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Old 02-09-2013, 12:00   #13
Specialized
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arc Angel View Post
You should be aware that a so-called, '3.5#' connector actually produces a trigger pull at, or above, 4.5#'s.
I had read this in a few different places, makes sense. Though I have seen some 9mm 17's and 19's that had very nice 3lb triggers, I know that the 10mm's and .45's need heavier FP springs to be reliable, which increases trigger pull weight.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arc Angel View Post
The standard coil spring should be installed in the shape of an, 'S' and not a, 'Z' when the trigger mechanism is viewed from the right-hand side with the trigger in your right-hand, and the THU in your left-hand.
I had seen this on the videos and followed it carefully. What I don't know is what happens if you get it backwards -- what's the effect of that?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arc Angel View Post
Personally I've had the best results using Wolff Gunsprings throughout my Glocks. I use 6# striker AND trigger springs.
You're the second person to mention this -- I'm going to order some Wolff springs and see what differences they make. Thanks for the tip.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arc Angel View Post
Make sure you polish your striker (FP) safety and firing pin well. As for myself? I strongly recommend that you do NOT use reduced weight springs in an EDC Glock.
I agree, based on what I've heard that doing so can do to reliability. And I carry this G36 most of the time.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arc Angel View Post
LEAVE THE GLOCK TRIGGER BAR, 'KICK-PLATE' AND STRIKER LUG CONFIGURATION ALONE. Even a little bit of fooling around with it (polishing) can make your Glock highly unstable and prone to, 'ND'.
That would be a bad thing. Thanks for all the great tips, I really appreciate it!
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