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Blitzer
02-02-2009, 07:09
More BS from those in the loop of responsibility. :steamed:

US Supplies Shrinking in Afghanistan (http://www.military.com/news/article/us-supplies-shrinking-in-afghanistan.html?ESRC=eb.nl)

http://images.military.com/cs/Satellite?blobcol=urldata&blobheadername1=Content-Type&blobheadername2=Content-Disposition&blobheadervalue1=image%2Fjpeg&blobheadervalue2=inline%3Bfilename%3DFL_afghansupplies_020209.jpg&blobkey=id&blobnocache=false&blobtable=MungoBlobs&blobwhere=1209979141560&ssbinary=true

February 02, 2009

Chicago Tribune <!-- Uncomment this when the Jive comments functionality is available -->

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KABUL, Afghanistan -- The milk is now pulled from the mess hall by 9 a.m., to ration the limited supply.

At the Camp Phoenix base store nearby, the shelves look bare. There's no Irish Spring Body Wash, no Doritos, no Tostitos Scoops, no Bayer Aspirin.

"We're having the same problems all over Afghanistan," said Randy Barnes, who manages warehouses for the Army & Air Force Exchange Service, which operates stores at many of the bases where U.S. troops are deployed in the war on terror here.

For the Soldiers at Camp Phoenix, about 650 of whom are from the Illinois National Guard, the missing supplies underscore what senior military officials have been saying for months: U.S. and coalition troops must find new routes to supply what will be a rapidly growing force in Afghanistan, ones that avoid the treacherous border areas of Pakistan where convoys have been ambushed.

Supplying an army in any war is crucial; it's not just bullets and bombs, but everything from fuel to lettuce, that must be shipped in by the ton and the truckload. And a country like Afghanistan -- landlocked, mountainous and with few good roads -- poses enormously difficult challenges even without attacks by militants.

Gen. David Petraeus, the chief of U.S. Central Command, announced late last month that the military had reached transit deals with Russia and several Central Asian states to the north of Afghanistan, to provide an alternate route from Pakistan. But it's not yet clear whether any new route would be able to absorb the heavy traffic.

"It is very important as we increase the effort in Afghanistan that we have multiple routes that go into the country," Petraeus said.

President Barack Obama has made the fight against militants in Pakistan and Afghanistan -- rather than in Iraq -- his top priority in the war on terror. His administration is expected to send as many as 30,000 more U.S. troops to Afghanistan in the coming months.

The supply-route challenge is politically sensitive; as long as the U.S. and coalition troops depend on Pakistan to move supplies, it's difficult to be too critical of its government's help in the war on terror. Some in Washington have questioned Pakistan's commitment.

But a route through Russia and neighboring countries is not necessarily a long-term solution either. The over-land route is much longer and more expensive, and dealing with repressive regimes in Central Asia also could pose political dilemmas.

Sensitive military goods, such as weapons and ammunition, are transported by military convoy or air, and have not been hurt by supply-route problems, officials say. Air transport for non-combat goods is prohibitively expensive and also logistically difficult.

Right now, subcontractors transport about 75 percent of non-sensitive military goods for U.S. troops and a smaller but significant amount for NATO troops from the port in Karachi, Pakistan, through the Torkham border crossing into Afghanistan. About 125 shipping containers pass through that crossing daily.

It's the shortest route to Kabul and Bagram Air Base, the largest U.S. base in Afghanistan, yet it goes through narrow roads, mountain passes and hostile areas.

Despite the risk, security is often lax. In recent months, Taliban-led militants have frequently attacked the military shipping containers, often stored by these subcontractors just outside Peshawar, Pakistan, in five ramshackle yards with little security and no barbed wire. Militants have destroyed more than 300 shipping containers so far, torching at least 80 Humvees for the Afghan National Army.

Pakistani officials blamed the subcontractors for sacrificing security for profit.

"There are two or three guards, no lights, no cameras. An office consists of an empty container, two broken-down chairs, no phone and no fax line," said Tariq Hayat Khan, the political agent for Khyber tribal agency, which includes the main road from Peshawar to Torkham. "By no stretch of the imagination can you call them shipping terminals. They've just started leveling fields and stacking containers. All they do is charge money and deliver from Point A to Point B."

