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Old 10-06-2007, 07:02   #51
917MDS
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The gift of fear is a great book. Points are illustrated with true stories instead of hypotheticals.
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Old 12-08-2007, 18:12   #52
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The Stand

Just finished Stephen King's book "The Stand". Amazing story of survival, good vs evil in a post apocalyptic world. There's a six hour mini-series that is supposed to be pretty good, actually written by Stephen King so it's true to the story. Gonna have to hunt it down somewhere.
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Old 12-20-2007, 00:29   #53
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The Stand is pretty good(at least parts of it are). Since Stephen King was involved in making it, they stuck pretty close to the book.
I just wish he had taken the time to write a better ending.
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Old 12-20-2007, 14:31   #54
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Ok. I am probably going to send some people over the edge with this one and end up getting flamed to death….but here goes….

I recently went back and re-read "Patriots" again... the first time there was something that nagged at me, but I couldn't put my finger on it... so I read it again. Still wasn't sure what it was, but now that some time has passed, I think I finally figured it out.

The story is fine and all... I enjoyed reading it. Don’t get me wrong; I have nothing against the author personally. However there is one aspect that overshadows the entire book in an almost subliminal way. That something is arrogance.

I know its “TEOTWAWKI” and all that, but the characters end up doing some things that really bother me. Further, I am even more bothered when I start to think that most (if not all) writers of fiction insinuate themselves and their thoughts and beliefs into their stories.

In the story, as I recall, after everyone is safely ensconced in their retreat, there are some incidents with people passing by. On more than one occasion they stop, detain, disarm, interrogate and pass judgment on others. Now supposedly these are solid, law-abiding, Christian people. Being the case, their religious beliefs should have stopped them from some the things they did. If they are true believers in the Constitution (which it would seem to indicate they are) then what they do flies in the very face of that document and what it stands for. Either way, they appear to be in direct conflict with their beliefs.

We even have a case where a couple of people are determined to be engaging in cannibalism, and one of the characters shoots them…. In my book that is murder. They are not empowered to be judge and jury. I know some will say, “but there was no law after SHTF!” My answer is “so what?” Whether cannibal, looter or any other despicable life form, (even just the mundanely ill-equipped) the characters decide who is “good” or “bad”.

Someone has a stash of watches on them? Looter. Kill him.

Just because someone has chosen to gather useless items after SHTF does not mean you have the right to punish him. *(If they were trying to loot from you, that is different of course since we would have caught them red-handed) Without witnesses, a trial or any other form of civilized structure, the characters have decided that their way is the “right” way. They have been magically endowed with the ability to know who deserves to live or die.

I do NOT advocate that they should have ignored the law-breakers. I do not say the “evil” people are right, should be running around free, or any other bleeding heart liberal ideology. But they did NOT have the right to do the things they did. Violating what is right to “fight evil” does not make it right.

Stopping people on the road as they pass by your land in the old days was how the elite upper class treated people. It’s no different in this case. For that matter, if there “is no law now” then by what right do they lay claim to the land they inhabit? Land deeds are only government documents recognizing a person’s exclusive right to use that piece of land. If the law is “gone”, so is the only entity that legally recognizes your “ownership”.

Putting the question of ownership aside, stopping people at the gate, having them move along, and even coercing them through a show of superior firepower are all acceptable means of protecting oneself. Unilaterally detaining, disarming and questioning people is WRONG. They become no better than the neighborhood bully who forces things to be done his way.

If you have read this far, thanks for hanging with me. To sum it up, while it is of course a work of fiction and characters often do things we don’t think should or would be done, that is not what finally bothered me the most about the story…. As I stated earlier, writers put their own beliefs into the things they create. SO my question becomes, does the author truly feel that he is so morally superior that he has the ability to act in this manner?

If he does, then I fear for him, his family and his friends.
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Old 12-22-2007, 10:18   #55
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Dang it, yet another similarity between that book and mine. Never read it either. I was recently talking to a co-worker about that one though.

I am not in the position to defend said author. I will say, just because some authors transpose their own views onto their characters this does not mean all do. Guilt by association?

I think it more likely this happens with protagonists than antagonists. And even with the protagonists, sometimes in the effort to portray a 'flawed' character, some things are not necessarily the author's own views.

