Apple pushes anti-virus for Macs [Archive] - Glock Talk

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IndyGunFreak
12-02-2008, 07:34
LOL

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http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/7760344.stm

BuckyP
12-02-2008, 12:17
Would anyone be surprised to find that the writers of these viruses are employed by .... Microsoft??
:outtahere:

grokdesigns
12-02-2008, 15:00
They've been recommending this for a long time:
http://gizmodo.com/5100996/false-alarm-apple-mac-os-x-anti+virus-recommendation-is-old

IndyGunFreak
12-02-2008, 15:02
They've been recommending this for a long time:
http://gizmodo.com/5100996/false-alarm-apple-mac-os-x-anti+virus-recommendation-is-old

The article just struck me as funny, because I was talking to a Mac head who was saying no way could a mac get a virus, etc, and then while doing some other stuff, I came across that article. Any operating system can be compromised, Linux, Unix, Solaris, Mac, Windows, you name it. It all boils down to the morons pounding on the keys to keep viruses away.. :)

IGF

Rémy
12-02-2008, 15:09
There are no viruses available (in the real world) for Mac OS.
This is only a recommendation to avoid being charged by someone in the future or by some stupid guys (like the ones who are putting their pets in the microwave...)

IndyGunFreak
12-02-2008, 15:16
There are no viruses available (in the real world) for Mac OS.
This is only a recommendation to avoid being charged by someone in the future or by some stupid guys (like the ones who are putting their pets in the microwave...)

The article mentions a couple of Mac vulnerabilities.. Every OS is vulnerable, to suggest otherwise is naive.

IGF

noway
12-02-2008, 17:01
I've been using MACs since OS 8.X, never seen a Anti-Virsus need. I've open tons of email, download tons of files and never had to ctrl-alt-del and reformat ;)

Big Al 24
12-02-2008, 19:12
The article mentions a couple of Mac vulnerabilities.. Every OS is vulnerable, to suggest otherwise is naive.

IGF

+1...It should say that there are no "known" viri for the mac. Mac's "invulnerability" arrogance, is just inviting hackers to hurt them. Nothing a hacker likes better than a challenge.

Rémy
12-03-2008, 06:00
There are challenges nearly every year where Crackers try to infiltrate Macs.
If you don't work as an admin on your Mac it still is impossible (unless you authenticate with your admin User/Password). But it's really obvious if you work and your Mac wants your admin password out of nowhere...

I know... it's pretty hard to believe for Windows Users but there aren't viruses on Mac OS.

IndyGunFreak
12-03-2008, 06:18
But it's really obvious if you work and your Mac wants your admin password out of nowhere...


Again, boils down to the bozo pounding on the keys. The viruses are there, its just getting them installed onto a system that requires work.

Prime example...

It doesn't happen much w/ Ubuntu because Root is disabled by default in Ubuntu, but when I've helped in Debian channels with new users, they get tired of entering their password, etc, and just begin to run their system as root. Well, when you do this, you more or less make your system about as secure as Windows...

IGF

Rémy
12-03-2008, 16:11
Apple just changed their minds...
they said that this was part of an older support document.
They deleted the Virus Scanner recomendation today.

The Pontificator
12-03-2008, 16:29
Apple just changed their minds...
they said that this was part of an older support document.
They deleted the Virus Scanner recomendation today.

Apple removed an old item from its support site late Tuesday that urged Mac customers to use multiple antivirus utilities and now says the Mac is safe "out of the box."

"We have removed the KnowledgeBase article because it was old and inaccurate," Apple spokesperson Bill Evans said.

"The Mac is designed with built-in technologies that provide protection against malicious software and security threats right out of the box," he said. "However, since no system can be 100 percent immune from every threat, running antivirus software may offer additional protection."

Apple's previous security message in its KnowledgeBase, which serves as a tutorial for Mac users, was: "Apple encourages the widespread use of multiple antivirus utilities so that virus programmers have more than one application to circumvent, thus making the whole virus writing process more difficult."

