel competent(?). :whistling:

Pak-San

Temp update: -29 at 8:30 AM

rhikdavis
01-05-2009, 06:50
Then, I had a 'light bulb' moment - read the owner's manual! "Put truck in neutral, put foot on brake, turn knob to 4W-HI". Even a monkey could understand it - makes me feel competent(?). :whistling:

Pak-San

Reckon how much the dealer would have charged you to divulge such cryptic information...

paynter2
01-05-2009, 06:59
Reckon how much the dealer would have charged you to divulge such cryptic information...

Yep - reminds me of the time the check engine light of my Corolla came on . I took it to the dealer and they said I needed a new gas cap - $130! Actually, it was just loose.

I understand how they have to charge something to stay open. But that seemed a little out of line. I since bought a diagnostic tool.

Later, I had a tire problem researched by that same dealership. It turns out one tire was flat spotted - the result of meeting a car going the wrong way on the freeway. I was passing a semi at night and met the moron!!! That's another story.

Anyway, the dealer said: "we sell tires". I told them I knew that they sold tires. But, after charging me $130 for a loose gas cap, I wasn't going to reward them with the purchase of a set of tires.

LAWDOGKMS
01-05-2009, 07:22
Anyone ever have anything explode right in your face?

Many years ago when I was doing NDT inspection work, I was mixing an Acid-Spot-Test bottle.

The chemicals were Ammonium Peroxy-Disulfate and Hydrochloric Acid...and were to be combined together for the acid spot test.

I was following all the acid-safety procedures, rubber coat, rubber apron, rubber gloves, goggles, hood etc..

This particular mix was the last one for the day, and the instructions said to cap the bottle, agitate it slightly to help mix, and set it aside to cool (the chemical reaction of the two, created heat).

So, that's what I did, and since I was done for the day, took my safety gear off.

I had walked back over the the vent hood where the acid bottles were, after filling out a label to put on one of the bottles, and about the time I reached for one of the bottles, the Ammonia/Hydrochloric mix exploded in my face..and instantly blinded me..

I "flew" across the room to the eyewash station, and buried my eyes and face in it while screaming for help.

Long story short, the acid burned my corneas or retinas (can't remember which), bad enough that I had to have medicine packed in my eyes and they were bandaged shut for 4 days.

I can say that it really sucks losing a "sense"...

I remember the nurses having to feed me, and I didn't believe them when they told me I was eating a particular food, because without sight it just didn't taste the same...

Bill Powell
01-05-2009, 19:11
Isn't it amazing how short a period of time can alter your future. It's really bad when you follow all the correct procedures and it turns out that just wasn't your day.

At the last copper mine I worked at, by Battle Mt. Nevada, I flash burned my eyes a couple of times to the point I literally could not see. My pardner and I were welding skids on a couple of cable sleds. There was about a foot of snow and we were welding with our backs to each other and never noticed the glace cause it was a reflection through the back of my hood.

One day we were servicing a D-9 Cat, and I had just put a new battery in the pony motor. We got our batteries driy so you had to fill them with acid. I was all finished and sat the box of electrolyte down, letting one corner drop about two inches. When that thing hit the ground the one drop of electrolyte that was in the end of the hose snapped up and hit me right in the eye. The first aid crap was a little tough to find, and one of the equipment operators wanted to piss in my eye to flush the acid out. He was some disappointed when the eye flush showed up before they let him piss in my eye. That actually does work in an emergency, but he wanted to do it way too much for my taste.

The most pain was when I got too close to a wall of molten falling rock and it dried all the moisture out of my eyes.

LAWDOGKMS
01-05-2009, 21:27
Isn't it amazing how short a period of time can alter your future. It's really bad when you follow all the correct procedures and it turns out that just wasn't your day.

At the last copper mine I worked at, by Battle Mt. Nevada, I flash burned my eyes a couple of times to the point I literally could not see. My pardner and I were welding skids on a couple of cable sleds. There was about a foot of snow and we were welding with our backs to each other and never noticed the glace cause it was a reflection through the back of my hood.

One day we were servicing a D-9 Cat, and I had just put a new battery in the pony motor. We got our batteries driy so you had to fill them with acid. I was all finished and sat the box of electrolyte down, letting one corner drop about two inches. When that thing hit the ground the one drop of electrolyte that was in the end of the hose snapped up and hit me right in the eye. The first aid crap was a little tough to find, and one of the equipment operators wanted to piss in my eye to flush the acid out. He was some disappointed when the eye flush showed up before they let him piss in my eye. That actually does work in an emergency, but he wanted to do it way too much for my taste.

The most pain was when I got too close to a wall of molten falling rock and it dried all the moisture out of my eyes.

Brings back memories of the terrible flash burns I had in the Tig-Booth under perfectly controlled conditions...the table I was welding over was too reflective and reflected the arc under my visor...

Or, the red hot "nickel sized" drop of molten aluminum that dripped from the structure I was carbon-arcing, fell into my boot and lodged/melted into the top of my foot about a 1/2-3/4" deep.. The only good thing about the wound was that it was completely cauterized instantly, but I still have a pretty deep hole on the top of my right foot..

Or...the several times I had piece of metal from grinding that went into the meat of my eye and had to be fished out by a doctor, with a hypodermic syringe, while I tried not to move while he was sticking that needle into my eyeball..

Thinking back, I'm actually lucky I can see now with all the incidents I've had with my eyes..

Maybe that's why I wear safety glasses doing EVERYTHING now, even trimming my hedges, you never know when you're going to bend down to pick up a branch, and that stick you didn't see so well because it was angled right at your eye, goes through your eyeball...

Would be the end of my current career...

Rager
01-06-2009, 05:24
Brings back memories of the terrible flash burns I had in the Tig-Booth under perfectly controlled conditions...the table I was welding over was too reflective and reflected the arc under my visor...