Concerning cannibals, I guess I threw in the obligatory cannibal scene into my book. The question is, did they kill the people they ate or did they come across 'roadkill'? I think it matters.

In the absence of courts, what do you do? Let murderers go? Jails are a luxury of civilized society, if you are already starving yourself, do you house and feed prisioners? Not likely.

I imagine in an EOTWAWKI scenario, capital punishment would be both swift and common. Born of necessity rather than arrogance.

Of course, in the case of my characters feeding the cannibal to the pig, well...maybe I did go over the top a little. But, dang it, it fit the personalities of the characters who did it.
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Old 12-22-2007, 23:55   #56
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I read Patriots, and liked it ok, but didn't think it was one of the best post-apocalyptic books I'd ever read. Anyway, after TSHTF I wouldn't say "there won't be ANY law." I'd say the only law there is is what you(or your group) can enforce. Some areas will have a lot of law, and other areas will probably have none, but the main law will probably be the "law of the jungle".
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Old 02-05-2008, 15:01   #57
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survival books

Get Patriots b Jim Rawles. It is a TEOTWAWKI manual wrapped in a fun fiction novel. For the book and other info go to his blog http://www.survivalblog.com/. It is updated often and is quite usefull.
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Old 02-12-2008, 01:57   #58
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Bushcraft by Mors Kochanski.
I think it should be required reading for anyone wishing/forced to spend extended time outdoors.
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Old 02-21-2008, 19:37   #59
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Patriots is OK and as others say it does read more like an instruction manual with a story tossed in.

For a good little hand book pick up a 1977 edition Boy Scout handbook.
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Old 03-30-2008, 12:35   #60
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I can't believe nobody here has mentioned the "Foxfire" collections. The Foxfire books represent a GREAT collection of Appalachian folklore, stories and detailed information on practical skills ranging on everything from the recognition and use of medicinal plants to how to build a butter churn and how to preserve meats and vegetables.

The whole collection started out as a high school research project back in the 70s when a teacher realized that as the last of the elderly, true "mountain folk" up in the Appalachias slowly died away, two hundred years of mountain know-how, lore and skills would die off with them unless someone recorded it. Thus, the "Foxfire" project was born and his students began interviewing these mountain folks, collecting their stories and documenting their skills.

The project wound up lasting something like 20 years and the stories and skill demonstrations by the mountain folk were documented in school articles that were later compiled into the Foxfire books. If you want a really interesting read on everything from Appalachian ghost stories to detailed instructions on how to select safe mushrooms in the forest, treat illnesses with wild plants, or trap wild game, the Foxfire books are a must.

You can even learn how to build a working musket the 18th century way. ;-)
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Old 03-30-2008, 12:50   #61
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I thought I had mentioned Foxfire, hrm must have been in another forum. Sure wish I could find the set for cheap. My dad got me a couple books for my birthday, One being "Naked into the Wilderness Primitive WIlderness Living and Survival Skills" By John & Geri McPherson. Sofar it's a good book. The other book is "Deep Survival" by Laurence Gonzales, I think it's an account of survival stories and goes into the phycis of survival.

Not sure if anybody has mention Tom Brown Jr yet, his books are awesome and should be owned by everybody.
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Old 03-30-2008, 23:44   #62
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pulaskipusher View Post
I thought I had mentioned Foxfire, hrm must have been in another forum. Sure wish I could find the set for cheap. My dad got me a couple books for my birthday, One being "Naked into the Wilderness Primitive WIlderness Living and Survival Skills" By John & Geri McPherson. Sofar it's a good book. The other book is "Deep Survival" by Laurence Gonzales, I think it's an account of survival stories and goes into the phycis of survival.

Not sure if anybody has mention Tom Brown Jr yet, his books are awesome and should be owned by everybody.
Not cheap by any stretch, but here's a link to where you can purchase the whole "Foxfire" series.

http://www.foxfire.org/thefoxfirebookseries.aspx
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Old 04-07-2008, 20:26   #63
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I haven't read all the Foxfire books, but I did like the first 6. After that, I found they were getting more into entertainment-type subjects instead of the more practical subjects the early books covered.
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Old 04-25-2008, 00:43   #64
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http://ed-day.blogspot.com/

bird flu fiction
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Old 04-29-2008, 21:47   #65
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I recently read another one that I've added to my collection. It's The Black Death by Gwyneth Cravens and John S. Marr. It's about the Black Plague popping up in NYC.
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Old 05-01-2008, 10:26   #66
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Has anyone noticed the number of survival/preparedness books that are out of stock on Amazon? I was trying to order some as gifts the other day and most everything I wanted was gone...
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Old 05-31-2008, 13:11   #67
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Does anyone have Deep Winter and Shattered in PDF ?? Would appreciate an email of them if you please.... elglockATgmailDOTcom

thank you
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Old 07-20-2008, 17:08   #68
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I just added these two books to my collection after reading them:
The Big One - Kevin E. Ready
The Black Death - Gwyneth Cravens and John S. Marr
The Big One is about a series of big earthquakes hitting Los Angeles and the aftermath.
The Black Death is about a plague epidemic hitting the US.
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Old 10-28-2008, 08:03   #69
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I'm about halfway through Lucifer's Hammer and I'm very impressed. It's a great read--very exciting and the writing is excellent. Not just a survival book with a novel thrown in, but just an excellent book. Writing about that many characters is NOT easy, and the authors are doing a super job so far.

Two thumbs way up for this book.
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Old 11-05-2008, 18:47   #70
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http://www.amazon.com/Great-Influenz...5935657&sr=8-1

http://www.amazon.com/Boston-Survivi...5935741&sr=1-1

Boston T. Party's is for Y2K but still a quality read as is all his stuff. (If you don't have his gun bible, you are truly missing out). The Great Influenza is a good look at history and personnally, IMHO, something that we may face (again) in our lifetime.
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Old 11-06-2008, 07:13   #71
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While not wilderness-living oriented, Ayn Rand’s “We the Living” is worth including in the list imo. Although fiction, her depiction of 1920's Russia takes you thru a lot of the characters’ physical, social and emotional privations and their various responses to those things.

I’d started re-reading it last week, but quit when the election results came in. The book is pretty dreary & even depressing, and I just didn’t feel like subjecting myself to that any more than necessary after seeing how the election came out.

Whether or not a person agrees with all of Rand’s philosophies (she had just a visceral animosity for any form of religion), she was imo a brilliant intellect and that book in particular shows some of the privations people face in times of harsh, long-term economic & social hardship. Black- and gray-market dealings (as FerFAL has mentioned popping up in Argentina), facing wintertime with failing (or failed) utility services, even little thought-of things like smoky rooms & allergy-esque issues from using unseasoned firewood; it offers what I consider a pretty good ‘thru-the-window’ peek into what the people in those times would have had to deal with and slog thru on a daily basis. Mostly they’re the problems faced by city-dwellers in this particular book; not a lot of rural characters or settings in the book.
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Old 01-16-2009, 00:16   #72
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I've had a set of books called "The Foxfire Books" for years. They tell you how to do just about anything from making soap to butchering animals. Started out as one book and interviews with 'mountain folk' and ended up as 5 or 6.
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Old 02-17-2009, 09:29   #73
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I recently read:

Earth Abides--George Stewart

Alas Babylon--Pat Frank

and

A Wrinkle in the Skin--John Christopher

They are all very good books IMO. Earth Abides has a couple of hiccups, like gas still being good for a bit too long than realistic...but is was still great. I could see that Stephen King borrowed heavily from this when writing "The Stand".

Alas Babylon is a bit better, but short. I would have loved to see it a couple hundred pages longer.

A Wrinkle in the Skin is an earthquake EOTWAWKI novel and well written. Slightly dated, but very good if a bit short also. Still in print, I bought my copy online.

Non-fiction I added "Survive" by Les Stroud and "Wildwood Wisdom" by Ellsworth Jaeger and would recommend both as practical and easy to understand 'how to' books in the field of woodcraft and survival.
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Old 04-19-2009, 14:04   #74
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I recently added:

98.6 Degrees
When All Hell Breaks Loose

both by Cody Lundin

Anybody read these books? What are your thoughts on them?

Thanks,
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Old 07-05-2009, 15:56   #75
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I just ordered Matthew Brackens 3rd book in the Enemies series

" Foreign Enemies and Traitors" Hopefully as good as the others
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