How to stop my GSD from play biting? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Calculated
12-12-2008, 19:37
My beloved GSD is fantastic in almost every way except for her play biting....IT HURTS!!! What should I do to train her out of this unbecoming habit?

GSD/G23
12-12-2008, 19:53
My unprofessional opinion: When playing turns to biting, stop, make her sit until she is calm and that "wild look" is out of her eyes. Then slowly begin playing again while trying not to escalate the game to the "biting" stage. When the biting starts again, stop, make her sit etc., etc.

If you can be extremely consistent with this approach, she should get the idea quickly, I mean after all she is a German Shepherd! :supergrin:

This has worked well for me in the past but the key is being consistent.

Calculated
12-12-2008, 20:03
Thanks for the reply! Funny thing is, she only does it to me now. She would also bite my wife like this until my wife bit her on the ear hard enough to make her squeal. I'm not going to do that because I WILL NOT inflict any pain on her...seemed like it worked though.

Platz
12-12-2008, 21:51
You've got a few options here, take your pick as to which you want to try first.

1) Make her squeal right back. Your wife had the right approach. There are various methods to this approach, depends on the dog and the handler.

2) Works better for puppies, but I'll give it to you as an option regardless and you can give it a shot. This method backfires on some adults, so be forwarned. Puppies - if they haven't learned bite inhibition from litter mates or mom properly for whatever reason, sometimes a very LOUD and very SHARP high pitched yelp of surprise from you when pup bites is enough to startle them and teach them that hey, that hurts. Some adult dogs get more amped up by this response, and causes more excitement biting. You've been warned. ;)

3) Redirect, my personal perferred method. Set her up for failure, which will end up in success. Get a rope toy (this is the only time I utilize rope toys) and keep it in one hand or very nearby to where you are. Get the dog amped up, get her biting, and quickly give her the toy to chew on rather than you hand. You are in essense redirecting her to an appropriate toy to chew on.

You can, of course, do the usual "ah ah, no bite" but good luck getting much of anywhere with that. Quickest method is to make her squeal right back. Longest training method is the re-direct, although it is by far the most "positive" training method listed above. So if you're wanting to steer clear of anything perceived as negative, that's your best route. If I've got a dog blowing through re-direct after re-direct, I'm going to make them squeal eventually. Biting is a big no-no in this house, under any circumstances. I don't care how excited they are, or how little harm they meant, so I don't play games with it. If the dog persists in being mouthy and is far out of the puppy stage, they learn very quickly that their mouth is to be kept to themselves and never, ever, placed on a person unless directed to do so.

Loves2shoot
12-12-2008, 23:37
You've got a few options here, take your pick as to which you want to try first.

1) Make her squeal right back. Your wife had the right approach. There are various methods to this approach, depends on the dog and the handler.

2) Works better for puppies, but I'll give it to you as an option regardless and you can give it a shot. This method backfires on some adults, so be forwarned. Puppies - if they haven't learned bite inhibition from litter mates or mom properly for whatever reason, sometimes a very LOUD and very SHARP high pitched yelp of surprise from you when pup bites is enough to startle them and teach them that hey, that hurts. Some adult dogs get more amped up by this response, and causes more excitement biting. You've been warned. ;)

3) Redirect, my personal perferred method. Set her up for failure, which will end up in success. Get a rope toy (this is the only time I utilize rope toys) and keep it in one hand or very nearby to where you are. Get the dog amped up, get her biting, and quickly give her the toy to chew on rather than you hand. You are in essense redirecting her to an appropriate toy to chew on.

You can, of course, do the usual "ah ah, no bite" but good luck getting much of anywhere with that. Quickest method is to make her squeal right back. Longest training method is the re-direct, although it is by far the most "positive" training method listed above. So if you're wanting to steer clear of anything perceived as negative, that's your best route. If I've got a dog blowing through re-direct after re-direct, I'm going to make them squeal eventually. Biting is a big no-no in this house, under any circumstances. I don't care how excited they are, or how little harm they meant, so I don't play games with it. If the dog persists in being mouthy and is far out of the puppy stage, they learn very quickly that their mouth is to be kept to themselves and never, ever, placed on a person unless directed to do so.

Your Option #2 is exactly how I trained my dog to not bite. If you notice that when dogs play too rough with each other one will let out a YIP if it gets hurt. This usually causes the one who was too rough to back off. So, when my dog was a pup and she started her puppy biting, I did the YIPPING noise, she backed right off and I usually said, "No Bite!" At which point I gave our "play time" a few minutes break. So, she learned that she wasn't supposed to "bite" and she learned that "fun" was gone for a bit when she did. Worked well for me. Great Advice!!

Zonny
12-28-2008, 18:30
2) Works better for puppies, but I'll give it to you as an option regardless and you can give it a shot. This method backfires on some adults, so be forwarned. Puppies - if they haven't learned bite inhibition from litter mates or mom properly for whatever reason, sometimes a very LOUD and very SHARP high pitched yelp of surprise from you when pup bites is enough to startle them and teach them that hey, that hurts. Some adult dogs get more amped up by this response, and causes more excitement biting. You've been warned. ;)


Since reading this, I have used this with my 7 week old Miniature Schnuazer pup. With great results I might add.

Prior to this, I had used the "NO BITE" and re-direct combo. Sometimes the 're-direct' is her own paw.

Maxx702
12-28-2008, 18:58
When my knuckle head starts the play biting, he gats a stern NO! and play time is over, time to chill out in his cage.

He's learning.

Platz
12-28-2008, 21:45
Since reading this, I have used this with my 7 week old Miniature Schnuazer pup. With great results I might add.


Glad to hear it's working for your pup. :)

Zonny
12-28-2008, 22:15
Since reading this, I have used this with my 7 week old Miniature Schnuazer pup. With great results I might add.

Prior to this, I had used the "NO BITE" and re-direct combo. Sometimes the 're-direct' is her own paw.


Glad to hear it's working for your pup. :)

But then how could anything with a face like this need disciplined?

http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j62/PearlMarie/IMG_0886.jpg

GlockRik
12-28-2008, 22:53
I would grasp the dog's muzzle and give it a squeeze and shake with a firm no. Just enough force to show displeasure. If the young dog becomes too rough with it's mother, she does almost the same thing, except usually by the scruff of the neck.

Rik

Platz
12-29-2008, 08:28
But then how could anything with a face like this need disciplined?

http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j62/PearlMarie/IMG_0886.jpg

He looks completely innocent. Perhaps you're mistaking another puppy for him who is misbehaving? :whistling: