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-   -   What have you done health-wise this week? (http://glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1363070)

quake 08-15-2011 19:45

What have you done health-wise this week?
 
Thought for a thread, brought on by posts in several threads dealing with health and fitness. Like the main "what have you done this week" thread, but kept more to fitness, health, and wellness issues. New workouts started, goals reached (marathons run, new personal-best in some category, etc), preventive steps taken (dental work, lasik, appendectomies, whatever). The idea is to back away somewhat from the "tactical" and gear-oriented things that are the most fun to discuss and end up getting the most bandwidth.


To start it off - in the last two weeks we've added a Total Gym and a speed bag in the shop. We already had a heavy bag and weights, and the honest fact is that while I've lifted weights for quite a while, I can't claim to be genuinely "in really good shape". I'm strong, but lacking in cardio; which goes right to a couple of the most likely threats I personally face - heart problems and/or stroke. I've really taken to the total gym for ab & cardio work; my sons make fun of me because I don't incline it as steep as they do, but I want to build up reps rather than plain strength at this point. They're young (one's not even in his 20's yet), so let them build their muscles. I've accepted that I'll never be a greyhound; just not possible with the genetic makeup that I (and my sons) have, but while I've got the same 50-inch chest I've had for a quarter-century or so, I'm getting darn tired of not having my 36" waist anymore and want it back. I had it for 30+ years and lost it just a few years ago; and it's my own fault & my own doing. I've passed the point of "wanting" it back and "wishing" I had it back; I've finally "decided" I'm getting it back.


So, what have you done this week to make yourself a better, healthier, more capable prepper...?

Newcop761 08-15-2011 20:03

Not exactly an improvement...I got food poisoning at the county fair. The wife and kids didn't. I treated myself with liquids, the BRAT diet, and some Lomotil. Still this knocked me on my back for a day.

arabianights 08-15-2011 20:49

i went to gym today and did 20 minutes on elliptical trainer

Bolster 08-15-2011 20:58

A good thread idea. I'm doing 35m on the orbital, about 5 days a week. Alternate days stretching or lifting. Just read at my age I'm not supposed to lift every other day anymore. :crying:

TangoFoxtrot 08-16-2011 02:43

Q: What have you done health-wise this week?

What I do almost everyday stretch , light lifting, and some cardio.

freedom790 08-16-2011 03:27

Ran a Susan G Komen 5k a couple days ago. Finished 215 out of 2000+ runners. Not my fastest time, but under the circumstances I was satisfied.

BobbyT 08-16-2011 04:27

- 15 min warmup on the stationary bike, where I fell just shy of my 5 mile goal
- cycled through all my "push" workouts on weights
- couple hundred hits on the heavy bag to drain whatever energy was left in my arms

Tomorrow it'll be:
- 15 min warmup on the elliptical, shooting for 2.4 miles
- cycle through all the "pull" workouts on weights
- couple hundred hits on the heavy bag to drain whatever energy is left in my arms

Maine1 08-16-2011 05:28

ran 2.6 miles one day.
ran sprints the next.
weights yesterday.
running again tomorrow.

SPIN2010 08-16-2011 05:40

Thirty five miles on the mountain bicycle and eight miles on the hoof, alternating days. I also now walk about seven miles a day a work (new job).

bdcochran 08-16-2011 06:50

1. had a cancer removed two weeks ago.
2. spent 9-12 and 2-5:30 in the dental chair one day last week
3. made next Monday appointment for dentist and gastro inspection.

Other than that, I still do aerobics, 1 hour of weightlifting every day. I also am taking 4 dance classes a week.

UtahBen 08-16-2011 08:21

I have been doing daily walks on some of the mountain trails around here, usually 3-5 miles, 5 days a week. We have also been eating tons of vegetables and fruits with all the gardens producing well. It has made me feel much better and I have been much less stressed about all the bad news the media has been putting out as of late.

dissthis 08-16-2011 13:50

I do CrossFit 5-6 days a week...training for the "unknown and the unknowable"...check out www.crossfit.com for more info...

Basically CrossFit is circuit training as well as Olympic lifts...rope/wall climbs, moving large loads over distances quickly...body weight exercises, running, running carrying irregular objects...

All the above is great conditioning especially for a crisis...

mac66 08-16-2011 15:08

I'm up to 25 miles every other day on my bicycle. I am the fastest 280lb fat guy in town. I used to be the fastest 300lb fat guy but "ride more, weigh less" seems to be working. I go to the gym on days I don't ride.