Or, the red hot "nickel sized" drop of molten aluminum that dripped from the structure I was carbon-arcing, fell into my boot and lodged/melted into the top of my foot about a 1/2-3/4" deep.. The only good thing about the wound was that it was completely cauterized instantly, but I still have a pretty deep hole on the top of my right foot..

Or...the several times I had piece of metal from grinding that went into the meat of my eye and had to be fished out by a doctor, with a hypodermic syringe, while I tried not to move while he was sticking that needle into my eyeball..

Thinking back, I'm actually lucky I can see now with all the incidents I've had with my eyes..

Maybe that's why I wear safety glasses doing EVERYTHING now, even trimming my hedges, you never know when you're going to bend down to pick up a branch, and that stick you didn't see so well because it was angled right at your eye, goes through your eyeball...

Would be the end of my current career...Geez LawDog... I pay attention to my eyes as well. I'm sure I've had some scares but nothing -real- bad. I worked with a fellow who, in his mid 30s, was diagnosed with diabetes.

He was thin to begin with so it was a permanent one, as opposed to weight related. He woke up one morning and couldn't see worth a damn. Scared the hell outta him.

AFA welding, I've done a little bit. I will always carry a swiss-army knife with a tweezers in them. Damn zingers drive me nuts. Heh heh 2 of us spent a good week welding OSHA railing for a customer once. Outside. It snowed heavy wet snow for the entire week. Weld 15 minutes, go inside. Bent over something, with my chest resting on some steel and stuck an arc, and tickled my heart a few times.

Bill Powell
01-06-2009, 06:05
Back to the last copper mine I where I worked as a mechanic/welder. I worked on the shovel repair crew. kWe had some old Bucyrus-Erie loading shovels, ranging from from five and a half cubic yards to seven and a half cubic yards. We lined the rear corners and leading edges of the buckets with worn out Caterpillar blade edges. We welded them on with Stainless, not for strength but wearability. The result was, when it came time to change them the worn out plates we had to cut them off with a carbon arc. Inside that little bucket, which is shined like a new truck bumper, You cannot get away from the light refection, or the falling molten steel.

You guard the eyes,but the one I really hate is the little molten dill-berry that goes in the ear and start swimming around in the ear wax, working its way toward the ear drum.

Bill Powell
01-11-2009, 15:18
One of the worst flash burns I ever got had nothing to do with the eyes. I was wellding re-bar for concrete columns. The bundle of re-bar was about eight inches square, and I tucked it under my arm to feed it ot the next weld. I wasn't wearing a chin flap on the welding hood, and I was wearing a T-shirt. Under my chin, my throat, the bottoms of my ears, my arm pit and upper arms looked like they had been attacked with a flame thrower.

xsiv4s
01-11-2009, 15:59
Now bill, this would be a good time to come clean. Is that really the worst welding burns or flash burns you ever got? I seem to remember a little volkswagon incident in Houston that left some lasting marks.:rofl:

Bill Powell
01-11-2009, 16:36
Okay, worst burns that can be shown in public without being arrested; or at the least, ridiculed.

When's Orlando?

Bill Powell
01-11-2009, 16:49
Besides, that VolksWagen was foreign, and out to get me.

xsiv4s
01-11-2009, 16:51
Okay, worst burns that can be shown in public without being arrested; or at the least, ridiculed.

When's Orlando?


Orlando is Thursday-Sunday.

Butt it's such a good story.:rofl:

Bill Powell
01-11-2009, 17:10
Eric had such a flair with that story. His job to re-tell it.

Bill Powell
01-12-2009, 19:59
In our mess hall in Korea we used all Korean kitchen help except for the cooks and bakers. The shelf and window where you dumped your trays after your meal almost caused an international incident. Well, not really, but the Koreans thought the GI's were crazy as loons.

The GI's could not stand to see the Koreans squatted around the dump tray picking out all the good cuts of meat and other tossed foods. They finally built an opaque window that covered the kitchen area except for a very thin slit that allowed the tray to slide through. They built a second dump for the cups and glasses and a chute for the silverware. That solution got expensive.

paynter2
01-14-2009, 23:18
Bill: I found the story about the Bentley... Some night you'll wake up in a cold sweat and realize that the is a God.

Years ago, when I was a kid working on construction, a dump truck caught on fire. It was an old International gas tandem. There was no air cleaner on it and somehow it backfired through the carb and was burning.

I opened the hood, saw the fire and turned around to find something to smother it with. The young guy behind me had two handfuls of sand to put the fire out with. THE TRUCK WAS STILL RUNNING!!!

I found an old oil rag and held it over the carb to smother the fire.

Man - I have to see what that Bud Moore Boss 302 goes for. I know it's not a street car, but it sounds so good. I'd just like to have it to go to sleep by... I have never settled my own mind on what sounds best - a small block all wound out or a big block in full song. I guess it's not a fair comparison - they both sound great.

Not as cold as I thought it would be when I got home tonight. I think it's about -16. But, I think it will be -30 by morning. If you could see how bad my car looks - it's literally caked with salt. But, it's too damned cold to wash it.

Rager
01-14-2009, 23:37
Sounds of beauty I've heard years ago, include a Navy piston powered, radial that made two passes at the Cleveland Air Show.

One at safe lowest speed, with some small valve overlap barking and coughing going on. And a second, again :at full song:. Mmmm

CatsMeow
01-15-2009, 00:21
Sounds of beauty I've heard years ago, include a Navy piston powered, radial that made two passes at the Cleveland Air Show.

One at safe lowest speed, with some small valve overlap barking and coughing going on. And a second, again :at full song:. Mmmm

Youtube is your friend... That's where I get my warbird sound fix (and also Detroit Diesel, automatic weapon, etc.).