Security experts, while pleased that Apple would urge Mac users to install antivirus software, had warned that running multiple antivirus products could cause problems and recommended against it.

Apple's antivirus support note was initially published last year and was updated last month, despite reports that it was a new note.

One Apple expert speculated that Apple was merely removing a poorly worded support note and said it probably wasn't ever Apple's intention to tell Mac users they need antivirus.

"I bet you it was a low-level support note and it hadn't gone through the right approvals," said Rich Mogull, security editor of Apple news site TidBITS. "That's my guess."

To some, Apple's latest move will be seen as back-tracking given that it comes one day after those misleading reports circulated. The motive remains unclear, particularly because Apple didn't replace the previously published suggestion with an updated one.

The message that remains is that Mac users don't really need to take additional steps to protect against viruses and other malware. Telling customers they can run antivirus for "additional protection" could be interpreted as a way to protect against any liability.

There are no known viruses in the wild that exploit a vulnerability in the Mac OS, and Windows continues to be the overwhelming preference for malware writers to target their programs. But malware isn't just taking advantage of operating system weaknesses anymore. In fact, the majority of such threats now come from code that targets weaknesses in browsers and other applications that aren't platform specific.

Mogull said he doesn't recommend that the average Mac user install antivirus software because of the low-level of malicious software seen for Macs at this time.

To me, this new Apple statement poses more questions than it answers.

Regardless of the meaning of Apple's latest action, I'm pleased to now have open lines of communication with the company. Over the last few months, I have had an increasingly difficult time getting any response to my e-mails and phone calls. For instance, I got no response to my requests for comment on Monday's article about this topic. However, after talking to several Apple spokespeople on Tuesday about the matter I am confident that the situation has been cleared up.

I also was reminded of how much collective knowledge CNET readers have about Apple and would like to extend an invitation for people to feel free to contact me directly at elinor.mills@cnet.com with any feedback and tips related to Apple security issues.

Big Al 24
12-03-2008, 19:04
A comparison to the Titanic comes to mind.

IndyGunFreak
12-03-2008, 20:02
A comparison to the Titanic comes to mind.

:rofl::rofl:

[Wizard of Oz] Pay no attention to that man... [/Wizard of Oz]

IGF

justinsn95
12-03-2008, 20:23
There are no viruses available (in the real world) for Mac OS.
This is only a recommendation to avoid being charged by someone in the future or by some stupid guys (like the ones who are putting their pets in the microwave...)

The only reason there is not more of them is because they have something like 9% of the market share. If (or when) they get more, they will have their fair share.

Rémy
12-04-2008, 02:29
The only reason there is not more of them is because they have something like 9% of the market share. If (or when) they get more, they will have their fair share.

Apple is #1 in some countries in the Edu market.
In the US consumer market about 21%, worldwide 10% (in 2007).

There are only 400 Unix viruses out there, most of them are from the 70s (don't work on actual Mac OS X or Linux systems) and if I'm not mistaken all of them need to be executed as root.
The reason why there are no viruses out there is the fact that you have to work as root (which no one does) in order to activate the virus.

noway
12-04-2008, 03:54
Apple is #1 in some countries in the Edu market.
In the US consumer market about 21%, worldwide 10% (in 2007).

There are only 400 Unix viruses out there, most of them are from the 70s (don't work on actual Mac OS X or Linux systems) and if I'm not mistaken all of them need to be executed as root.
The reason why there are no viruses out there is the fact that you have to work as root (which no one does) in order to activate the virus.

ditto


And would the 400 Unix viruses technically be malware ?

Rémy
12-04-2008, 05:03
ditto


And would the 400 Unix viruses technically be malware ?

If you use a Unix system of the 70s and if that system would run on todays computers and if you are going to work as root and if you would get one of these viruses (most of them are lab-viruses and never saw daylight) and if...

Then technically it would be malware... :)