Akita 08-16-2011 15:58

Quote:

Originally Posted by TangoFoxtrot (Post 17783269)
Q: What have you done health-wise this week?

What I do almost everyday stretch , light lifting, and some cardio.

Same here.

mes228 08-17-2011 05:05

Health
 
Physical fitness and "Health" are not the same thing. They have almost no connection. What you see in America today is a very un-healthy media manipulation with physical fitness. A huge proportion of physical fitness buffs will be impotent, sick, broken men in a very few years. I know people that can run miles, study Krav Maga (spelling) and martial arts, lift weights and work their butt off to have a six pack. Every one, is as unhealthy as the limpest noodle couch potato imaginable. Physical fitness and health are connected in only the smallest of ways. The joke is on the American people. Just my opinion but it is based on real life experience.

cyrsequipment 08-17-2011 05:50

Quote:

Originally Posted by mes228 (Post 17788118)
Physical fitness and "Health" are not the same thing. They have almost no connection. What you see in America today is a very un-healthy media manipulation with physical fitness. A huge proportion of physical fitness buffs will be impotent, sick, broken men in a very few years. I know people that can run miles, study Krav Maga (spelling) and martial arts, lift weights and work their butt off to have a six pack. Every one, is as unhealthy as the limpest noodle couch potato imaginable. Physical fitness and health are connected in only the smallest of ways. The joke is on the American people. Just my opinion but it is based on real life experience.

I understand what you are getting at with your comment, but I think you have taken your theory a bit too far in the opposite direction as the common perception.

Many people are only looking for the "result" of fitness and the appearance of health. So they neglect what it takes to truely get there. But in order to get there (and maintain it once you are there) some attention has to be paid to real health. Once someone gets serious about fitness, they are usually exposed to proper nutrition and lifestyle and a good percentage take those lessons seriously.

Nutrition and general health do require as much maintainence as 6-pack abs (not that I would know about the 6-pack abs part :crying: ) so I am sure that you are correct that some people only worry about how they look. I'm also sure that many peole do go beyond the "looks" and at least pay equal attention to real health along with their appearance.

Dexters 08-17-2011 06:16

Quote:

Originally Posted by quake (Post 17782137)
So, what have you done this week to make yourself a better, healthier, more capable prepper...?

I exercise regularly - bike 50 miles about 3x a week or I'm hiking and doing some weights (but not regularly enough).

This is a great topic by the way. I think there is too much emphasis on things in S&P.

If SHTF being healthy and staying healthy will be the most important things. Being overweight puts stress on your body, can make some injuries more likely and just limits what you can do.

mes228 08-17-2011 07:31

Pt
 
It's not "theory" from my perspective. I've owned a health related company for many years (we own two businesses). Yes, my experience, does differ from the way media presents health. I suspect most everyone on this board has parents, or relatives that lived to be 80-90 years old - and never exercised a day in their life. As an aside go to any nursing home and one thing will be immediately obvious if you take notice. Is that the strapping, muscular, large man in his prior youth, probably isn't there. He's already long dead or very ill, or on oxygen over in the corner.

Where I really see dysfunction in males is the early age they become impotent. The premier Japanese porn star is 74 years old, I've read of a Russian that's even older. A growing number of Americans are impotent by about 50 or less. Especially the athletes. Why is this important? Because a healthy male is not impotent, or has little or no desire. The very first thing that poor overall health impacts is sex drive and ability. There seems to be no age that a healthy male automatically becomes impotent. You might be surprised what percent of males are taking pills for impotency at 40 or so. Yet many look to be the picture of health. We are a very unhealthy society. Gyms are full of people that are physically fit, yet unhealthy. I'm not against being physically fit. It's just a different thing than health, and it's just not a substitute for health.

Dexters 08-17-2011 08:07

Quote:

Originally Posted by mes228 (Post 17788488)
It's not "theory" from my perspective. I've owned a health related company for many years (we own two businesses). Yes, my experience, does differ from the way media presents health. I suspect most everyone on this board has parents, or relatives that lived to be 80-90 years old - and never exercised a day in their life. As an aside go to any nursing home and one thing will be immediately obvious if you take notice. Is that the strapping, muscular, large man in his prior youth, probably isn't there. He's already long dead or very ill, or on oxygen over in the corner.

Where I really see dysfunction in males is the early age they become impotent. The premier Japanese porn star is 74 years old, I've read of a Russian that's even older. A growing number of Americans are impotent by about 50 or less. Especially the athletes. Why is this important? Because a healthy male is not impotent, or has little or no desire. The very first thing that poor overall health impacts is sex drive and ability. There seems to be no age that a healthy male automatically becomes impotent. You might be surprised what percent of males are taking pills for impotency at 40 or so. Yet many look to be the picture of health. We are a very unhealthy society. Gyms are full of people that are physically fit, yet unhealthy. I'm not against being physically fit. It's just a different thing than health, and it's just not a substitute for health.

I'm not following you when you say a person can be fit yet unhealthy.

It would probably help me understand if you could tell me what you mean by a healthy person and what you recommend as a healthy lifestyle.

mes228 08-17-2011 08:42

Health
 
You can be physically fit ie muscular, and able to do feats of strength. Even have endurance in a physical realm ie bike races, running marathons etc. Yet be unhealthy. You can have clogged arteries, poorly functioning organs ie liver, kidneys, adrenalin systems, nervous systems, etc.etc. yet be "strong" Muscular strength, even endurance, is not the same as "health". My definition of health is the ability to live a long life. Free from disease and debilitating illness. With the ability to live a relatively painless life as you age ie joints etc. And retain the ability to enjoy life and companionship with your wife into "old" age (ie 70 years +++).

A couple of questions will speak volumes for a mans over all health. Are you functioning sexually without chemicals and adjuncts ? Generally speaking, if they have a partner healthy men are romantic several times a week, not once a month. Do you still have desire for intimacy? If the answer is a truthful "yes". Congratulations - you are probably overall a healthy man.

Also as an aside for the ladies that think running five miles a day and lifting weights, biathlons, triathlons etc. are good for them as women. Find someone that's older and has "been there and done that and has the tee shirt". They will probably look like a a wrinkled elderly prune (though slender (grin). Because nothing ages the skin as much as oxygen intake. The more oxygen you intake, the more your skin ages and wrinkles. If you wish a beautiful, wrinkle free, young for your age, appearance don't go there. The rewards of exercise certainly are not in aging or appearance.

quake 08-17-2011 09:45

Quote:

Originally Posted by mes228 (Post 17788746)
You can be physically fit ie muscular, and able to do feats of strength. Even have endurance in a physical realm ie bike races, running marathons etc. Yet be unhealthy. You can have clogged arteries, poorly functioning organs ie liver, kidneys, adrenalin systems, nervous systems, etc.etc. yet be "strong" Muscular strength, even endurance, is not the same as "health". My definition of health is the ability to live a long life. Free from disease and debilitating illness. With the ability to live a relatively painless life as you age ie joints etc. And retain the ability to enjoy life and companionship with your wife into "old" age (ie 70 years +++).

A couple of questions will speak volumes for a mans over all health. Are you functioning sexually without chemicals and adjuncts ? Generally speaking, if they have a partner healthy men are romantic several times a week, not once a month. Do you still have desire for intimacy? If the answer is a truthful "yes". Congratulations - you are probably overall a healthy man.

Also as an aside for the ladies that think running five miles a day and lifting weights, biathlons, triathlons etc. are good for them as women. Find someone that's older and has "been there and done that and has the tee shirt". They will probably look like a a wrinkled elderly prune (though slender (grin). Because nothing ages the skin as much as oxygen intake. The more oxygen you intake, the more your skin ages and wrinkles. If you wish a beautiful, wrinkle free, young for your age, appearance don't go there. The rewards of exercise certainly are not in aging or appearance.

Very strongly agree with all the above; to me it boils down to the fact that we tend to look at reversing symptoms instead of treating causes.

Fat & sedentary? Take a stimulant pill.
Impotent 30 years early? Take a boner pill.
Back hurts chronically? Take a pain-blocking pill.

None of those solves the cause, they just try to reverse the symptom. The best analogy I've heard for people who regularly take otc pain drugs like tylenol & such (and I mean regularly as a part of life; not someone who injured themselves yesterday), is that it's like cutting the wire that goes to the "check engine" light in your car because as we all know, that light shouldn't be constantly on. Made the symptom go away, but didn't do a thing to address the real issue, and we're still truckin on with the same problem but now we can blissfully ignore it.


Quote:

Originally Posted by mes228
Physical fitness and "Health" are not the same thing. They have almost no connection. What you see in America today is a very un-healthy media manipulation with physical fitness. A huge proportion of physical fitness buffs will be impotent, sick, broken men in a very few years. I know people that can run miles, study Krav Maga (spelling) and martial arts, lift weights and work their butt off to have a six pack. Every one, is as unhealthy as the limpest noodle couch potato imaginable. Physical fitness and health are connected in only the smallest of ways. The joke is on the American people. Just my opinion but it is based on real life experience.

I also largely agree with you on health & fitness not being synonymous; including the "overdoers" of the fitness thing with things up to and including steroids & drugs, being ruined in short order. Moving toward a worthy-sounding goal the wrong way can do more harm than good. Losing weight would be a good idea for many (probably most) americans; but losing weight isn't inherently a good or healthy thing in and of itself - crack & heroin addicts lose weight. I do think there's a lot of overlap between the areas of health & fitness even in cases of unintentional cause & effect. Quitting smoking is one example imo - it's definitely good for you health-wise, but it also greatly contributes to better fitness as well.

Not sure how to say it properly, but I tend to see the overdoers and under-doers of the 'fitness' aspect (whether it's the hulks who poison themselves with steroids, the string-beans who starve their bodies of proteins, or the Jabba's who gorge their bodies with sugars) as being two examples of the same problem - lack of balance, and often lack of knowledge as well. The overdoers tend to focus on the appearance and/or psychological gratification of the next accomplishment rather than on their health; and the under-doers focus on either physical gratification or else focus on nothing at all and just "let themselves go" without any intentional thought about it at all.

Fwiw, one of the most-missed things imo in our society health-wise is nutrients & trace nutrients. I may have said it here before, but I see food overall as the fuel in our tank, but it's the trace nutrients that serve as the spark plug to accomplish something with that fuel; and we as a society aren't getting near the nutrients we used to. Even non-processed foods today have fewer nutrients in them than the same foods did a few decades ago, and it's (imo) largely due to our treating the soil the way the fitness overdoers treat their bodies - pushing for visible affirmation without regard to the core benefit - with nitrate- and chemical-based fertilizers. Not knocking farmers; I grew up on a family farm, and they're just responding to demand the way any business does, but the fact is that many nutrients (especially trace minerals) are lower in density in our current crops than they were 20, 40, or 60 years ago. Examples of what I'm getting at:

http://www.suite101.com/content/decl...tables-a153662

Quote:

...
Representative changes in nutrients from foods grown in 1999 versus those grown in 1950 include:

•A 38% decrease in riboflavin
•A 15% decrease in ascorbic acid
•A 16% decrease in calcium
•A 9% decrease in phosphorus
•A 15% decrease in iron
•A 6% decrease in protein content
•A slight increase (0.6%) in water content
•There were no statistically significant differences in vitamin A, thiamin, niacin, fat, or carbohydrate content

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/37396355...ies-dwindling/


http://www.agricultureinformation.co...nutrients.html

I'm not panicking about it the way some are, but I suspect a lot of folks aren't aware of it. I just try to allow for it, with colloidal minerals, couple tablespoons a day of blackstrap molasses (for iron - my family tends to run deficient), simple things like that, that help make a difference.

All this long ramble is just my attempt to say that there's a lot to it, and there's a lot we can do to tune up and maintain our primary vehicle - our body - if we'll take a little time to just think about it, learn about it, and just do it (so to speak :supergrin: ); but many don't want to be bothered with it. One thing that has stuck with me for a long time was (of all things) a tv commercial from the 70's. It was Cher; don't recall what she was promoting - probably weight watchers, jenny craig, etc - but it was during all the opec/shortage/gas-rationing nonsense going on back then, and she made the comment that "people pay more attention to what they put into their car's gas tank, than what they put into their bodies". Simple as it was, that simple line has stuck with me all this time, and it's still nearly as true now as it was back then.

mes228 08-17-2011 10:38

Health
 
Much of the current drive to physical fitness stems from the obesity of our peoples. In my opinion it's darn hard to really become excessively "fat" if if you eat "real" foods. Doesn't matter how much you eat. By real food I'm speaking of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, meats. It's the processed stuff that produces obesity in the overwhelming majority of cases. Real food has a balance of fiber content.

So in general it's very hard to eat enough beans, peas, spinach, real whole grain bread to, etc. to become really excessively fat. The fiber prevents it. I personally feel Americans are maybe getting 1/10 the fiber they really need to be healthy in their diets. And I'm not talking "cellulose" added in fake bread & food products (read that on the label as "added saw dust" which has increased about 50% in the last year or so). I agree 100% with the statement on trace minerals etc. So I suggest a diet of a variety of foods that will spoil - just consume them before they spoil. Avoid as much processed, packaged foods as possible. Way too much refined sugar too.

One more thing and I'll shut up. Americans eat too little real "fat" and way too much fake fat. Avoid anything "hydrogenated" or modern man made concoctions. Real fat is good for you and should be about 30% of the calories you consume. Real butter, real oils, even real "lard" is way better than some of the synthetic concoctions scientist have cooked up. If it's not been consumed for at least a few thousands of years stay away from it. Overall if it's a "real" natural product your body can handle it ie use it or eliminate it. That's just not the case for artificial things.

Kieller 08-17-2011 11:17

Interesting points you bring up mes228. I never thought of there being a difference between healthy and fit yet I think you hit the nail in the head.

As far as being fit this week, I am continuing to take martial arts classes with the wife which is a great workout.

As for being healthy, we have been eating as much fruit and veggies as we can, some of them coming from our own garden. We are also trimming down the number of times we eat out every week. Saves $$$ and is much more healthy since we typically cook with non-processed foods.

Good thread Quake!

quake 08-17-2011 11:21

Quote:

Originally Posted by mes228 (Post 17789224)
...One more thing and I'll shut up. Americans eat too little real "fat" and way too much fake fat.

Don't shut up; preach it brother... :cool:

Ever see a fat person with Parkinson's? I haven't. The brain is largely made of fat, and to deprive the brain of fats is akin to depriving the muscles of protein. Muscles need protein, and the brain needs fat. After my father in law had a quadruple bypass, he laid off all fats almost completely for 8-10 months - the doctor told him to, and doctor knows best. :upeyes: He gradually got dumber-&-slower and dumber-&-slower as time went on; to the point where he finally couldn't deny it himself anymore, did a little research and started doing exactly as you say - taking in natural fats and just avoiding the saturated and hydrogenized stuff. One of the long-term problems of many mountain men and pioneers was lack of fat in the diet. Wild rabbits, deer, and jerked meat just don't provide what the body needs in the way of fats; that's why the more "round" animals were so prized for food.


From the Health Sciences Institute: http://hsionline.com/2005/07/14/diet...-parkinsons-2/
Quote:

The data revealed a significant link between a reduced risk of Parkinson’s and the highest intake of total fat, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs).
Ok.. off the soapbox now and back to work for me... :embarassed:

Dexters 08-17-2011 14:24

Quote:

Originally Posted by mes228 (Post 17788746)
You can be physically fit ie muscular, and able to do feats of strength. Even have endurance in a physical realm ie bike races, running marathons etc. Yet be unhealthy. You can have clogged arteries, poorly functioning organs ie liver, kidneys, adrenalin systems, nervous systems, etc.etc. yet be "strong" Muscular strength, even endurance, is not the same as "health". My definition of health is the ability to live a long life. Free from disease and debilitating illness. With the ability to live a relatively painless life as you age ie joints etc. And retain the ability to enjoy life and companionship with your wife into "old" age (ie 70 years +++).

A couple of questions will speak volumes for a mans over all health. Are you functioning sexually without chemicals and adjuncts ? Generally speaking, if they have a partner healthy men are romantic several times a week, not once a month. Do you still have desire for intimacy? If the answer is a truthful "yes". Congratulations - you are probably overall a healthy man.

Also as an aside for the ladies that think running five miles a day and lifting weights, biathlons, triathlons etc. are good for them as women. Find someone that's older and has "been there and done that and has the tee shirt". They will probably look like a a wrinkled elderly prune (though slender (grin). Because nothing ages the skin as much as oxygen intake. The more oxygen you intake, the more your skin ages and wrinkles. If you wish a beautiful, wrinkle free, young for your age, appearance don't go there. The rewards of exercise certainly are not in aging or appearance.

Thanks for taking the time to reply. I appreciate it and agree with what you say.


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