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Old 03-05-2012, 15:09   #1
Falcon5269
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Polishing my glock trigger parts?

What is your reccomendation for a product to use on polishing my trigger assembly parts? I have a Dremmel.
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Old 03-05-2012, 15:23   #2
Keyhole
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Use Flitz with the Dremel.
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Old 03-05-2012, 15:26   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keyhole View Post
Use Flitz with the Dremel.
Thanks Keyhole!
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Old 03-06-2012, 17:28   #4
Falcon5269
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3.5 # connector

Quote:
Originally Posted by Keyhole View Post
Use Flitz with the Dremel.
Do you have a pref for 3.5# connectors. Want to polish up my G23 Gen2 and drop a 3.5# connector in.

I have a Ghost 3.5# in my G36 and it made a difference. I want to polish the G36 as well.

Appreciate ur input.
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Old 03-07-2012, 00:44   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Falcon5269 View Post
Do you have a pref for 3.5# connectors. Want to polish up my G23 Gen2 and drop a 3.5# connector in.

I have a Ghost 3.5# in my G36 and it made a difference. I want to polish the G36 as well.

Appreciate ur input.
The ghost rocket connector is the best, hands down, in my opinion. Spend the time with a file and a flashlight, and it will all but eliminate over-travel. You don't even need the orange back plate, just cover your striker tube with your finger, and inspect your dis-connector. I did the ramped style cut, finish, and polish on my 26. My take-up is long, and light. When I reach my trigger point, it's very short, smooth, and has a very satisfying click with no back-travel. Once you take up the 3/8 or so, the trigger is reminiscent of my 1911.
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Old 03-09-2012, 15:32   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Falcon5269 View Post
Do you have a pref for 3.5# connectors. Want to polish up my G23 Gen2 and drop a 3.5# connector in.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Falcon5269 View Post

I have a Ghost 3.5# in my G36 and it made a difference. I want to polish the G36 as well.

Appreciate ur input.


Just a thought--for self-defense guns I like the minus connector (3.5) with an NY trigger spring. This gives a much crisper trigger pull without the sproing of the factory trigger, yet leaves the weight the same. If you are not carrying or using this pistol for self-defense and want a lighter trigger pull this won't be for you, but in my opinion the factory pull weight is ideal for a self-defense pistol.

Editorializing here, I think many shooters are overly obsessed with too-light of triggers, whether Glocks or any other pistol, and unless you've been in a tense situation with a gun in your hand you might not have considered the liability of a trigger under 5-6 pounds. Adrenalin changes us physically and especially with our Glocks--which is all I carry--we don't need competition weight triggers when our body dumps all that adrenalin into our system. Editorializing over.
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Old 03-09-2012, 20:35   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkF View Post

Just a thought--for self-defense guns I like the minus connector (3.5) with an NY trigger spring. This gives a much crisper trigger pull without the sproing of the factory trigger, yet leaves the weight the same. If you are not carrying or using this pistol for self-defense and want a lighter trigger pull this won't be for you, but in my opinion the factory pull weight is ideal for a self-defense pistol.

Editorializing here, I think many shooters are overly obsessed with too-light of triggers, whether Glocks or any other pistol, and unless you've been in a tense situation with a gun in your hand you might not have considered the liability of a trigger under 5-6 pounds. Adrenalin changes us physically and especially with our Glocks--which is all I carry--we don't need competition weight triggers when our body dumps all that adrenalin into our system. Editorializing over.
I welcome respectful input from everybody. I agree that I don't need or want a comp trigger. Just to "clean it up" a little. I have been in too many tense situations with a gun in my hand to remember. (All legal) There is no substitute for training and tactics. Thank you. Good insight.
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Old 03-10-2012, 09:16   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkF View Post
Just a thought--for self-defense guns I like the minus connector (3.5) with an NY trigger spring. This gives a much crisper trigger pull without the sproing of the factory trigger, yet leaves the weight the same. If you are not carrying or using this pistol for self-defense and want a lighter trigger pull this won't be for you, but in my opinion the factory pull weight is ideal for a self-defense pistol.
Now, ya see! This is what makes the world go round. Personally, I hate the feel of an NY trigger's phony double-action pull. Why? Because I've learned how to correctly fire my Glock from the trigger's normal reset position.

I tend to fire multiple shots, and in quick bursts, too. With or without an NY spring, an NY trigger does absolutely nothing for me. In fact because I'm not able to watch the front sight as easily my split times increase, and I have to slow down in order to maintain accuracy.

Does an NY trigger give a more, 'crisp' trigger pull? That would depend upon, 'How' a shooter pulls the trigger. One thing's for sure, though: I've never had a Glock trigger go, 'sproing' when it was fired from its correct reset position. So, what’s really being considered, here, is how the very first shot is fired - NOT how subsequent shots are let off.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkF View Post
Editorializing here, I think many shooters are overly obsessed with too-light of triggers, whether Glocks or any other pistol, and unless you've been in a tense situation with a gun in your hand you might not have considered the liability of a trigger under 5-6 pounds. Adrenalin changes us physically and especially with our Glocks--which is all I carry--we don't need competition weight triggers when our body dumps all that adrenalin into our system. Editorializing over.
OK, I'm not picking on you, Mark. (My son's name, too!) However, because I don't want any adversarial lawyer reading this thread to go into orgasm, I think we need to qualify the term, 'light trigger'.

Glock connectors that are advertised and sold as, '3.5# connectors' are not really 3.5# connectors. This description is the result of an old Glock advertising faux pas. The truth is that the lightest Glock connector the factory produces is actually a, '4.5# connector' - One that still does NOT produce an actual 4.5# trigger pull without significant changes, also, being made to the springs as well.

(Changes which I, personally, would never make because of the reliability problems that are often concomitant to such modifications. Why certain aftermarket parts suppliers sell trigger kits in order to accomplish this remains a mystery to me? There’s, ‘one’ born every minute, though, huh!)

The trigger pull on a Glock is NOT dependent upon the addition of only a, 'lighter' connector. The actual trigger pull on a Glock is always cumulative; and is a final result of the interaction among all three springs AND the connector.

It seems to me that too many shooters want to run their Glock triggers down to a 4.5#, or less, cumulative trigger pull without any real appreciation for the fact that Glock pistols use a pre-tensioned striker system. Sure, a 3.5# trigger might be OK to use on a 1911 pattern self-defense pistol; but, it's not all right to use a trigger with less than a cumulative 4.5# trigger pull on a similar self-defense Glock.

(I’ll be perfectly honest with you: I don’t believe a cumulative trigger pull of 4.5#’s, or less, belongs on any pretensioned striker-fired pistol - None, including Glocks.)

Every time I read one of Massad Ayoob's articles on gun safety and civil liability I'm reminded that a sensible trigger pull is important - very important! Let's face it, any lawyer who knows how to correctly operate an electronic trigger pull gauge is really going to be able to, 'screw around' with your pistol in court.

Once you start to push down the 4.5# cumulative trigger pull envelope, you open yourself up to all sort of legal, 'léger de main'. Where should the pull be measured from? The top, the middle, or the bottom of the trigger? Should you go by the overall cumulative trigger pull, or is the advertised connector pull weight a sufficient definition?

As a matter of fact I never even thought about the effects adrenaline might have on the act of pulling a trigger. (It's got to be there, though, right!) Nevertheless, I honestly do not believe the use of a 4.5# connector - by itself - causes any Glock pistol to be more dangerous to use during a self-defense event. If the spring weights are, also, lowered then, yes; but not if only the connector angle is lessened.

At the same time neither do I think that, 'the factory pull weight is ideal'. Right out of the box, new, Glock pistols have a long creepy and imprecise feel to them. In particular I especially dislike Glock’s long extended lock time; and, rather sadly, I have never been able to figure out a way to successfully reduce the lock time of a Glock action.

The other thing I don't like about going below a 4.5# cumulative trigger pull on a Glock is that - in spite of the fact there are people on this forum who do not believe it - a Glock trigger can be, 'stacked'. I assure you it can. (I've already stacked my own Glock triggers while I worked on an action! The first time this happened to me, wow, what a surprise that was!)

My own Glocks are all set up in exactly the same way: 4.5# connectors, standard weight recoil springs, and extra-heavy (6#) trigger and striker springs. (Standard striker safety spring weights too.) My cumulative trigger pulls - when measured from the center of the trigger face - run in a range between 4.8 and 5.4#'s. (Trigger pull measurements seldom reflect only one specific pull weight, and are actually a reflection of some sort of overall component range.)

Consequently me in the one direction, (down) and the NYPD in the other direction (up, way up!) each disagree that, 'the factory pull weight is ideal for a self-defense pistol'. In my own opinion the worst things about a standard Glock trigger pull are the overall perceived resistance, a subtle tendency for the mechanism to stack - Which is, I believe, now proven by the factory's recently modified and increased sear angle - and an incredibly long lock time.

I imagine that everyone who shoots a Glock would shoot better if the lock time were, somehow, cut by, say, half. (With the current lockwork design this ain't never going to happen!)

Last edited by Arc Angel; 03-10-2012 at 13:11..
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Old 03-10-2012, 11:37   #9
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Excellent gentlemen!! Great insight to the Glock! Thank you.

Isn't it a damn shame we have to live in fear of BS liability issues thanks to some screwed up lawyers and system. Its what I call the pendulum effect.... we go from the wild west to the "shoot em with pillows' mentality. CRAZY!!
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Old 03-09-2012, 15:34   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keyhole View Post
Use Flitz with the Dremel.


Flitz is a chemical polish and shines nicelt but doesn't do any smoothing. Dremel's own red jeweler's rouge actually cuts metal very finely and is a good choice whenused carefully.
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Old 03-09-2012, 20:12   #11
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Auto Rubbing compound works great.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkF View Post

Flitz is a chemical polish and shines nicelt but doesn't do any smoothing. Dremel's own red jeweler's rouge actually cuts metal very finely and is a good choice whenused carefully.
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Old 03-05-2012, 19:56   #12
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I used the dremel jeweler's polishing rouge.
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Old 03-07-2012, 05:49   #13
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Actually, I've had very good success using Lone Wolf's VERY springy 4.5# connector. It's difficult for me to imagine any better, '-' connector. (I back mine up with the LWD, 'Ultimate Trigger Stop'.)

http://www.lonewolfdist.com/Detail.a...TERM=Connector

http://www.lonewolfdist.com/Detail.a...0&TERM=Trigger Housing (Make sure you get the right caliber!)

Polishing products that can be used with good success in conjunction with a Dremel Tool. (Provided you KNOW HOW to use a Dremel.)

Simichrome Metal Polish: http://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&key...l_60m9rqnryk_b

Flitz Metal Polish: http://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&key...z+metal+polish

Mother's Mag Wheel & Aluminum Polish: http://www.autogeek.net/mo5101.html
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Old 03-07-2012, 08:42   #14
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Excellent info. Thanx! Already bought some Flitz polish. I know that the Dremel has more power than u think so I am going EASY!!
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Old 03-07-2012, 12:40   #15
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Run the Dremel between 2 and 3 thousand RPM. Learn to, 'hover' and, 'touch' different spots as you polish. Do NOT bear down hard with the tool. Do NOT stay on one spot for more than 10 to 15 seconds. Safety glasses are, also, a good idea!

Work barehanded; this way you'll be able to feel heat buildup in the part and know when to back-off. Warm metal is OK; metal that's too hot to hold comfortably is not. Metal polishing is a filthy business. I always put an old towel down before beginning; and I'll wear an old T-shirt, too. Apply the polish to the toolhead rather than to the part; this way you'll get a whole lot less spatter.

When you polish an edge (of anything) just touch it a few times - Nothing more. As you get better at polishing you'll be able to run at higher RPM's; but 2 to 3 thousand RPM should give you a real nice shine. When I do a Glock, I polish everything; many people - some of them on this board - have noticed the difference and complimented me on a job well done.

(I mean, heck, it ain't a Vanek or GlockWorx trigger; but it's, still, about as good as a basic factory trigger can get; and, when I'm done polishing, my Glock triggers really do operate with noticeable smoothness. So does the slide.)
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Old 03-07-2012, 17:43   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arc Angel View Post
Run the Dremel between 2 and 3 thousand RPM. Learn to, 'hover' and, 'touch' different spots as you polish. Do NOT bear down hard with the tool. Do NOT stay on one spot for more than 10 to 15 seconds. Safety glasses are, also, a good idea!

Work barehanded; this way you'll be able to feel heat buildup in the part and know when to back-off. Warm metal is OK; metal that's too hot to hold comfortably is not. Metal polishing is a filthy business. I always put an old towel down before beginning; and I'll wear an old T-shirt, too. Apply the polish to the toolhead rather than to the part; this way you'll get a whole lot less spatter.

When you polish an edge (of anything) just touch it a few times - Nothing more. As you get better at polishing you'll be able to run at higher RPM's; but 2 to 3 thousand RPM should give you a real nice shine. When I do a Glock, I polish everything; many people - some of them on this board - have noticed the difference and complimented me on a job well done.

(I mean, heck, it ain't a Vanek or GlockWorx trigger; but it's, still, about as good as a basic factory trigger can get; and, when I'm done polishing, my Glock triggers really do operate with noticeable smoothness. So does the slide.)
Thanks alot AA!! GREAT info. Folks on this forum have been a big help!!
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Old 03-07-2012, 19:12   #17
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Any metal or chrome polish will do, even automotive rubbing compound.
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Old 03-09-2012, 15:36   #18
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Any metal or chrome polish will do, even automotive rubbing compound.


Automotive rubbing compound is really too aggressive for trigger parts.
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Old 03-07-2012, 19:28   #19
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+1 from Falcon. Don't forget to check out a few YouTube videos first too.
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Old 03-12-2012, 18:36   #20
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I saw a youtube video recently where a guy was demonstrating how to do a Glock trigger job using flitz and q-tips and rags. It may take a little longer than a rotary tool with polishing buff, but I can say it actually does work, and it's a lot harder to screw up polishing by hand with a rag.
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