Because of the escalating number of attacks, Pakistan has suspended traffic through this crossing three times in the past seven weeks to launch offensives against militants. At the other major crossing in Pakistan, through Chaman in Baluchistan province, tribesmen blockaded the road for five days recently because a tribesman was killed, stranding hundreds of trucks and fuel tankers.

Barnes said some of the destroyed containers set on fire near Peshawar were bound for stores at U.S. military bases. He said his company was still determining what was lost.

In a roadside bomb attack on the route a couple weeks ago, four shipping containers filled with "near beer," soda and water for the troops were hit, dooming the entire shipment bound for Camp Phoenix and Camp Eggers, said Lt. Col. Eric Little, 37, of Springfield, the garrison commander for Camp Phoenix.

Only at the end of January -- a month late -- did the last of 21 shipping containers with the personal goods of Illinois National Guard Soldiers arrive at Camp Phoenix.

"The majority of stuff makes it from Point A to Point B -- but not necessarily timely," said Little, adding that finding other supply routes was a necessity.

Taliban-led militants are not the only ones to blame. Some drivers are known to steal fuel and supplies from the trucks, or fake militant attacks and sell the goods, commonly available at markets in Kabul and near Bagram. Islamic holidays and tribal conflicts have also been used as an excuse for the massive delays.

Although the supply-route problems are not yet hurting the military effort here, they affect daily life at the bases, at least at Camp Phoenix, usually one of the most well-stocked because it is in the capital.

"I've never seen the store this empty, ever," said Ula Loi, the store manager.

The troops can still get medicine from the medical tents, where the stocked supplies are plentiful, so the only immediate shortages are quality-of-life ones, which probably won't win much sympathy from Soldiers in more remote bases. Still, most snacks, half the beauty products, and all the adapter plugs and combination locks are sold out.
Last week, several Illinois National Guard Soldiers complained about the empty shelves -- one traded a pack of spare razor blades for a bag of chips, neither of which were available.

"They don't even have any Vaseline," said 2nd Lt. Michael Quam, 27, from Dubuque, Iowa, who wanted Vaseline for an Afghan friend whose wife just had a baby.


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deadday
02-02-2009, 10:41
At the Camp Phoenix base store nearby, the shelves look bare. There's no Irish Spring Body Wash, no Doritos, no Tostitos Scoops, no Bayer Aspirin



Oh, those poor ****ing babies!! How the **** can the Army expect them to be deployed without Doritos? ****ing pathetic.....The COB I was on didn't have a PX...****, it didn't have a DFAC, we had a tent where the cooks served food when the supply trucks actually made it through to us...When that didn't happen (which was more often than not), we ate jam sandwiches...Two pieces of bread, a little bit of strawberry jam, and that was it....****ing worthless REMF POGUES....

Blitzer
02-02-2009, 17:08
Oh, those poor ****ing babies!! How the **** can the Army expect them to be deployed without Doritos? ****ing pathetic.....The COB I was on didn't have a PX...****, it didn't have a DFAC, we had a tent where the cooks served food when the supply trucks actually made it through to us...When that didn't happen (which was more often than not), we ate jam sandwiches...Two pieces of bread, a little bit of strawberry jam, and that was it....****ing worthless REMF POGUES....

Tell us how you really feel.:dunno:

deadday
02-02-2009, 17:23
Tell us how you really feel.:dunno:

This is just one of many examples how our military is being pussified and we are losing Soldiers when we shouldn't be...It's just a ****ing game to everyone....They have all the comforts of home on their big FOBs or airfields...They sit around and play X-Box just like they did back home...90% of this Army is sitting on it's ass overseas eating junk food and playing video games while the other 10% are kicking doors everyday, searching caves, doing route clearances...

Jr.
02-25-2009, 15:41
I had a military guy, who's being deployed to afganistan next week come into the store today looking for a .45acp glock. I asked dosent the military supply a beretta side arm? He responded that there is a shortage in sidearms and it was his responsibility to provide his own. Is this a common thing??

deadday
02-25-2009, 17:10
I had a military guy, who's being deployed to afganistan next week come into the store today looking for a .45acp glock. I asked dosent the military supply a beretta side arm? He responded that there is a shortage in sidearms and it was his responsibility to provide his own. Is this a common thing??

