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FreeFall
02-09-2009, 12:35
I just took my hunter ed class this past Saturday. Late bloomer at 25, but surprisingly nearly half the class was older than me. Fun was had, much was learned, and the memories make a couple of good stories.

With the little backstory out of the way, I was killing some time at my local Sportsman's Warehouse when I noticed their bows were on sale. This made me realize that I need to start looking into getting one so I can get some more time in the field later this year.

I know about rifles, handguns, and shotguns, but I know next to nothing about bows. All I know at this point is that I'd like a decent starting compound.

So does anybody with more experience/wisdom in the matter have any suggestions? I'd appreciate any input at all as I continue my online searching.

Thanks!

noway
02-09-2009, 15:38
What do you want ?

crossbow
compound
longbow
recurve
hunting or target or playing around.

I started out with training wheels ( compound ) and ended up with recurves, due to the cost of accessories and what nots.

they all have advantages and dis-advantages and you have to weigh them seperate and look at them each.

I'll list some the major issues, but a lot exist;

cost
accuracy
cost to maintain
equipment and tools to maintain them
draw weights
cost of accessories
length
handshock

and so on.

FreeFall
02-09-2009, 17:31
Right now I'm leaning towards a compound used for both hunting and target practice, especially the way ammo seems to be going :crying:

Is there anything that would jump right out for those reasons? Are there any major brands I should look for?

Thanks again!

Lethal Farce
02-09-2009, 18:01
I started years ago with a low dollar PSE and got a Matthews after I saw I would enjoy it. Any of the major manufacturers will supply a fine bow. But, you will need some help getting it tuned. Not rocket science, but a local specialist will sure get you shooting good faster. I would not buy anything w/o a local guy to help you.
LF

noway
02-09-2009, 21:04
Only advice I can give, take a archery class before you fork down $$$ for a bow and setup.

I started on a hoyt and ended up on a browning before sold out my stuff. You can find alot of bow and in different setup ( single cam , dual cams, vertical lift, etc......) the list is many and options many.

FreeFall
02-10-2009, 17:38
Thanks for the help guys!

Have no idea why I hadn't thought of looking for local classes. I've got three pro shops nearby (close to Chattanooga, TN) that I just found out about, so I'm hoping to check those out sometime soon.

I'm also registering so I can start on my Bowhunter Education course online and wait for a field day to come up. I love getting certified in different things, so I'm looking forward to it.

Usingmyrights
02-11-2009, 00:41
I will say that not all bows of the same draw weight are the same when it comes to how hard they are to pull back. Limb design and cams have alot to do with it. My Diamond "The Rock" is alot harder to pull back than the Bear Lights Out and the PSE Stinger which were the same draw weight (70lbs). Make sure you get you're drawlength setup correctly, and don't just go by feel. Make sure you have more than on good anchor point to go by, otherwise you won't be consistant. Trust me, when that deer is in bow range your heart is beating like crazy, and you want to make sure you make that shot, because even with quite bows you probably won't get a second chance.

chevy01234
02-11-2009, 16:27
go to www.archerytalk.com There is ALOT of knowledge on that site! Also a huge classifieds section. Some good advice from here too though! My advice, make sure you like it before you spend 1100-1200 dollars on the new "best of the best".

Usingmyrights
02-11-2009, 16:30
go to www.archerytalk.com There is ALOT of knowledge on that site! Also a huge classifieds section. Some good advice from here too though! My advice, make sure you like it before you spend 1100-1200 dollars on the new "best of the best".

+1. Thats where I went. You should be able to get a good entry level bow that you can use for awhile for around $500. They do have some that are cheaper, but I think you'll find yourself wanting a new sooner than later. Spend a little bit more and you should be happy with it for years to come.

Va Vince
02-12-2009, 17:04
go to www.archerytalk.com (http://www.archerytalk.com) There is ALOT of knowledge on that site! Also a huge classifieds section. Some good advice from here too though! My advice, make sure you like it before you spend 1100-1200 dollars on the new "best of the best".

+2 Thats where I buy all my target stuff. I mainly shoot competitions, but when I hunt its with a bow. If you like the easy draw, I would suggest a single cam ( mathews) If you are after some speed and smoothness I say go with a Hoyt. I have been shooting serious now for 4 years and it is like pistols, very addicting. If you have any questions shoot me an e-mail
vstmyerjr20@aol.com

Vince

FreeFall
02-12-2009, 17:31
Thanks guys!