But nothing like a formation of three T-28D Trojans passing over our school when I was a kid.:cool:

Rager
01-15-2009, 00:54
(and also Detroit Diesel...OMG, that's desperate!

Though, for a while, I was a yard ape at a construction concern. Jockeyed and steamed some IH 4X4 dumps. V16s. I think redline is 1250 rpm. Heh heh

CatsMeow
01-15-2009, 01:51
There's something about the sound of a Detroit two-stroke that's fascinating to me. Started when I was a kid, there was this genset on wheels with GM on the radiator, used for welding in a shop. My young mind was wondering why it didn't go chug-chug but rrrrrr when it had only two cylinders, and had this big thingy on the side instead of an intake manifold:supergrin:. Only when I was grown did I realize it was a 2-71.

And when I was already a lawyer, the street outside our office was being worked on, and there was this Wabco grader (ex-USMC) with a 4-71. Needless to say, I was all eyes and ears.:rofl:

Rager
01-15-2009, 02:56
There's something about the sound of a Detroit two-stroke that's fascinating to me. Started when I was a kid, there was this genset on wheels with GM on the radiator, used for welding in a shop. My young mind was wondering why it didn't go chug-chug but rrrrrr when it had only two cylinders, and had this big thingy on the side instead of an intake manifold:supergrin:. Only when I was grown did I realize it was a 2-71.

And when I was already a lawyer, the street outside our office was being worked on, and there was this Wabco grader (ex-USMC) with a 4-71. Needless to say, I was all eyes and ears.:rofl:A friend of mine was all sore a few years ago. He's got a 3-53 or 4-53 powered backhoe. I can't remember the brand, well-known on the East Coast. It's a tank. Edit: DynaHoe

Anyway the frigging thing never had a decent muffler on it. I could hear him easily from a mile away.

He moved and his neighbors sorta 'convinced' him to hang a proper muffler on it. Reminded me of the 4 engine prop ?Constellations that used to drone across the summer sky in Pa.

Longhammer
01-15-2009, 03:30
Bill, I enjoy the stories. Did You work for Dennis Washington? Anaconda Copper mine? I used to work at a place he aquirred out in Tacoma.
That burn story reminded me of when I used an air-arc all day, without neck protection, while working on an auto-rack. I blistered my throat (2nd degree) The skin just cracked and slipped off. I am sure yours was worse. You know what they say about playing with fire. Thanks for the memories.

CatsMeow
01-15-2009, 19:58
While we're on the subject of welding, in high school shop class, we were taught welding basics, and one oft-mentioned warning from the shop teacher was always stay upwind from the welding smoke. At first I didn't listen, that night my eyes felt like they had gravel in them...:shocked:

Bill Powell
01-15-2009, 20:26
I never knew Mr. Washington. I worked for Duval Corp, and Inspiration Consolidated in Miami, Ariz. The skin did not flake off of me. It was more like a painful, really painful sunburn.

In my hometown, Miami, Az. was Cecil Trucking Company. They had long nosed GMC tractors with a 6-71 Detroit engine runing through 3-1/2 vertical stack with no muffler. They ran a 16 speed Spicer with two speed axle. God, that was a beautiful sound when those trucks came down those mountain passes.

I have a friend who has all the best known war-birds on CD's. he palys them on the road in lieu of music or books on tape. Go to Google and type in Moto-Guzzi V-8, and see the four cam V-8 motorcycle engine, and listen to the sound track.

BRM and Vanwall built a couple of F-1 engines back in the fifties. Vanwall used a V type engine and BRM used a Boxer layout. They were 1500 cc's and sixteen cylinders, with four valves per cylinder. I heard the Vanwall run, and it was a real treat just to listen to it.

Someone mentioned the Connie with the tri-rudder. I flew from TravisAFB, north of San Francisco to Yokohama, 36 hours in the air. I used to like the sing-song of the B-36.

Eric
01-15-2009, 20:51
Eric had such a flair with that story. His job to re-tell it.

Years ago, Bill had a VW Squareback in his shop. He was giving the car suicide doors, among other things. The car was stripped down to a bare steel shell and he was working inside the car, doing some cutting and welding. He had just been using the torch and some seam sealer or something had began to smoke, so Bill had hosed down the inside of the car and it was all well-soaked. Bill had also been doing some welding, so the stinger of his arc welder was laying in the passenger-side floor board, on that wet steel.

So, we have an empty bare shell, an empty wet bare shell, of a VW, an Arc welder and Bill's ass. Here's what happened: Bill sat down on that bare, wet, steel floorboard, directly on that live stinger for his arc welder. His weight pushed the welding rod into contact with the metal floor, where it found a willing ground and begin to do its thing. I don't think Bill was getting shocked at this point, as the most direct path to ground for the juice was directly into the floorboards, but the arc created was pretty hot and it rapidly burrned a hole through his drawers and began to work on his ass. At this point, he realized that getting out of that car would be a good thing, but he was sitting down really low and needed to grab something to pull himself up and out. the problem was that everything he touched was more car and gave the juice in that stinger a new path to ground. In short, everything he touched shocked him.

I saw a funny cats video on YouTube.com a few months ago and one of the clips in the video was of a kitten that ill-advisedly tried to walk over a cactus. By the time the kitten felt the sharp, it had already put its weight on the forward foot and the only way to get it off the cactus was to bring the other foot into contact with the cactus, which brought the other foot into contact with the cactus, and so forth. That poor kitten must have slapped that cactus fifteen or twenty times with each foot, before it over-centered and fell off the ledge. Well, Bill trying to get out of that car looked a lot like that poor kitten. His hands flapped off of every surface within reach, in rapid succession, before he was able to shift his weight enough to clear contact with the that stinger.

