GlockTalk.com
Home Forums Classifieds Blogs Today's Posts Search Social Groups



  
SIGN-UP
Notices

Glock Talk
Welcome To The Glock Talk Forums.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 04-21-2010, 00:07   #76
redbaronace
Senior Member
 
redbaronace's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 118
This is an excellent write up. Thank you for sharing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MacG22 View Post
B. CHECKING YOUR BAG AT THE AIRLINE

So you get it all packed and secured and you get to the airport. Here's where the list begins.

1. Be early. Please. If you're going to fly with the firearm, be early. I've never had it add more than 30 minutes to the whole process for me, but you want to give it even more than that in case you have to go through an extra security verification or two.

2. Go to the counter. You cannot use a skycap. You must declare with an agent. If you check in at the curb and then tell them you have a firearm, they may hustle you right to the front of the line. I've also had them get mad when I tried that and put me at the back and waste more of my time.


Special Note: I want to say this before we get to #3. The system I've worked out is very general, but it flies with almost every US airline I've flown on. In fact, I've had no problems. That's why I use original box for ammo and lock it down, etc. From airline to airline, they may have specific regs that TSA does not. TSA will let you cover your loaded mags. North West Airlines doesn't. Some want original ammo box, some don't . So instead of jumping through all the hoops for one airline or another, I just decided to get ONE system down and stick to it. So while you may be able to do some things a little different here and there--and I am not suggesting you cannot--I am only giving you my system that I've found to be less complex.

3. When I get to the counter, I pull out my driver's license, passport, copy of my itinerary (if I have it), a copy of the TSA firearm regs, and a copy of the airline's firearm regs.

I hand them to the agent and say, in a calm and slow tone, "Good morning. I'd like to declare that I will be carrying a legal firearm in my checked luggage, prepared to TSA and your airline's packing standards, and it's disassembled and ready for your inspection."

The combination of this formal and polite declaration, along with all the paperwork has been GOLD for me. Better, actually. Before there was always some hesitation or confusion on their part. But by giving them all the paperwork, by being formal and gracious, I've cut out more than 90% of the hustle I used to face while checking in. They seem to appreciate the preparedness, the organization, and the willingness for their inspection. You can say whatever you like, but I don't recommend walking up and simply saying that you have a gun (something I've seen happen before). I've just given you 100% check in gold, and if you ever do that and compare it you'll realize what great approach it is. Do as you will.

4. The agent will inspect the firearm. The more dissembled it is, the easier that will be. The more it looks like a "gun", the bigger the chance you have of a brady card carrier stalling you, arguing with you about how it's packed, etc. In general, if you have any real delays or issues, just calmly say, "Could I please have your supervisor inspect it, reference the TSA standards I provided for you, and help us all to get out of here in a timely manner?" I've only had to do that once, ever. I don't know if that's typical or lucky. But that's what led to my script and document presentation.

5. The agent IS NOT PERMITTED to mark the outside of the luggage with any sort of special tag showing there is a firearm inside. This is a big deal. This is what will keep your bag from becoming a target. If they try, just let them know that the tag must be inside of the bag. If they argue, get a supervisor. You generally won't have to fight this one, unless you're flying out of DC, San Francisco, NYC, etc.

6. At this point, they'll usually let you go. About every other time they'll take me to secondary screening which is around the corner, in a different room, etc. They'll have me unlock the case, they'll look, have me lock it back, send it through a screening machine, and that's it. Never had any problem there, and I prefer it actually because it's not being handled by the check in agents too much or anything.



C. THINGS I'VE HAD GO WRONG:

Not much to mention here, but just to give you all the info I can I'll give you my few stories.

1. Before I started disassembling the gun, I had agents pick it up, sweep me and everyone in line with the muzzle, and generally start a buzzing behind me that was followed by accusing looks when I saw these folks on the plane. Not worth it. Had all this happen a few times, and while it was a headache, it wasn't enough to discourage me from traveling with my gun--but it was enough to inspire me to just disassemble the thing when I pack it.

2. I had one female check in agent argue with me about every little thing. She was clearly a brady card carrier who said things like, "that thing", and "that deadly weapon" when she talked about the firearm. First I wasn't allowed to fly with ANY ammo. Then it was that I had to give her the combo to the lock. Then it was that I had to have a firearm tag on the outside of the luggage. It just went on and on until I got a supervisor, he got a copy of the regs, and we all went our way. That's why I take copies of the regs with me, put them in the case, and put them in the handle of the gun case after I lock it into my bag. And that's why I disassemble the gun in the case, and that's why I use a gracious and professional script.