I hope to hit at least a couple of the pro shops around here this weekend. Hopefully they won't be like most other "specialty" stores around here :steamed:

FreeFall
02-14-2009, 21:49
Well, I stopped by three different shops today. I couldn't find much help or info on a class at any of them.

The first had a small selection, and I wasn't really able to get anything done.

The second closed an hour early for some reason (2:10 when the sign said 3:00).

The third stopped selling bows, and said they got out of the business nearly a decade ago even though I found a whole aisle of archery supplies :crazy:

So I stopped by Sportsman's sense I had no luck at the pro shops, and I was able to find out my natural draw length is around 28", and I got to feel a few more bows in my hands.

I was surprised I couldn't draw the 70# pull. Felt like a little wuss, and hopefully it was just my technique :embarassed:

So now my question is this: would I regret getting something on the cheaper end to get started, or should I save and wait? Parker Buck Hunters seem to be getting pretty good reviews and feel decent in my ands. Being "ready to shoot straight from the box" is also a plus.

Again, thanks for the help, guys!

Usingmyrights
02-14-2009, 23:58
So I stopped by Sportsman's sense I had no luck at the pro shops, and I was able to find out my natural draw length is around 28", and I got to feel a few more bows in my hands.

I was surprised I couldn't draw the 70# pull. Felt like a little wuss, and hopefully it was just my technique :embarassed:

So now my question is this: would I regret getting something on the cheaper end to get started, or should I save and wait? Parker Buck Hunters seem to be getting pretty good reviews and feel decent in my ands. Being "ready to shoot straight from the box" is also a plus.

Again, thanks for the help, guys!

A few things. If you shoot a release that changes things with you're draw length. Normally about 1/2" from what I've seen. On the draw weight, as I mentioned earlier, bow/cam design has alot to do with how hard it is to pull back. I've pulled back 70s that felt like nothing. I've pulled back 70s that were hard to pull back. One thing to remember though when you draw, especially if you're going to hunt. Don't aim it up then bring it down on target. It is easier to draw this way, but its not proper and you'll probably spook the game. You should be able to hold the bow slightly down or leval and draw straight back.

As far as starting off entry level thats up to you. Alot ot bows will have two limb options (if not more) a 50-60lbs one and a 60-70s one. If you can handle the 60 and know that you want to shoot 70 eventually so that you'll have more speed/power when hunting then get the 60-70limbs and they can "grow" with you. If you think that you just want to stay at 60 and not go any higher then get the 50-60limbs. The reason why you get the 50-60limbs if you don't want to shoot above 60, is because bows do best when they're set at their peak. You'll get better performance out of 50-60limbs set at 60 than you would 60-70limbs set at 60. I hope this helps. Again, Archerytalk.com is a great place to go too. There's a company called Huntersfriend thats an online retailer. If you know you're drawlenght, drawweight you want etc. I'd recommend giving them a look. Thats where I got my bow from and I'm extremely happy with it. Even as a noob to bows I was right on target from the get go. They do the sighting in and everything for you. (you may have to do some fine tuning on the sights since everyone is different, but my setup was GTG for me)

noway
02-15-2009, 08:14
One more thing about draw lengths and more truer with traditional gear. DL can grew with time.

I started with a 55Lb martin when I moved from my training wheels to a recurve ;), I thought my draw length was right at 29". As I drew that bow more and more and started to build upper strength, I found out the back of my broadheads was hitting my riser , due to I cut my arrows probably at a simple 30" inches of length.

later on with tape and marker and then the bow shop, I found out my draw length grew by about 1" and I now draw easily over 30" when coming to the same anchor on my face with the same bow. I believe looking back, my bow hand was probably not out and constant and I was floating my hand.

I experience this same thing when starting out as a novice with the single cam compound bow, but not as bad. As you get more stronger, and consistent, your draw length might grow on you.

You have to start right off with maintaining constant anchoring methods. And shooting a bow regularly helps in get this down pat. At one time I was doing about 50 shots on the weekend with my current gear, but I have to admit I haven't been sticky to that routine.

Bow hunters some times falls into the same rut like riflemen and pull the bow out 2 weeks before the season run down to the range ( if they even do that ) and or shop and get some new arrows ,BHs, tighten a screw or two and then go hunting.

Currently I shoot a 60" 60lb bear recurve and love it ;)

just my 2cts