Unless he is with AWG (and I think they are solely operating in IQ for the moment) or is associated with SOF of some branch or other, then he's full of ****. He CANNOT provide his own. As to a shortage in sidearms, those that need them, get them.

bennwj
03-03-2009, 06:17
Oh, those poor ****ing babies!! How the **** can the Army expect them to be deployed without Doritos? ****ing pathetic.....The COB I was on didn't have a PX...****, it didn't have a DFAC, we had a tent where the cooks served food when the supply trucks actually made it through to us...When that didn't happen (which was more often than not), we ate jam sandwiches...Two pieces of bread, a little bit of strawberry jam, and that was it....****ing worthless REMF POGUES....

I need to post the "Bob on the FOB" cartoons.

Most of this is just plain complaining from a bunch of Fobbits.

bennwj
03-03-2009, 06:20
Unless he is with AWG (and I think they are solely operating in IQ for the moment) or is associated with SOF of some branch or other, then he's full of ****. He CANNOT provide his own. As to a shortage in sidearms, those that need them, get them.

Yep. The guy is talking more crap than a haji radio station. Even AWG does not supply their own firearms and there are serious, complicated rules for those who are allowed to use non-standard weapons.

AWG and other SOF units have MORE than enough money t buy whatever they need. This guy would not need to buy anything out of his own pocket.

tc556guy
03-06-2009, 03:10
I speant a month last spring in Phoenix before shipping West. The guys in Phoenix are sooooo spoiled, and most of them have no concept of what the rest of the country is like. Thats particularly a problem for the brass, who seem to think that all of afghanistan is like kabul.
Maybe those guys in Phoenix will actually NEED care packages now, and begin to appreciate those of us who needed to wait two months for a package to arrive.

deadday
03-06-2009, 09:20
I speant a month last spring in Phoenix before shipping West. The guys in Phoenix are sooooo spoiled, and most of them have no concept of what the rest of the country is like. Thats particularly a problem for the brass, who seem to think that all of afghanistan is like kabul.
Maybe those guys in Phoenix will actually NEED care packages now, and begin to appreciate those of us who needed to wait two months for a package to arrive.

:rofl::rofl: Never gonna happen brother....Spend any time at KAF? A bad day there is when the Burger King trailer runs outta food...

tc556guy
03-06-2009, 11:11
:rofl::rofl: Never gonna happen brother....Spend any time at KAF? A bad day there is when the Burger King trailer runs outta food...

I've spent my fair share of time at KAF since coming to ARSIC S from the West. Actually, you are wrong. Its not BK; after all, that burned down last fall. The true disaster is when Tim Hortons runs out of stuff. the lines at Hortons are always longer than BKs ( which has re-opened, finally). Oh, there is now a Green Beans on the Boardwalk, as well as an Italian restaurant under construction.

deadday
03-06-2009, 15:29
I've spent my fair share of time at KAF since coming to ARSIC S from the West. Actually, you are wrong. Its not BK; after all, that burned down last fall. The true disaster is when Tim Hortons runs out of stuff. the lines at Hortons are always longer than BKs ( which has re-opened, finally). Oh, there is now a Green Beans on the Boardwalk, as well as an Italian restaurant under construction.

*cue the Bob on the FOB picture* :tongueout::tongueout:

tc556guy
03-06-2009, 19:54
*cue the Bob on the FOB picture* :tongueout::tongueout:
Hey now, watch it..I stay away as much as I can..we go there for fuel, mail, and when we are told to. Too many CSMs running around telling you your boots needs to be bloused and you have too much shadow on your chin.

Javelin
03-06-2009, 20:12
Everyone is going to have it harder than the one before. I will say that in OIF I we had nothing but a make-shift patrol base that is now FOB BrassFieldMora and another one we set up that was named FOB Poliwoda.... Of course in OIF III things got better as we had A/C and CHUs to sleep in.

My heart does go out to those folks who are in charge of closing down Iraq. Having been one of the folks responsible for closing FOB Mckenzie it is a PITA getting all that HET support and make 50 turns with 40 trucks & 80 trailers. Go figure how many turns it is going to close non-legacy FOBs or even LSA's...... that is going to be a serious challenge so let's keep that one in mind when there are only 40,000 troops in Iraq.