3. One time in Denver International I was called down to a holding area after I had been at my gate for a while. They needed me to open it again and inspect. Not sure why. Took 15 minutes total, from leaving my seat at the gate to returning to that seat, and everyone was really polite and apologetic about it all. At least I knew my bag was under the plane and hadn't missed the connection.

And that's it. No other troubles.



CONCLUSION:
Feel free to add your own comments, stories, etc. You may do things very, very different and that is fine. I'm simply detailing my system and experience for those who are curious or who don't take their CCW with them when they travel because they're worried about the whole airport process. I know this system works for me, and so I have hope it will work for you as well.

It's really as simple as:
1. Secure the firearm in a locked case, according to regs.
2. Secure that locked case within your bag as possible.
3. Upon check-in properly declare your firearm and submit to inspections.

But as you know, there's always a little more to it than that. I do feel it's important to not go unarmed just because of the expectation of airport hustling. With luck, and the more of us that fly with our firearms, the easier it will become.

Best luck.
redbaronace is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2010, 05:07   #77
swinokur
Senior Member
 
swinokur's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Bethesda, MD
Posts: 2,196
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacG22 View Post
I use the kiosks if I need. Generally I try to check in online before I get there, though.

Here's why I like to use the kiosks...

When you check in at the kiosk, you can pretty well get done by the time they come and try and take any back you have selected to check. And you can select your seat, etc, which can be nice.

If you go to the counter and you get someone who is put off by the firearm, they may not be as kind an accommodating when selecting your seat for you. I was given a middle seat one time from that story I posted in the OP and when the plane took off there were tons of other seats open.

So the kiosk isn't bad, in my experience, but by far the best way to have checked in online and printed your boarding pass at hone, IMO.
I always get a seat assignment in advance. Waiting until you get to the airport could get you bumped if the flight is overbooked. Since you have to go up to the counter anywauy to declare your firearm, I skip the kiosk and just get in line. My .02
swinokur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2010, 05:15   #78
swinokur
Senior Member
 
swinokur's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Bethesda, MD
Posts: 2,196
Quote:
Originally Posted by B.Reid View Post
Does your bag that the guncase goes into have to be locked?
No, but if you want to lock, you may only use TSA approved locks if you desire to lock. TSA approved locks allow a TSA master key to open them if necessary but I have stopped using TSA approved locks as well since they seem to enjoy cutting them off instead of opening them with their key. I use a nylon wire tie to secure the outside of my luggage or nothing.You can get TSA travel locks almost anywhere these days but I refuse to waste any more money on them as TSA thinks bolt cutters are their master key.

Last edited by swinokur; 04-21-2010 at 05:28..
swinokur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2010, 05:20   #79
Cochese
CLM Number 209
Most mackinest
 
Cochese's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Unmarked Rustbox
Posts: 16,172


I suggest pasting this into your blog section, then throwing a link to it in your sig line, for easy reference.

That is what I did with the one I wrote years ago for here.

ETA: link to my write up...

http://glocktalk.com/forums/blog.php?b=22
__________________
"Never been dumped 'cause I'm the most mackinest,
never been jumped 'cause I'm known the most packinest."

Last edited by Cochese; 04-21-2010 at 05:21..
Cochese is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2010, 06:01   #80
digitalmike47
Senior Member
 
digitalmike47's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Virginia
Posts: 352
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacG22 View Post
B. CHECKING YOUR BAG AT THE AIRLINE

So you get it all packed and secured and you get to the airport. Here's where the list begins.

1. Be early. Please. If you're going to fly with the firearm, be early. I've never had it add more than 30 minutes to the whole process for me, but you want to give it even more than that in case you have to go through an extra security verification or two.

2. Go to the counter. You cannot use a skycap. You must declare with an agent. If you check in at the curb and then tell them you have a firearm, they may hustle you right to the front of the line. I've also had them get mad when I tried that and put me at the back and waste more of my time.


Special Note: I want to say this before we get to #3. The system I've worked out is very general, but it flies with almost every US airline I've flown on. In fact, I've had no problems. That's why I use original box for ammo and lock it down, etc. From airline to airline, they may have specific regs that TSA does not. TSA will let you cover your loaded mags. North West Airlines doesn't. Some want original ammo box, some don't . So instead of jumping through all the hoops for one airline or another, I just decided to get ONE system down and stick to it. So while you may be able to do some things a little different here and there--and I am not suggesting you cannot--I am only giving you my system that I've found to be less complex.

3. When I get to the counter, I pull out my driver's license, passport, copy of my itinerary (if I have it), a copy of the TSA firearm regs, and a copy of the airline's firearm regs.

I hand them to the agent and say, in a calm and slow tone, "Good morning. I'd like to declare that I will be carrying a legal firearm in my checked luggage, prepared to TSA and your airline's packing standards, and it's disassembled and ready for your inspection."

The combination of this formal and polite declaration, along with all the paperwork has been GOLD for me. Better, actually. Before there was always some hesitation or confusion on their part. But by giving them all the paperwork, by being formal and gracious, I've cut out more than 90% of the hustle I used to face while checking in. They seem to appreciate the preparedness, the organization, and the willingness for their inspection. You can say whatever you like, but I don't recommend walking up and simply saying that you have a gun (something I've seen happen before). I've just given you 100% check in gold, and if you ever do that and compare it you'll realize what great approach it is. Do as you will.

4. The agent will inspect the firearm. The more dissembled it is, the easier that will be. The more it looks like a "gun", the bigger the chance you have of a brady card carrier stalling you, arguing with you about how it's packed, etc. In general, if you have any real delays or issues, just calmly say, "Could I please have your supervisor inspect it, reference the TSA standards I provided for you, and help us all to get out of here in a timely manner?" I've only had to do that once, ever. I don't know if that's typical or lucky. But that's what led to my script and document presentation.

5. The agent IS NOT PERMITTED to mark the outside of the luggage with any sort of special tag showing there is a firearm inside. This is a big deal. This is what will keep your bag from becoming a target. If they try, just let them know that the tag must be inside of the bag. If they argue, get a supervisor. You generally won't have to fight this one, unless you're flying out of DC, San Francisco, NYC, etc.

6. At this point, they'll usually let you go. About every other time they'll take me to secondary screening which is around the corner, in a different room, etc. They'll have me unlock the case, they'll look, have me lock it back, send it through a screening machine, and that's it. Never had any problem there, and I prefer it actually because it's not being handled by the check in agents too much or anything.



C. THINGS I'VE HAD GO WRONG:

Not much to mention here, but just to give you all the info I can I'll give you my few stories.

1. Before I started disassembling the gun, I had agents pick it up, sweep me and everyone in line with the muzzle, and generally start a buzzing behind me that was followed by accusing looks when I saw these folks on the plane. Not worth it. Had all this happen a few times, and while it was a headache, it wasn't enough to discourage me from traveling with my gun--but it was enough to inspire me to just disassemble the thing when I pack it.

2. I had one female check in agent argue with me about every little thing. She was clearly a brady card carrier who said things like, "that thing", and "that deadly weapon" when she talked about the firearm. First I wasn't allowed to fly with ANY ammo. Then it was that I had to give her the combo to the lock. Then it was that I had to have a firearm tag on the outside of the luggage. It just went on and on until I got a supervisor, he got a copy of the regs, and we all went our way. That's why I take copies of the regs with me, put them in the case, and put them in the handle of the gun case after I lock it into my bag. And that's why I disassemble the gun in the case, and that's why I use a gracious and professional script.

3. One time in Denver International I was called down to a holding area after I had been at my gate for a while. They needed me to open it again and inspect. Not sure why. Took 15 minutes total, from leaving my seat at the gate to returning to that seat, and everyone was really polite and apologetic about it all. At least I knew my bag was under the plane and hadn't missed the connection.

And that's it. No other troubles.



CONCLUSION:
Feel free to add your own comments, stories, etc. You may do things very, very different and that is fine. I'm simply detailing my system and experience for those who are curious or who don't take their CCW with them when they travel because they're worried about the whole airport process. I know this system works for me, and so I have hope it will work for you as well.

It's really as simple as:
1. Secure the firearm in a locked case, according to regs.
2. Secure that locked case within your bag as possible.
3. Upon check-in properly declare your firearm and submit to inspections.

But as you know, there's always a little more to it than that. I do feel it's important to not go unarmed just because of the expectation of airport hustling. With luck, and the more of us that fly with our firearms, the easier it will become.

Best luck.
Great info....thanks.
__________________
Badges? We ain't got no badges. We don't need no badges! I don't have to show you any stinkin' badges!!"
digitalmike47 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2010, 06:33   #81
reckless45
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 4
Great info - i like the cable idea very much. Thanks!
reckless45 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2010, 16:51   #82
NickV02
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Texas
Posts: 50
Do you hold the case outside of your luggage while you declare it or do you have it packed already in the suitcase and then once you declare what you have you take it out of the suitcase when they want to inspect it?

Thanks for this great writeup !!
NickV02 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2010, 18:00   #83
swinokur
Senior Member
 
swinokur's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Bethesda, MD
Posts: 2,196
Quote:
Originally Posted by NickV02 View Post
Do you hold the case outside of your luggage while you declare it or do you have it packed already in the suitcase and then once you declare what you have you take it out of the suitcase when they want to inspect it?

Thanks for this great writeup !!
IMO I'd be careful about this. Depending on the carry laws of the state you're in, walking up to the counter with an encased but not packed firearm may or may not be legal. The exception might be that if the firearm case was your only luggage, you'd probablt be finebut I don't travel that way.. My procedure is to pack the case in my luggage and only open the luggage after declaring the firearm to the counter rep. and following their instructions. I have had one or two occasions where the rep didn't even bother to look at the weapon before handing me the declaration to sign

I'd rather pack it and be safe rather than sorry. Again, my .02 Others may disagree.
swinokur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2010, 21:09   #84
NickV02
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Texas
Posts: 50
That's the response I assumed but just wanted to confirm. I would imagine a firearm in a case would be considered a concealed weapon so I will keep it in my suitcase.
NickV02 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2010, 17:33   #85
skyparker
SkyMan
 
skyparker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Branson, MO
Posts: 41
Send a message via ICQ to skyparker
(This is the follow-up on my two posts made April 6th within this thread.)

Back from my Florida trip....

All went well with my departure on Allegiant Airlines declaring my Glock27 in a Pelican type case. I followed MacG22's instructions to the letter. I informed the Allegiant ticket agent that I had a firearm to declare. He simply had me sign their declaration notice. The gun case was placed in my suitcase. When the agent saw how it was secured with a cable and double locks, he only stated, "It's unloaded, right?" and left it at that.

The ticket agent then called for TSA. TSA escorted me to their bag screening area and saw how the case was secured and again I was only asked if it was unloaded. He then swabbed the interior of my suitcase and told me all was OK. There was NO interior inspection of the gun case at all.

The whole process from start to finish lasted 15min. Declaring the the firearm and doing the TSA screening probably took 10min or less.

Again, thanks to Mac for his write-up. I will have no hesitation of doing this again in the future.

(Oh, For our return trip, we had an overweight suitcase
due to the wife's shopping. So, a buddy of mine brought my gun case back from FL on his private plane. And yes, it was still unloaded and double locked.)
skyparker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2010, 20:13   #86
MacG22
CLM Number 213
Charter Lifetime Member
 
MacG22's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 9,576
Quote:
Originally Posted by swinokur View Post
IMO I'd be careful about this. Depending on the carry laws of the state you're in, walking up to the counter with an encased but not packed firearm may or may not be legal. The exception might be that if the firearm case was your only luggage, you'd probablt be finebut I don't travel that way.. My procedure is to pack the case in my luggage and only open the luggage after declaring the firearm to the counter rep. and following their instructions. I have had one or two occasions where the rep didn't even bother to look at the weapon before handing me the declaration to sign

I'd rather pack it and be safe rather than sorry. Again, my .02 Others may disagree.
I agree with this. Half the time the agent at the desk won't even open your bag. They'll have you fill out the declaration tag, put it inside your bag, and that's it for them. Then you'll either be forwarded to TSA for a quick secondary or they'll put it on the belt and instruct you that if TSA needs to inspect it more further then you'll be paged.

So I wouldn't take the unnecessary step of pulling it out ahead of time. I tend to think of it like this... "will my actions make the people behind the counter more or less comfortable?" Within the regs, I always aim to make them more comfortable. It almost always makes it easier on me to do that.
__________________
“Say what you will about the sweet miracle of unquestioning faith, but I consider the capacity for it terrifying...--Kurt Vonnegut
MacG22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2010, 20:15   #87
MacG22
CLM Number 213
Charter Lifetime Member
 
MacG22's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 9,576
Quote:
Originally Posted by skyparker View Post
(This is the follow-up on my two posts made April 6th within this thread.)

Back from my Florida trip....

All went well with my departure on Allegiant Airlines declaring my Glock27 in a Pelican type case. I followed MacG22's instructions to the letter. I informed the Allegiant ticket agent that I had a firearm to declare. He simply had me sign their declaration notice. The gun case was placed in my suitcase. When the agent saw how it was secured with a cable and double locks, he only stated, "It's unloaded, right?" and left it at that.

The ticket agent then called for TSA. TSA escorted me to their bag screening area and saw how the case was secured and again I was only asked if it was unloaded. He then swabbed the interior of my suitcase and told me all was OK. There was NO interior inspection of the gun case at all.

The whole process from start to finish lasted 15min. Declaring the the firearm and doing the TSA screening probably took 10min or less.

Again, thanks to Mac for his write-up. I will have no hesitation of doing this again in the future.

(Oh, For our return trip, we had an overweight suitcase
due to the wife's shopping. So, a buddy of mine brought my gun case back from FL on his private plane. And yes, it was still unloaded and double locked.)

Thanks for the update. I'm very glad it went well for you.
__________________
“Say what you will about the sweet miracle of unquestioning faith, but I consider the capacity for it terrifying...--Kurt Vonnegut
MacG22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2010, 01:37   #88
B.Reid
Senior Member
 
B.Reid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Montana
Posts: 2,285
I am in Alaska, first time I flew with a firearm. It was really no problem at all. The truth is they took special care with my bag. Also to the poster that said the gun dealers in Alaska would not let him come within 6 feet of the counter, He must be some kind of a hole because we visited several gun shops and they were very nice. My girlfriend bought a Browning Hi Power today, it will be shipped to a dealer back home. I brought my gun mostly just to test the system and I have found it to be very easy, just follow the rules. Of course you may have more trouble flying in and out of Progressive states but why would you live there anyway?
__________________
Embrace the apocalypse!

Earth has always been a dangerous place to live. Be prepared!
B.Reid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2010, 22:05   #89
Jon_R
Silver Membership
Senior Member
 
Jon_R's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 4,455
I traveled today for the first time bringing a pistol with me. I took some tips from this and it went pretty smooth. I took my G19 apart and put it in the lock box. Neither the ticket agent or TSA asked me to open the box. I think the ticket agent did something wrong though as after I went through security and got to my gate the gate agent called me up to confirm I was traveling with a weapon on me. I let them know that was not the case and they said oh.... We will let the captain know. I guess I was an honorary federal LEO for about an hour.

I expected the issue to come back up on my connection but they didn't say anything.
Jon_R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2010, 18:30   #90
mtnglocker
Senior Member
 
mtnglocker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Georgia
Posts: 133
Here's another horror story at baggage check-in. About 20 years ago, I was an active LEO, traveling with my wife on vacation to New Orleans. I had my S&W Model 38 Airweight, unloaded and locked inside a case per instructions from the airline. No problem leaving Tampa. I told the clerk I was an off-duty LEO, and want to declare an unloaded firearm in my luggage. He said no problem, put the blue tag inside the suitcase and I was on my way.

On the way back, at the NO airport, I approached the young female clerk with the same line. She said: "take the gun out, I need to make sure its unloaded." I looked around for a security guard or police officer to assist, but none around. I took the firearm out and swung open the cylinder to show her, as discreetly as I could. See, no rounds in the cylinder. She said: "You have to make it click so I could make sure." I asked her to repeat herself.......I said fine, and pointing it down in a safe manner, I dry fired it 3 times, see its empty !!! The "clicking" noise brought over a security guard and after I explained the lunacy and lack of knowledge of the clerk, not to mention the upset people behind me, he said you're good to go, have a safe flight.

Since 9-11, and the increased firearm carrying public, I'm sure training and experience of the clerks is somewhat better. Now I just try to drive on vacation.
__________________
G17, G23, G27 (EDC), G36, G21SF
GSSF
GeorgiaCarry.org Member
Patriot Guard Rider...Support our Troops!
mtnglocker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2010, 20:18   #91
MacG22
CLM Number 213
Charter Lifetime Member
 
MacG22's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 9,576
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtnglocker View Post
Here's another horror story at baggage check-in. About 20 years ago, I was an active LEO, traveling with my wife on vacation to New Orleans. I had my S&W Model 38 Airweight, unloaded and locked inside a case per instructions from the airline. No problem leaving Tampa. I told the clerk I was an off-duty LEO, and want to declare an unloaded firearm in my luggage. He said no problem, put the blue tag inside the suitcase and I was on my way.

On the way back, at the NO airport, I approached the young female clerk with the same line. She said: "take the gun out, I need to make sure its unloaded." I looked around for a security guard or police officer to assist, but none around. I took the firearm out and swung open the cylinder to show her, as discreetly as I could. See, no rounds in the cylinder. She said: "You have to make it click so I could make sure." I asked her to repeat herself.......I said fine, and pointing it down in a safe manner, I dry fired it 3 times, see its empty !!! The "clicking" noise brought over a security guard and after I explained the lunacy and lack of knowledge of the clerk, not to mention the upset people behind me, he said you're good to go, have a safe flight.

Since 9-11, and the increased firearm carrying public, I'm sure training and experience of the clerks is somewhat better. Now I just try to drive on vacation.
__________________
“Say what you will about the sweet miracle of unquestioning faith, but I consider the capacity for it terrifying...--Kurt Vonnegut
MacG22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-29-2010, 21:08   #92
NickV02
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Texas
Posts: 50
Mac, a huge thanks for taking the time to do that writeup. I followed your guidelines and it went very smoothly for me today.

I posted in my other thread I started about travelling to Vegas.
http://www.glocktalk.com/forums/show...6#post15211866
NickV02 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2010, 07:00   #93
swinokur
Senior Member
 
swinokur's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Bethesda, MD
Posts: 2,196
Quote:
Originally Posted by NickV02 View Post
Mac, a huge thanks for taking the time to do that writeup. I followed your guidelines and it went very smoothly for me today.

I posted in my other thread I started about travelling to Vegas.
http://www.glocktalk.com/forums/show...6#post15211866

+1 thanks Mac
swinokur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2010, 11:51   #94
MacG22
CLM Number 213
Charter Lifetime Member
 
MacG22's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 9,576
Quote:
Originally Posted by NickV02 View Post
Mac, a huge thanks for taking the time to do that writeup. I followed your guidelines and it went very smoothly for me today.

I posted in my other thread I started about travelling to Vegas.
http://www.glocktalk.com/forums/show...6#post15211866
Quote:
Originally Posted by swinokur View Post
+1 thanks Mac
No problem, guys. I'm glad it was a help. I remember looking for info and writeups before I flew and didn't find much (a few years ago). It's pretty terrifying if you get to an airport and don't have any guidance. At least, it was for me the first time. But then when I realized how easy it was to fly it was it took all intensity out of it. It's really not hard to do. I don't always travel with my firearm, but when I'm working on projects where I need it I'm glad it's easy to fly with it.
__________________
“Say what you will about the sweet miracle of unquestioning faith, but I consider the capacity for it terrifying...--Kurt Vonnegut
MacG22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2010, 11:42   #95
DocCasualty
Senior Member
 
DocCasualty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Northern Michigan
Posts: 659
Thanks for this excellent thread and information, Mac. I don't fly much these days but had pretty much concluded the hassles of checking a handgun into baggage wouldn't be worth it. Clearly it is generally much more straightforward than I had assumed.

Should the need arise, I'll reconsult your thread first, then check the airlines's and TSA's sites next!
__________________
NRA Life Member
DocCasualty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2010, 16:15   #96
dnuggett
PRO 2A
 
dnuggett's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: DFW TX
Posts: 2,346
tagged
dnuggett is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2010, 17:49   #97
Timberwulf
Pack'n Llama
 
Timberwulf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: TX
Posts: 985


I've had great experiences on American Airlines over the last 7 years flying multiple times a year. Pistol locked in a lunchbox sized Pelican case, clerks always just had me sign the unloaded form and set it on top of the Pelican, then wheel it over to TSA at the DFW airport, or more often at other airports they just put it on the conveyor and had me hang out for 10 minutes to make sure it cleared TSA.

Southwest was a little odd at Love Field a week ago - the ticketing agent had me open the slide to demonstrate it was unloaded. That was more reminiscent of when I used to fly with firearms around 1999-2002. On the way back to Dallas from Tucson, the ticketing agent looked horrified that the Dallas agent had had me do that, and indicated that he must not be briefed on current procedures because that's no longer their procedure.

Over the last 10 years of flying with firearms in checked baggage, it really is usually a pain-free, easy process and I've had no real troubles.
__________________
Glock 17, 26
Walther P99c QA
Sig P2340 (.357)
Timberwulf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2010, 18:22   #98
MacG22
CLM Number 213
Charter Lifetime Member
 
MacG22's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 9,576
Quote:
Originally Posted by Timberwulf View Post

Over the last 10 years of flying with firearms in checked baggage, it really is usually a pain-free, easy process and I've had no real troubles.
I'm really glad you wrote this. I wish everyone could read it.
__________________
“Say what you will about the sweet miracle of unquestioning faith, but I consider the capacity for it terrifying...--Kurt Vonnegut
MacG22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-04-2010, 14:10   #99
badlands99
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacG22 View Post
TSA is NOT allowed to have a copy of your combo or key that goes on the gun case.

First of all, tremendous amounts of appreciation heaped upon MacG22 for this information. It has emboldened me to give it a go. I'm flying tomorrow to New Orleans by way of who-knows-where and I was not looking forward to being unarmed during my stay, so... many thanks.

I was printing out the info from the TSA site and this is part of the page...

***PASTE***
We recommend that you provide the key or combination to the security officer if he or she needs to open the container. You should remain in the area designated by the aircraft operator or TSA representative to take the key back after the container is cleared for transportation. If you are not present and the security officer must open the container, we or the airline will make a reasonable attempt to contact you. If we can't contact you, the container will not be placed on the plane. Federal regulations prohibit unlocked gun cases (or cases with broken locks) on aircraft.
***END PASTE***

That seems to contradict the previous idea of the traveler being the only one who is allowed to have the key/combi.

Has there been a change?


Also, I'll be traveling on some of those small regional jets and I have a carry on bag that I can't be separated from (it has all my camera gear, IE: livelihood). Do any of you have any tips on how to deal with the crew if/when they tell me I'll have to check that bag? I can't let it get into the hands of those gorillas who throw bags around.

Thanks in advance for any info you can offer on that.
badlands99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-04-2010, 14:32   #100
swinokur
Senior Member
 
swinokur's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Bethesda, MD
Posts: 2,196
Quote:
Originally Posted by badlands99 View Post
I was printing out the info from the TSA site and this is part of the page...

***PASTE***
We recommend that you provide the key or combination to the security officer if he or she needs to open the container. You should remain in the area designated by the aircraft operator or TSA representative to take the key back after the container is cleared for transportation. If you are not present and the security officer must open the container, we or the airline will make a reasonable attempt to contact you. If we can't contact you, the container will not be placed on the plane. Federal regulations prohibit unlocked gun cases (or cases with broken locks) on aircraft.
***END PASTE***

That seems to contradict the previous idea of the traveler being the only one who is allowed to have the key/combi.

Has there been a change?
No but if asked to provide the combo, you can politely ask the TSA rep to give you the case so you can open it. You are obligated IMO to open it, not share the combo as that defeats TSA's rule about only you having access. I am lucky in that my Gunvaut Micro has a combo and a key. This is my opinion. Mac and others may differ.


Quote:
Also, I'll be traveling on some of those small regional jets and I have a carry on bag that I can't be separated from (it has all my camera gear, IE: livelihood). Do any of you have any tips on how to deal with the crew if/when they tell me I'll have to check that bag? I can't let it get into the hands of those gorillas who throw bags around.

Thanks in advance for any info you can offer on that.
I fly on regional jets quite a bit and you will be asked to check your carry on bag at the jetway before boarding if it doesn't fit the small bins on those small jets. My carryon is 14 x 9 x 22 and it is totally legal on a regular sized plane. I always have to give it to the baggage guys before boarding. You normally get it back when you deplane. Once the airline made us go to baggage claim to get our carryons. I believe that was a screw up.

There is really no way around that. I recommend calling the airline and asking what the max size carryon size will be for the jet you will fly. This way you can hang onto it.

Last edited by swinokur; 05-04-2010 at 14:54..
swinokur is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Tags
airplane gun, fly gun, tsa travel rules
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump




All times are GMT -6. The time now is 16:34.



Homepage
FAQ
Forums
Calendar
Advertise
Gallery
GT Wiki
GT Blogs
Social Groups
Classifieds


Users Currently Online: 1,422
433 Members
989 Guests

Most users ever online: 2,244
Nov 11, 2013 at 11:42