It was all over with in much less time than it has taken you to read this and when it was done, there was Bill, with a smoking hole in his pants, a scowl on his face and his two middle sons laughing their asses off at him. Now Bill has got a very well-developed sense of humor, but it took him a good thirty minutes to work himself around to seeing the humor that my brother and I saw in that spectacle. It was quite a site.:rofl:Eric

Rager
01-16-2009, 00:42
I never knew Mr. Washington. I worked for Duval Corp, and Inspiration Consolidated in Miami, Ariz. The skin did not flake off of me. It was more like a painful, really painful sunburn.

In my hometown, Miami, Az. was Cecil Trucking Company. They had long nosed GMC tractors with a 6-71 Detroit engine runing through 3-1/2 vertical stack with no muffler. They ran a 16 speed Spicer with two speed axle. God, that was a beautiful sound when those trucks came down those mountain passes.

I have a friend who has all the best known war-birds on CD's. he palys them on the road in lieu of music or books on tape. Go to Google and type in Moto-Guzzi V-8, and see the four cam V-8 motorcycle engine, and listen to the sound track.

BRM and Vanwall built a couple of F-1 engines back in the fifties. Vanwall used a V type engine and BRM used a Boxer layout. They were 1500 cc's and sixteen cylinders, with four valves per cylinder. I heard the Vanwall run, and it was a real treat just to listen to it.

Someone mentioned the Connie with the tri-rudder. I flew from TravisAFB, north of San Francisco to Yokohama, 36 hours in the air. I used to like the sing-song of the B-36.
Somewhere online there is a recording of the BRM running alone on, perhaps, an oval. I think I have a copy, but it's on another machine. About 2 minutes long.

I know that the technical stuff concerning that engine, and the time frame it was built it makes it "something else". Oh, I just noticed 1500 CCs, in the Fifties! IOW complicated as hell.

Rager
01-16-2009, 00:44
Years ago, Bill had a VW Squareback in his shop.
Oh my. That's great!

Eric
01-16-2009, 10:01
Oh my. That's great!

:headscratch:...........

Eric
01-16-2009, 10:04
Oh my. That's great!


VW Squareback:


http://glocktalk.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=164839&stc=1&d=1232122267

Bill Powell
01-17-2009, 08:47
I don't know why car have to be so over-complicated today. That little square back in the picture will seat four comfortably, can get over 30mpg, will do almost 100MPH, had disc brakes later, and the tools to maintain it could be carried in you pocket.

That car, with a simple fuel injection system and a fuel mamagement computer, would be just about perfect.

Did I mention the doors were tall enought to get in and out of the car without being a contortionist?

Bill Powell
01-17-2009, 09:00
Paynter 2, I don't know if that Mustang will sell, especially for the price they want, but I do know this. These auctins in Phoenix will set the mood for the rest of the year.

That Bugatti at the RM sale yesterday bid up to about four and quarter million dollars and was turned down. The Corvette Grand Sport bid up to five million dollars, the reserve was lifted, and it sold. Then the guy pulled it, decided he did not want to sell it. A lot of bidders were pissed. They got up and left. An incident like that can affect RM's future.

I was in Tulsa one day and met a lady at an intersection who had a carburetor on fire. Being a hero at heart I jumped out to save the day. All I could find in my car was a Pampers diaper. I cupped that down over the carb and snuffed the fire. In doing so my Pampers melted and flowed down into the carburetor. I said, "Bye, good luck."

I've driven those old Internationals all over the world, gas and diesel, and they're a pretty good truck.

Did you know that when Diesel built the diesel engine it was designed to run on peanut oil so the German farmers could have a constant fuel supply? Diesel fuel as we know it came later.

Bill Powell
01-17-2009, 09:04
Eric, see if your computer can fill in the rear side windows on that VW and chop the top about four inches and you'll see what that VW wound up looking like. The convertible with the Carson top got finished later, too.

VANWALL
01-17-2009, 17:43
Bill,

To the best of my knowledge F1 Vanwall cars had 4 cyl engines.

There are road worthy Vanwall made with a V12 engine.

http://www.vanwallcars.com/html/historic_motorsport_internatio.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vanwall

Rager
01-17-2009, 18:58
:headscratch:...........
Well the story and the fact that someone would re-do a bloody VW of that type. I've never worked on them, but I was under the impression their computer boxes were not the "peak" of German engineering.

Bill Powell
01-18-2009, 00:56
I have a firm memory of this car, made about the same time that BRM H16 engine was made. I'll have to go into our paper library for it. It never competed cause it was even more complicated that that BRM V16. It had the high back Vanwall body with the exhaust pipes visible coming out the bottom of the sheetmetal.

On that VW I said if it had a computer. It didn't when built.

Rager
01-18-2009, 04:52
I have a firm memory of this car, made about the same time that BRM H16 engine was made. I'll have to go into our paper library for it. It never competed cause it was even more complicated that that BRM V16. It had the high back Vanwall body with the exhaust pipes visible coming out the bottom of the sheetmetal.

On that VW I said if it had a computer. It didn't when built.The TYPE Is and IIs and IIIs models did, correct?

That's what I'm confusing your model with Bill. There were problems with those IIRC. No "limp - in" mode to them. They just quit.

VANWALL
01-18-2009, 12:07
The BRM H16 was developed for the 3 liter F1 engine rules that started in 1966 (maybe 67). The H16 was two flat 8 engines geared together. Think about it each flat 8 was 1.5 liters or approx 91 cubic inches, talk about small. I believe only one race was won with this engine.

http://i72.photobucket.com/albums/i171/vanwall2490/BRM_H16_engine.jpg

http://i72.photobucket.com/albums/i171/vanwall2490/BRMH161.jpg

I have read about the v16 BRM engine from the 50's. Supercharged the engine produced a lot of HP but in a narrow rpm range. When the engine reached the power range the tires would break loose.

Bill Powell
01-18-2009, 13:14
I was drawing off a forty year old memory on these engines, and have proving once agian the old quote, "The vast amount of knowledge I retain surprises me not at all; What astounds me is the amount I remember wrong." I am pretty sure about the three liter change. I was at the Nurburgring in 1966 and it was a mixed field. The three liter cars were there, but Gurney was still running the 1-1/2 liter Eagle. I'll have to dig through my old magazines cause I'm still sure I remember the Vanwall right. I remembered the BRM being 1-1/2 liter total.

Eric
01-18-2009, 13:22
Well the story and the fact that someone would re-do a bloody VW of that type. I've never worked on them, but I was under the impression their computer boxes were not the "peak" of German engineering.

The old Squarebacks and Notchbacks have a HUGE following, as do all old VW's. Do a search for Squareback or Notchback in Google images and you'll see some of the custom work done to them. These cars aren't my cup of tea, but many people love them. Eric

Bill Powell
01-18-2009, 16:27
There is a huge VW club here in Houston, with lots of custom VW's as well as stock back into the forties.

Eric
01-18-2009, 16:35
There is a huge VW club here in Houston, with lots of custom VW's as well as stock back into the forties.


Bill could tell you some stories too about some of the characters that are really into the VW scene. There are definitely some, ummm... unique ones in the woodpile.:supergrin: Eric

Bill Powell
01-19-2009, 06:02
Well, the leader of the local pack was a guy named Ken. He had a shop/salvage across the street from me. He looked like a homeless person. He'd wear the same holy T-shirt shirt and shorts for a week, never shaved, well, you know.

The wild part was that Ken was a Duke graduate, well educated, but chose to drop out of the main stream. He wouldn't clean or straighten his yard up and the city kept threatening to haul off all his cars.

Then one day his dad died unexpectedly and we found out Ken was heir to a seat on the local stock exchange. That day, literally in one day, away went the scruffy shorts and T-shirt and on went the button down suit, and he never looked back.

The city hauled off the cars, saving Ken the expense of doing it.

Working in the shop was a black kid who called himself Apache. He was very good at anything automotive he tried. He kept evolving and today owns one of the finest restoration and rod shops in Houston.

Then there was Gerhard the wetback. He was a German who sneaked across the border into Texas from Mexicao and stayed. Gerhard was a tad different. More on him later.

Rager
01-19-2009, 08:41
Thank you Bill.

My only claim to VW hotrodding is knowing a fellow with a stock looking '68 Bug. In the original tan, or it was the last time I saw it. It also had a complete 472 cu in Eldorado drivetrain in it.

Bill Powell
01-19-2009, 20:19
We put a 401 cu in in a 59 VW. We went out to the ordnance salvage and stole a jeep chassis with the slotted mag wheels. M-151 wheels. We had a chunk of abandoned autobahn the Germans let us use for NHRA sanctioned drag racing. The Germans were a tad surprised by the sounds that VW made.

About the same time, in the States, there was a VW called the black widow. It had a Turbonique air turbine attached to a solid rear axle. He used to do match races against dragsters and in a lot of cases, beat them. He found out the VW body ran out of aerodynamics at 180 MPH. He went through the eyes at a tad over 180 MPH, and as he went through the traps the VW shot about twenty feet straight up in the air.

I went to Bug - in when it was held here a few years ago. Just as I arrived there was a bug sedan getting ready to run. I said, "Christ, a VW, break out the hour glasses." Bastard turned a 10.35 at almost 140 MPH running a four cylinder bug engine.

Rager
01-20-2009, 05:40
About the same time, in the States, there was a VW called the black widow. It had a Turbonique air turbine attached to a solid rear axle. He used to do match races against dragsters and in a lot of cases, beat them. He found out the VW body ran out of aerodynamics at 180 MPH. He went through the eyes at a tad over 180 MPH, and as he went through the traps the VW shot about twenty feet straight up in the air.

I went to Bug - in when it was held here a few years ago. Just as I arrived there was a bug sedan getting ready to run. I said, "Christ, a VW, break out the hour glasses." Bastard turned a 10.35 at almost 140 MPH running a four cylinder bug engine.-Gasp-

I, several years back. sorta promised to _go over_ the Q-Jet in the buddy's VW. I knew it was leaking. (never did)

He wound up tearing the 472 apart and punching it, for some forged pistons, aluminum rods and whatever else he could do. I've never ridden in it but there are plenty of stories - like the almost total lack of steering "at speed". Hehe heheh.

My only claim to fame is a little hotting up of a '63 Dart, cough, a 170. Head, cam, ignition, headers, 4bbl, then a 2 bbl. 4 speed out of another buddy's '64 Dart ragtop when his wife wrecked it.
I liked Mark Donahue as a yoot. It was a sleeper. oh boy. a rusty sleeper at that.

Bill Powell
01-20-2009, 05:54
I don't know if you know it, but Mark Donahue was the first college graduate to win the Indy 500.

I don't know if you know this either, but the little Mopar 170 cu in six would turn 9500 RPM right out of the box tuned correctly. There was a guy in Phoenix years ago that ran a Valiant two door sedan at the drags. It had the 170 cu in, with the proper ignition, cam, fuel, exhaust modifications, and a torque-flite transmission. It had one secret weapon. It was not a full torque flite, but a clutch-flite. Instead of a torque converter it had a clutch and pressure plate with two finger going back off the pressure to run the transmission pump. That little 170 would run 100MPH, or in the area, every time.

Rager
01-20-2009, 06:06
I don't know if you know it, but Mark Donahue was the first college graduate to win the Indy 500.

I don't know if you know this either, but the little Mopar 170 cu in six would turn 9500 RPM right out of the box tuned correctly. There was a guy in Phoenix years ago that ran a Valiant two door sedan at the drags. It had the 170 cu in, with the proper ignition, cam, fuel, exhaust modifications, and a torque-flite transmission. It had one secret weapon. It was not a full torque flite, but a clutch-flite. Instead of a torque converter it had a clutch and pressure plate with two finger going back off the pressure to run the transmission pump. That little 170 would run 100MPH, or in the area, every time.
-- No I didn't know that.

-- Ah, ya put a smile on my face this morning.

Bill Powell
01-20-2009, 20:54
Let's see, there was the tie guy, a raging drunk with his VW totally decorated with neck ties. Reall nasty neck ties. Eric worked on this car a couple of times and he was not amused at digging through the stink to get at what ailed the car.

Then there was a VW under a VW.

Go to google and type in art cars, and you will get 47 pages of strange and unusual and strange and unusual guys.

CatsMeow
01-21-2009, 00:25
The darnest thing I ever saw with respect to a VW was at the school parking lot. This guy came to his VW buggy-style vehicle, flipped open the engine hatch, wound a rope around a pulley attached to the alternator, then yanked it, like starting a Briggs & Stratton. Started right up.:supergrin: I forgot to ask him if it was his starting method of choice, or if his battery or starter was kaput that day.

Bill Powell
01-21-2009, 05:57
Eric may remember the time we had a Nash Metropolitan for sale and it had a bad starter. The guy would buy it if he could hear it run, but we could not push start it cause it was in a room surrounded by cars. So, I jacked up the right rear tire, turned on the ignition, put the transmission in high gear, grabbed the right rear tire, and yanked. It started right up. Freaked the guy out.

There was a guy in the old Baja 1000 off road race who was running a VW sand rail and he broke his battery. He wired up his ignition to a 6 volt dry cell battery and when he needed to start the engine and there was no one available to push it he would jack up the right rear, wrap a rope around the tire and pull start it. Don't work on a limited slip.

Rager
01-21-2009, 07:08
I have another friend, as far as good stories, who hot wired a car with coat hangers. He was marooned at someone else's garage or something, and there were no keys for anything, (and no cell phones), it was years ago.

Tapped the coil and did the starter and drove BABY!

Bill Powell
01-21-2009, 18:17
Years ago our company runner drove a little Chevy Luv pick-up. It died, or he shut it off on the side of the freeway and the battery was too low to re-start it. He called me from a store and I went on the service call in a Rolls Royce Corniche convertible, thinking he had jumper cables. When I got there he had none. I backed the rear bumper of the Rolls up hard against his front bumper for the ground. I used the Rolls jack handle and the Luv jack handle and went from positive post to positive post and the Chevy started. I got one stunned look from the cop who asked me what we were doing and lots of odd looks from motorists.

One day this idiot runner found a barrel that I had cut off a shotgun and was poking it out his truck scaring the hell out of people.Just after he did it to one guy he got stuck in a left turn lane with the guy he'd just scared right behind him. The guy walked up with a tire iron and the runner showed him it was fake. The guy worked him over with the tire iron for such a stupid joke. So sayeth Eric.

The runner's buddy shot his lower face off with a twelve guage. He said it was an accident but most people didn't think so. He'll eat with a syrenge all his life.

Bill Powell
01-22-2009, 19:16
I think the runner's name was Tommy. He was little odd, and his friend with the shot off face was more that a little odd.

Jefs
01-22-2009, 19:32
I think the runner's name was Tommy. He was little odd, and his friend with the shot off face was more that a little odd.

The "shot off face" - Lord have mercy, I must have missed something previous or I'm in need of elaboration.

Bill Powell
01-22-2009, 19:51
Tommy and his friend said they out hunting, and the friend crawled under a fence dragging his shotgun by the end of the barrel. Just as the end of the barrel touched his chin the trigger snagged on a root or something and went off. kWhen I met him he had been five or six surgeries and was looking at half a dozen more. He wore a surgeon's mask and had had to blend all his food into a drinkable soup which he ate with a basting syrenge. The amazing thing was his speech, it was perfiect.

Eric's mom asked Tommy wouldn't it attract less attention if he just took the mask off. Tommy told her that he could positively guarantee her it would not attract less attention.

I never knew of Tommy and his cohorts hunting. I think the kid just screwed up a perfectly good suicide.

Jefs
01-22-2009, 20:03
Tommy and his friend said they out hunting, and the friend crawled under a fence dragging his shotgun by the end of the barrel. Just as the end of the barrel touched his chin the trigger snagged on a root or something and went off. kWhen I met him he had been five or six surgeries and was looking at half a dozen more. He wore a surgeon's mask and had had to blend all his food into a drinkable soup which he ate with a basting syrenge. The amazing thing was his speech, it was perfiect.

Eric's mom asked Tommy wouldn't it attract less attention if he just took the mask off. Tommy told her that he could positively guarantee her it would not attract less attention.

I never knew of Tommy and his cohorts hunting. I think the kid just screwed up a perfectly good suicide.

Bill you have lived a much more extensinve/intensive existence than me and I salute you. Did I mention Lord have mercy :shocked: and how I thank my lucky stars for my sheltered exisence? Reality can be a tad harsh. Yikes and woof, glad I missed that.

Bill Powell
01-22-2009, 20:47
Reality can sneak up behind you and kick you square on the ass.

Bill Powell
01-24-2009, 09:22
We seemed to attract suicidal people there for awhile. We had a gorgeous 1955 Chevy two door post sedan on consignment. It was quite a hot rod, with late model drive train, custom wheels, beautiful finish and a wool and leather interior.