:wavey:

deadday
03-06-2009, 20:45
Hey now, watch it..I stay away as much as I can..we go there for fuel, mail, and when we are told to. Too many CSMs running around telling you your boots needs to be bloused and you have too much shadow on your chin.

I've heard the rumors of the CSM that flew around the FOBs and made on the spots....I almost believe after some of the **** that I saw....Ever get a speeding ticket on the FOB? Or a parking ticket?

We blew through the gate one day, had already called ahead, told them we needed in ASAP with wounded, slowed enough so the guard could take a quick look in and then we were off.....By the time we got to the CTAS there was a whole damned Plt of MPs and brass running after us screaming at the top of their lungs....****ing jerkoffs had the nerve to issue a citation (they go straight to your Chain)....Ya know, excuse the **** outta me, but this guy is bleeding out and there is no air anywhere near us...:faint:

deadday
03-06-2009, 20:47
Everyone is going to have it harder than the one before. I will say that in OIF I we had nothing but a make-shift patrol base that is now FOB BrassFieldMora and another one we set up that was named FOB Poliwoda.... Of course in OIF III things got better as we had A/C and CHUs to sleep in.

My heart does go out to those folks who are in charge of closing down Iraq. Having been one of the folks responsible for closing FOB Mckenzie it is a PITA getting all that HET support and make 50 turns with 40 trucks & 80 trailers. Go figure how many turns it is going to close non-legacy FOBs or even LSA's...... that is going to be a serious challenge so let's keep that one in mind when there are only 40,000 troops in Iraq.

:wavey:


That, my friend, is Excedrine migraine #495

geminicricket
04-01-2009, 20:47
And the .gov is no better at getting family's care packages to troops.

Oh, I know (says .gov), we'll trade Russia all their re-expansion plans for a temporary safe passage for lettuce and Irish Spring.

We'll bomb any suspicious character in Pakistan but we won't practice robust convoy escort? Get it, I don't.

kirgi08
04-02-2009, 03:16
I wasn't in that A/O or time frame.We always got our "mail" rt as rain.1 "mail call" a week.We had a # limit but the system seemed ta work.'08.

Truffle8Shuffle
04-27-2009, 13:01
*Not military* But I think my grandfather, who fought in the Bulge, is spinning in his grave right now with these guys worrying about Doritos. I have nothing but respect and admiration for those who serve our nation, but not getting their snacks seems a bit much. I could understand if it was medical supplies or ammo that was running low.

deadday
04-27-2009, 17:20
*Not military* But I think my grandfather, who fought in the Bulge, is spinning in his grave right now with these guys worrying about Doritos. I have nothing but respect and admiration for those who serve our nation, but not getting their snacks seems a bit much. I could understand if it was medical supplies or ammo that was running low.

Dope, gas, and medical supplies all came in by air....we never had issues with that...food, mail, and nonessential gear came overland....when I left, they were currently getting a little less than half of our convoys through...ambushes, washed out roads, snow/ice, etc. etc.


eta-dope=ammo

Truffle8Shuffle
04-27-2009, 20:29
Dope, gas, and medical supplies all came in by air....we never had issues with that...food, mail, and nonessential gear came overland....when I left, they were currently getting a little less than half of our convoys through...ambushes, washed out roads, snow/ice, etc. etc.


eta-dope=ammo

Did you guys ever run low on food? When I say low, I mean did you have to start rationing to make sure you had enough to last for awhile? Thank you for your service.

deadday
04-27-2009, 21:41
Did you guys ever run low on food? When I say low, I mean did you have to start rationing to make sure you had enough to last for awhile? Thank you for your service.

We ate many sugar sandwiches...:wavey:

Truffle8Shuffle
04-27-2009, 22:19
I hope that's military slang for something better than just a sugar sandwich or that you're just joking. Didn't Napoleon say something to the effect of 'an army marches on it's stomach'?

deadday
04-29-2009, 10:18
I hope that's military slang for something better than just a sugar sandwich or that you're just joking. Didn't Napoleon say something to the effect of 'an army marches on it's stomach'?

Bread, sugar, maybe some butter...if we were really lucky, we could have jam sandwiches :wavey: