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-   -   trigger job gone bad (http://glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1446509)

d123gaw 10-06-2012 15:49

trigger job gone bad
 
OK. Don't b**** at me I knew I might screw up when I did it. I polished my trigger bar a little too much and now my gun goes bang when i pull the trigger and bang when I RELEASE the trigger. (a good double tap). But it did scare me a bit at first. I'm going to order a new trigger bar with a smooth trigger and start again.

Butch 10-06-2012 16:56

Yup, ya round off the edges of these two just a little and that's what happens. A new trigger bar may fix it, but a new firing pin is a good idea too.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/06...triggerbar.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/06...engagement.jpg

Remington 870 10-06-2012 17:41

all you needed is fltz polish and a rag or q tip. polish till the parts are shiny and re-assemble. I polish all the parts that have metal to metal contact. this improves the feel of the trigger a ton! hope this helps. ps you dont need any power tools at all.

seanmac45 10-06-2012 17:52

And the dremel tool strikes again..................

d123gaw 10-06-2012 18:05

seanmac45 where did that Hemmingway quote come from?
I've seen it before but never knew it's origin.

1-2man 10-06-2012 18:05

I polish my internals at the range. 1,000 or so rounds seem to do the trick. ;)

seanmac45 10-06-2012 18:22

Quote:

Originally Posted by d123gaw (Post 19492066)
seanmac45 where did that Hemmingway quote come from?
I've seen it before but never knew it's origin.


The source of the quote;

Certainly there is no hunting like the hunting of man and those who have hunted armed men long enough and liked it, never really care for anything else thereafter.
Ernest Hemingway, "On the Blue Water," Esquire, April 1936
US author & journalist (1899 - 1961)

I use it because it was the motto of the NYPD Citywide Anti-Crime team prior to it being disbanded.

It sums up my feelings about retirement perfectly.

dakrat 10-06-2012 18:42

this will give you the edge in competition shooting. you will give Bob Vogel a run for his money.

SJ 40 10-06-2012 18:56

Quote:

Originally Posted by seanmac45 (Post 19492021)
And the dremel tool strikes again..................

Dremel,The gun smiths best friend and money maker. SJ 40

Arc Angel 10-06-2012 19:29

There is ABSOLUTELY nothing wrong with using a Dremel Tool to do an action polish job with. (Every gunsmith I've ever known - and I've known a few - used both fine India stones, and a Dremel-like power tool for his trigger jobs.) In fact I consider using Flitz and a Q-Tip to be a complete waste of time for any, 'quality' Glock trigger job.

The real mistake the OP made is that he didn't stay away from the edges! NEVER TOUCH AN EDGE WITH A DREMEL TOOL. Too bad because while a ruined trigger bar ain't no big deal, Glock firing pins are really expensive!

Next time, work barehanded so you can gauge heat buildup in the piece. Don't, 'touchdown' for more than 5 or 6 seconds at a time; and STAY AWAY FROM THE COMPONENT EDGES.

SJ 40 10-06-2012 19:56

Quote:

Originally Posted by Arc Angel (Post 19492331)
There is ABSOLUTELY nothing wrong with using a Dremel Tool to do an action polish job with. (Every gunsmith I've ever known - and I've known a few - used both fine India stones, and a Dremel-like power tool for his trigger jobs.) In fact I consider using Flitz and a Q-Tip to be a complete waste of time for any, 'quality' Glock trigger job.

The real mistake the OP made is that he didn't stay away from the edges! NEVER TOUCH AN EDGE WITH A DREMEL TOOL. Too bad because while a ruined trigger bar ain't no big deal, Glock firing pins are really expensive!

Next time, work barehanded so you can gauge heat buildup in the piece. Don't, 'touchdown' for more than 5 or 6 seconds at a time; and STAY AWAY FROM THE COMPONENT EDGES.

Like you said the key is where and how much.
I know a Ret. N. G. armor that does 1911 trigger jobs with out a jig,nice and crisp every time,where and how much is the key. SJ 40

M 7 10-06-2012 22:32

Quote:

Originally Posted by d123gaw (Post 19491587)
OK. Don't b**** at me I knew I might screw up when I did it. I polished my trigger bar a little too much and now my gun goes bang when i pull the trigger and bang when I RELEASE the trigger. (a good double tap). But it did scare me a bit at first. I'm going to order a new trigger bar with a smooth trigger and start again.

At least the new parts aren't very expensive and can be had readily. :dunno:

Bruce M 10-06-2012 22:33

Quote:

Originally Posted by dakrat (Post 19492184)
this will give you the edge in competition shooting. you will give Bob Vogel a run for his money.

:rofl::rofl:

jb1911 10-07-2012 06:15

Quote:

Originally Posted by Arc Angel (Post 19492331)
There is ABSOLUTELY nothing wrong with using a Dremel Tool to do an action polish job with. (Every gunsmith I've ever known - and I've known a few - used both fine India stones, and a Dremel-like power tool for his trigger jobs.) In fact I consider using Flitz and a Q-Tip to be a complete waste of time for any, 'quality' Glock trigger job.

The real mistake the OP made is that he didn't stay away from the edges! NEVER TOUCH AN EDGE WITH A DREMEL TOOL. Too bad because while a ruined trigger bar ain't no big deal, Glock firing pins are really expensive!

Next time, work barehanded so you can gauge heat buildup in the piece. Don't, 'touchdown' for more than 5 or 6 seconds at a time; and STAY AWAY FROM THE COMPONENT EDGES.

:agree:

lethal tupperwa 10-07-2012 07:29

Arc,

You give do it yourselfers that ( don't have a clue)

benifit of the doubt (that they have the experience and attention to detail that you do)

just don't let them fix anything for you.

ca survivor 10-07-2012 09:08

Quote:

Originally Posted by seanmac45 (Post 19492021)
And the dremel tool strikes again..................

:rofl::rofl:

Mochahooligan 10-07-2012 09:14

Quote:

Originally Posted by 1-2man (Post 19492067)
I polish my internals at the range. 1,000 or so rounds seem to do the trick. ;)

This is the ONLY way I polish the internals too! Funny I thought I was the only one that did this????

Noponer 10-07-2012 12:03

As Arc Angel says, be careful with the component edges.... or, at least, be very careful to not round them.

If the edges of the trigger bar and/or the connector (where they meet) are rounded too much, the bar will drop downward at the time of trigger reset (instead of the bar moving only sideways as designed). This can cause the "sear" of the bar to move down away from the "nose" (or "lug") of the firing pin, releasing it. BANG!

If you have plenty of sear/nose engagement (2/3 or more recommended by Glock & as Butch's sketch in post #2 above shows), the chances of this are reduced - but if the overlap is not large, firing on release of the trigger can happen. Many of the Glocks I have owned have only had about 1/2 engagement... from the factory.

Arc Angel 10-10-2012 16:33

Quote:

Originally Posted by lethal tupperwa (Post 19493282)
Arc,

You give do it yourselfers that ( don't have a clue) benifit of the doubt (that they have the experience and attention to detail that you do)

just don't let them fix anything for you.

Lethal, I can't argue with that; but, let's be perfectly honest: Half the fun of owning a Glock is, ....... :supergrin:

d123gaw 10-15-2012 23:42

New trigger bar and new G.R. 3.5lb connector and the gun fires better than before. I really like the smooth face trigger.

pm666 10-21-2012 21:10

Can one round the edges/lose the angles by using Flitz without a Dremel?

I would really like to smooth out the trigger a little, but I don't need/want what the OP wound up with.

janice6 10-21-2012 21:21

Quote:

Originally Posted by pm666 (Post 19542053)
Can one round the edges/lose the angles by using Flitz without a Dremel?

I would really like to smooth out the trigger a little, but I don't need/want what the OP wound up with.


If I were to polish any of my gun parts, I would apply the Fitz with my finger, to the surface of a small block of wood. Then take the part and lay each surface flat on the wood, while "lapping" it. Keep the part flat against the block to hold the surface flat, and the edges get no treatment at all.

This techneque when used with "polishing compound" works very well to sharpen wood tools without rounding the edges.

NEOH212 10-21-2012 23:04

I've found that polishing the internals on a Glock yields little difference in most cases. The only time it's really noticeable is when the internals are really rough from tool marks or the like.

All you need to do the polishing is some fine polish and q-tips. In extreme cases, some 2,000 grit sand paper and honing oil works great.

The area of the trigger bar that the OP polished is the one area that I stay away from. It's a good measure of safety. In all the Glocks I've had apart, the interface between the striker and trigger bar is usually shiny and smooth with in a few range sessions and no amount of polishing is going to make it any smoother than it already is when it's like that.

The OP will be ok with a new trigger bar. He might also want to get the orange slide cover from Glock to inspect the area in question BEFORE he takes the gun to the range. There should be no less than 2/3 contact between the trigger bar and striker.

NEOH212 10-21-2012 23:07

If one must polish that area in question, your better off with a extra fine stone and magnifiers to monitor your work. Go slow and check your work often.

Doing it free hand without taking some kind of measure to keep your angles consistent is asking for trouble.

owl6roll 10-22-2012 07:14

Huumm....CLP works best.


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