A guy came, looked at and test drove the car, went to his bank and came back with cash for the car. Everyone parted smiling. Couple of days later we got a call from a Houston police detective asking if we knew the car and what our envolvement was with it. Seems the guy bought the car drove about ten miles, parked on the side of the road, swallowed a 12 ga barrel and pulled the trigger. That car sat there for two or three days without anyone checking on it in that blistering summer heat. After the police did stop to investigate the car they found him lying on the seat.

A coupe of days after the police called us the guy's mother called us wanting us to buy the car back. "I don't think so!" I told her.

Rager
01-24-2009, 18:00
We seemed to attract suicidal people there for awhile. We had a gorgeous 1955 Chevy two door post sedan on consignment. It was quite a hot rod, with late model drive train, custom wheels, beautiful finish and a wool and leather interior. Ouch.

My BIL just sorta kinda drank himself to death about six weeks ago, (unless I already have mentioned it on GlockTalk.) (First thing I thought of, was something you see off of the freeway. A dog chained forever and a circle, ah never mind, I really don't want to run him down.

Actually no one gave a flying can of rhubarb. He had a Cranium to ass infarction, perhaps facilitated by his alcoholic father, but *HEY* he was 61. I'm not quite that old and I've just recently stopped smelling something funny myself. (B grin)

Bill Powell
01-25-2009, 07:42
Every family has a member, blood or in-law, that makes you appreciate any time you can get away from that person. I had one BIL that was a binge drinker. He would go months without a drink and when he popped a cork he was desperate to drink all the stock in the local liquor store. What got him was attrition. You can only so many times pass out and tear a hole in your head when you hit the corner of a piece of furniture on your way to the floor. When you do that time after time, and almost bleeding to death before hospital help arrives, it has to be tough on the body.

Bill Powell
01-26-2009, 19:05
Had another one who I could vever determine if I'd never seen him sober, or had never seen him drunk. I found out later I had never seen him sober, cause when I did he turned out to be a surly bastard.

Hydraulicman
01-26-2009, 19:14
lol funny stuff. if he had a quality flashlight he would not need that stupid stake. lol

Rager
01-27-2009, 04:07
Had another one who I could vever determine if I'd never seen him sober, or had never seen him drunk. I found out later I had never seen him sober, cause when I did he turned out to be a surly bastard.I have a buddy whom it was thought was also drunk continuously. He always seemed straight to me. He did have a cous', that needed a couple of beers for breakfast though. (jus' saying)

Bill Powell
01-28-2009, 19:24
I started building a giant combat bowie many years ago, my son Jim did some work on it, and my brother did some more work on it. Now I'm going to build a sheath for it, and I found a laser printer that will write what I want. On the side of the blade I want to put SATAN TOOTH. Around the extra thick hand guard, in very small print, I want <when you got em' by the balls, their hearts and minds will follow.> I've buying up some leather working tools and tooling leather.

Rager
01-29-2009, 05:13
I started building a giant combat bowie many years ago, my son Jim did some work on it, and my brother did some more work on it. Now I'm going to build a sheath for it, and I found a laser printer that will write what I want. On the side of the blade I want to put SATAN TOOTH. Around the extra thick hand guard, in very small print, I want <when you got em' by the balls, their hearts and minds will follow.> I've buying up some leather working tools and tooling leather.
Do you already have one of those sail maker hand sewers Bill? (hand stitcher) http://www.safetycentral.com/spsthaoplese.html - posted for anyone else that may not know 'em. Good for fixing up canvas, shoes, leather. Lots of stuff.

I've got a half-way decent watch now, now that my above mentioned BIL went away, but I don't care for the fancy stainless band. I just don't like it. It's either to big or too small.

I have a wide leather wrist, ?gaunlet. It's a fair chunk of leather and I'd like to make up the proper tie downs for latching the watch to it. But it's not a major project, I wear the watch for show mostly.

-- and yeah pitchures piktures!

Bill Powell
01-29-2009, 20:29
The pictures are a couple of weeks away. My E-bay items are just now starting to come in.

Rager
01-30-2009, 02:56
The pictures are a couple of weeks away. My E-bay items are just now starting to come in.
Ahh. The Bay is being very good to me.

At worst I seem to be getting at least what I thing everything is worth. -if that makes any sense- ;)

ChrisVV
01-30-2009, 03:00
Great story, quick thinking to move that stake!

Bill Powell
01-30-2009, 05:53
It just seemed the thing to do at the time, ChrisVV. I knew he knew a fast way out of tha compound, or at lest he thought he did. If we saw a Slicky Boy we sere to shout HALT three times in english and three times in Korean, and if they still didn't drop the stop, or at least drop the item, we were supposed to fire a warning shot in the air, or as a last resort, fire a shot at the lower extremeties. Occassionally at night you could here the Korean civilian security we hired yell. "HALTHALTHALT, BLAM BLAM." Suffice it to say that when they caught a Slicky Boy his civil rights was the last thing on their mind.

Rager, I'm just amazed at how popular, and how pricey leather working tools are.

paynter2
01-30-2009, 06:56
Hey Bill - It's warming up here in the north land. It's only -17 this morning. That's up from -27 Monday. But, it's supposed to get close to 30 tomorrow. I need to change oil in my car - I figure I can do it in a t-shirt tomorrow!

I'm thinking of going into the mining business. There's plenty of raw material here in the People's Republik of Minnesota...

http://www.iii.co.uk/shares/?type=news&articleid=7143608&action=article

Rager
01-30-2009, 21:42
Rager, I'm just amazed at how popular, and how pricey leather working tools are.Mmm. I don't do any leather stuff but I've had one of those stitchers for a long time. I have a relatively good book on making leather goods. Some glossy pictures and details on clamps for holding the work - right. Most of the stitching is the same as on a feed bag fwiw.

Bill Powell
01-31-2009, 08:29
Warming up in the north lands, huh? We are getting your used cold air. It was almost freezing here this morning. We had to wait for the sun to come out to pull off our jackets. After your post I mounted a metal detector in my toilet.

Bill Powell
02-01-2009, 07:11
Today ends the Houston Auto Show, and it kind of reflects the economy from the auto point of view. It is sort af a bare bones show, with Jaguar not showing at all, nor Suzuki. Only about three concept cars in the whole show, and a few pre-production cars. We have two cars displayed in the antique display, which I have to pick up today. We are displaying a 1963 427 cu in Mercury Marauder and a 1962 Lincoln 4 door convertible.

Rager
02-02-2009, 05:54
Today ends the Houston Auto Show, and it kind of reflects the economy from the auto point of view. It is sort af a bare bones show, with Jaguar not showing at all, nor Suzuki. Only about three concept cars in the whole show, and a few pre-production cars. We have two cars displayed in the antique display, which I have to pick up today. We are displaying a 1963 427 cu in Mercury Marauder and a 1962 Lincoln 4 door convertible.
Nice suicide-door Bill.

I have a late buddy who kept his sanity working on few of them. Txs for the update!

Bill Powell
02-02-2009, 06:12
I picked up the cars last evening and they both got participation trophies. When you answer their call for a car, or cars, for them to use, you will win something.

The '62 is toward the end of the smallish Continentals, it's more of a Thunderbird size. I use to make extra pocket money keeping those Continental, and Thunderbird Convertible tops working, and the Ford style power window switches.

paynter2
02-02-2009, 07:38
Wow - that car looks big to me!

I fixed a power window switch on my Corolla. Last fall I was driving from home to St. Paul. I accidentally downed the passenger rear window. When I tried to put it up, it didn't move. I stopped and tried the switch again - the window moved a little. So, I got out, opened the door and pushed up on the window with my hand flat while I pushed the switch.

I finally got the window up. The next weekend, I popped the plastic module, that contains the switch, out of the arm rest. I unplugged the switch - window fixed.

The car has 130K miles and I don't need that window to be down at any time. I wonder what Toyota would charge me to fix it???

Rager
02-02-2009, 16:57
Wow - that car looks big to me!

The car has 130K miles and I don't need that window to be down at any time. I wonder what Toyota would charge me to fix it???

Ten years ago No Charge. Toyota would have warrantied it for you. They wanted US bidness.

Bill Powell
02-02-2009, 19:50
The car looks huge in profile, in a photo. It will never be accused of being petite, but it aint that big, about like one of the big Thunderbirds. I like the '63 Mercury Marauder we had there. 427, two fours, four speed, and 900 pounds of attitude. I like your window solution. Rager is right about Toyota then, but they are not nearly that accommodating noThey grow lizards big here in Texas

Edsel Ford had to write his old man a check for 100,000 dollars when this red car was finished. The car was built in the Ford tri-motor plant, and the seats are tri motor.

Bill Powell
02-02-2009, 19:56
...........the red car

Bill Powell
02-04-2009, 19:30
Did you ever do anything so bizarre, seemingly impossible, that left the witnesses to your adventure speechless for a moment? Well, my friend Wesley and I were able to do that. We saw thsi bit on an old Keystone Cops type movie, and duplicated it.

My friend Wesley had a 1929 Ford Model A 2 dr sedan. KTo set up the gaq we had to do some carpentry work on the car. I built a large shoe box sized wooden box, with a trap door and mounted to the left frame rail right under the stering column. I had a string tied to the trap door latch.

KWeric will even know the spot this happened. It was at Adonis and Live Oak, the last light in town going east. There used to be a drug store there. a bank, and other stuff. Now I think mostly just there is there, unless the artsy folks have that corner.

Anyway, back to the story. If you advance the throttle, or the accelerator, and the timing advance at the same time, you can make a huge muffler explosion. Wesley did that, and when he did that I yanked on the string and dumped pistons and valves and other engine parts all over the street. I jumped and, after closing the trap door, picked up all the debris and tossed it back in the box. Meanwhile he is trying to start the car. After I picked everything up I backed off and kicked the hell out of the bumper, and he turned on the ignition as I got in the car, it started, and we drove away.

When we drove out of sight the cars had not moved; the drivers just sat there, staring. Not a word was said, nothing.

paynter2
02-05-2009, 20:58
Ten years ago No Charge. Toyota would have warrantied it for you. They wanted US bidness.

I've driven Toyotas since 1980. I'm well aware of how they used to treat their customers. Things have changed.

Bill: I pulled a pretty good practical joke at work yesterday. We had a big shake-up in the office. We got a new manager a year or so ago and he decided to change things around - because he could. They tell us how well we've been doing and then decide to change things.

Anyway, a team member had a walk-thru of some new software that he created. Our new supervisor attended as did my entire team. Now the team member (presenter) is wired pretty tight. He's an alright guy. One of those who's pretty loose on the outside and pretty tight on the inside.

Well, he's got some new screens that will be used for some Federal affidavits that we have to 'sign' each year in order to work in my office.

His screens worked perfectly. You read the document and enter Y or N to signify your acceptance (or not). You enter 'Y' and you have access to our system.

Then, the new supervisor asked: "What happens if you enter 'N'? Well, team member got a blank look on his face and said: "You know, I've never tried that".

Well, I'm sitting by a wall where the data cable from our network enters the room and plugs into his lap-top. As he logs back onto his panels I get ready. He enters 'N' and I pull the plug. Black-out!

It was unbelievable. He's in panic mode. The new supervisor is trying not to laugh - office politics you know. I didn't have to worry about it - I laughed so hard I could hardly sit on my chair. The woman next to me saw me do it and she was literally crying!

Old team member tried to laugh after all was said and done - but humor is not one of his stronger suits. That makes him perfect for such a stunt.