GlockTalk.com
Home Forums Classifieds Blogs Today's Posts Search Social Groups



  
SIGN-UP
Notices

Glock Talk
Welcome To The Glock Talk Forums.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-07-2012, 15:13   #26
Two Guns
VIP MEMBER
 
Two Guns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: NH
Posts: 4,147
What a great thread this is. Thanks for posting.
__________________
Have Fun and Shoot Straight !!
Two Guns is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-2012, 22:35   #27
Frankie Figs
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Spring Hill, FL
Posts: 14
Lots of great info in here! Thank you for your time!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Frankie Figs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2012, 22:19   #28
DJ Niner
Moderator
 
DJ Niner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: North-Central USA
Posts: 17,309
Smooth vs. grooved triggers

The full-size Glocks in 9mm/.40/.357 have always had smooth-faced triggers. Starting with the introduction of the compact (G19-size) handguns, compact (and later, sub-compact G26/G27/G33 guns) had a trigger with a grooved face. This feature was added to give the smaller models enough points under the "points system" import rules required by the Gun Control Act of 1968. To be allowed into the U.S., points are awarded based on features such as size, weight and caliber (generally, bigger is better), adjustable target sights, and grooved target-shooting-style triggers. Without the grooved trigger, the smaller Glocks could not be legally imported.

Glock trigger styles, smooth-faced on the left, grooved on the right:
Valuable Info

After using Glocks with both smooth- and grooved-face triggers, many shooters find they prefer the feel of a smooth trigger; others just want the same style trigger in all their guns so they handle in a similar manner. Based on this, many of the compact/sub-compact guns' grooved triggers are replaced by users with smooth-faced trigger assemblies made for the larger full-size models, which are interchangeable. Although the replacement of the trigger assembly is not a difficult task, there are a series of safety checks which should be performed prior to using a Glock that has had the trigger (with attached trigger bar) replaced. If you don't know how to perform these safety checks, it is recommended that you have a gunsmith or Glock armorer do the replacement, to ensure safe operation and no unpleasant surprises during use.

Smooth and grooved trigger assemblies, including the attached trigger bar:
Valuable Info
__________________
...The second most dangerous thing to do is Turning Your Life Around. Going by local news reports, if you start Turning Your Life Around, you will inexplicably wind up face down in a convenience store parking lot at 0300 with a bag of somebody else's money in your hand, a chalk outline, and half a magazine's worth of the taxpayers' bullets in your ass. -- Tamara K.

Link >>> http://booksbikesboomsticks.blogspot...ed-before.html

Last edited by DJ Niner; 06-16-2012 at 22:31..
DJ Niner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2012, 22:11   #29
DJ Niner
Moderator
 
DJ Niner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: North-Central USA
Posts: 17,309
One of the interesting things about the long-slide Glock 17L competition pistol, is that Glock was able to engineer it to reliably function with the same recoil spring assembly used on the shorter Glock 17, despite the longer slide and barrel. This was done by removing as much excess metal as possible from the 17L slide assembly, by machining cut-outs and recesses in non-critical areas of the slide. By getting the weight down to nearly the same weight of a model 17 slide/barrel assembly, the same recoil spring could be used without compromising reliability.

The photos below are of a late Gen1 model 17L and early Gen2 model 17, manufactured a little over a year apart (side-profile photos of these two guns can be seen in posts number 7 and 18, above). Although the frames were quite a bit different, as far as I can determine, there were no changes made to the basic Glock 17 slide assembly between these two models, so any differences are attributable to the machining required to lighten the slide for the model 17L.

The top view shows the most obvious difference; the "window" in the top of the slide between the front sight and the ejection port. This was not only for weight reduction; some 17L models were shipped with an optional ported barrel, which directed hot expanding gasses up through ports cut into the barrel, and out through this window, helping to reduce/suppress the tendency for the muzzle to rise or flip during recoil. On later Gen3 17L pistols, this window has been moved or reduced slightly in length to allow a larger base for mounting longer front sights, such as the light-pipe sights often used in action-shooting competitions.

Valuable Info


Flipping the slides over, we see the first major internal weight-reduction cut, along the lower-right edge of the 17L slide. This cut is deep, extending very close to the top surface of the slide.

Valuable Info


On both sides of the slide where the breech (or chamber) portion of the barrel slides up and down during cycling, the slide is much thicker, to guide the barrel into position as the slide opens and closes. These thick areas were reduced by machining the solid slab areas into "ribs", removing metal in two different spots so the barrel still would be correctly guided into position, but without using all the metal left in place on the model 17 pistols.

Right-side view (17L slide at the bottom):

Valuable Info


and left side view (17L slide at the top):

Valuable Info


These lightening cuts allowed the early Glock 17L competition pistols to exhibit the same high level of reliability as the service-grade model 17s, with the added perks of an extended sight radius and a lighter trigger connector, making them one of the first factory-issued long-slide high-capacity competition pistols on the market.



.
__________________
...The second most dangerous thing to do is Turning Your Life Around. Going by local news reports, if you start Turning Your Life Around, you will inexplicably wind up face down in a convenience store parking lot at 0300 with a bag of somebody else's money in your hand, a chalk outline, and half a magazine's worth of the taxpayers' bullets in your ass. -- Tamara K.

Link >>> http://booksbikesboomsticks.blogspot...ed-before.html

Last edited by DJ Niner; 04-20-2013 at 02:03..
DJ Niner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2012, 20:51   #30
DJ Niner
Moderator
 
DJ Niner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: North-Central USA
Posts: 17,309
Ported Glocks

Glock was one of the first handgun manufacturers to offer factory-made ported/compensated autopistols. Although there are differences between installing a compensator on a handgun, and porting the barrel/slide assembly, Glock seems to use the terms almost interchangeably, and so will I.

The purpose of a ported or compensated handgun is to reduce the recoil-related upward flip of the barrel when it is fired, thereby getting the sights back on target (or onto the next target) as quickly as possible. Porting can be done in different ways, and Glock has used several different methods on various models over the years.

The first ported Glock was the model 17L. Early versions had a barrel ported with three angled slots, to direct some of the powder gasses upward, reducing the muzzle flip when fired. Not all 17L models were ported; some had conventional (non-ported) barrels. Although Glock has never officially acknowledged a problem with the 17L ported barrels, there were reports from some users that the thin area between the ports would sometimes crack. All Gen2 and Gen3 versions of the 17L were only sold with non-ported barrels, which could be interpreted as a confirmation that there was some kind of difficulty with the earlier Gen1 17L ported barrels.

Early Gen1 G17L with ported barrel:
Valuable Info

Side view of barrel (removed from slide) to show profile of the ports:
Valuable Info

Top view:
Valuable Info
__________________
...The second most dangerous thing to do is Turning Your Life Around. Going by local news reports, if you start Turning Your Life Around, you will inexplicably wind up face down in a convenience store parking lot at 0300 with a bag of somebody else's money in your hand, a chalk outline, and half a magazine's worth of the taxpayers' bullets in your ass. -- Tamara K.

Link >>> http://booksbikesboomsticks.blogspot...ed-before.html

Last edited by DJ Niner; 07-14-2012 at 21:19..
DJ Niner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2012, 21:12   #31
DJ Niner
Moderator
 
DJ Niner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: North-Central USA
Posts: 17,309
Ported Glocks, chapter II

After discontinuing the ported Gen1 17L models, Glock didn't offer any ported models again until 1994. The new-for-1994 G24C long-slide was the same size as the 17L, but a little heavier (as were all .40 caliber versions of 9mm Glocks). It had a different arrangement and shape of ports on the barrel, but the ports were still centered on the barrel and still vented upward through the cutout in the top of the slide. The ports were also different sizes, with the first one (closest to the breech) being the smallest, the second being slightly larger, and the last two being the largest and equal in size.

Glock 24C:
Valuable Info

G24C port shape and location:
Valuable Info

The G24C was produced from 1994 to about 1998, although there are reports that occasional short production runs of non-ported (G24) models were released after this period. Although the G24C has been listed in the annual Glock catalog for the last several years, it appears actual production has been slow-to-nonexistent.

In the past, Glock also offered G24C slide/barrel assemblies for sale separately, so owners of service-length G22 .40-caliber pistols could "upgrade" to a target-style top end to make their Glocks more versatile. Ads for these slide/barrel assemblies can be seen in some of the late 1990s "Glock Annual" or "Glock Autopistol" magazines/catalogs.

EDIT: The 24C shown above is a Gen3 model. Some early Gen2 versions of the ported G24 were not marked "24C" on the slide; they were marked the same as the unported models ("24"), and the box label had a "-P" after the model number, designating a ported barrel.

.
__________________
...The second most dangerous thing to do is Turning Your Life Around. Going by local news reports, if you start Turning Your Life Around, you will inexplicably wind up face down in a convenience store parking lot at 0300 with a bag of somebody else's money in your hand, a chalk outline, and half a magazine's worth of the taxpayers' bullets in your ass. -- Tamara K.

Link >>> http://booksbikesboomsticks.blogspot...ed-before.html

Last edited by DJ Niner; 02-23-2013 at 20:53..
DJ Niner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2012, 10:35   #32
DJ Niner
Moderator
 
DJ Niner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: North-Central USA
Posts: 17,309
Ported Glocks - chapter III

Beginning in late 1996 or early 1997, a new style of porting became available on full-size and compact Glocks. Different from either of the previous styles, it consisted of two ports side-by-side at approximately 11 o'clock and 1 o'clock positions on the top of the slide/barrel assembly. These ports are oval-shaped, elongated front-to-rear, and the corresponding cuts in the slide are considerably longer than the ports, allowing gas to continue to vent through the ports even as the slide unlocks and begins to travel to the rear. The V-shaped offset position of the ports prevents the exiting gasses and any associated flash from affecting the sight picture during firing in low light; in fact, most visible flash occurs above the slight plane, and is far more visible when viewed from the side vs. directly behind the ports, where the shooter is located. This type of porting has been used on Gen2 and Gen3 Glocks, and is currently available only on Gen3 models; as of this date, no ported Gen4 models have been seen or announced.

Ported Glock 19C and 17C models (G19C has Robar's NP3 aftermarket/custom finish on slide and barrel):
Valuable Info

Close-up of dual V-positioned ports:
Valuable Info
__________________
...The second most dangerous thing to do is Turning Your Life Around. Going by local news reports, if you start Turning Your Life Around, you will inexplicably wind up face down in a convenience store parking lot at 0300 with a bag of somebody else's money in your hand, a chalk outline, and half a magazine's worth of the taxpayers' bullets in your ass. -- Tamara K.

Link >>> http://booksbikesboomsticks.blogspot...ed-before.html

Last edited by DJ Niner; 06-21-2013 at 20:03..
DJ Niner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2012, 18:07   #33
deplt1
Registered User
 
deplt1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: MA
Posts: 1
My Gen 3

I read in this thread about a Gen 3 witout the rail and without hand grooves. I live in MA and I own a 3 pin glock 23 that does not have a light rail or finger grooves on the front of the frame und the trigger guard. I had to add an aftermarket rubber hand grip to get the finger bumps.
Attached Thumbnails
Valuable Info - Click for larger version  
deplt1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2012, 08:52   #34
Glockdude1
CLM Number 185
Federal Member
 
Glockdude1's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Beaumont,Texas
Posts: 26,608


Quote:
Originally Posted by deplt1 View Post
I read in this thread about a Gen 3 witout the rail and without hand grooves. I live in MA and I own a 3 pin glock 23 that does not have a light rail or finger grooves on the front of the frame und the trigger guard. I had to add an aftermarket rubber hand grip to get the finger bumps.
Valuable Info

That is a Gen 2. The "third pin" was added to handle the .40 round.



__________________
"Some People Are Like Slinkies. They're Not Really Good For Anything, But They Bring a Smile To Your Face When Pushed Down The Stairs."

Last edited by Glockdude1; 07-27-2012 at 08:55..
Glockdude1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2012, 10:16   #35
stolenphot0
RTF2 Addict
 
stolenphot0's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Kettering, OH
Posts: 4,963
Since this is the knowledge thread, I will ask here. Did the Gen1 17s come with un-captured guide rods? I bought one used and its supposedly all factory. Just I can't seem to find anything on the guide rods.
__________________
--
Want to help my wife win a new mobility van?
Click here to vote

stolenphot0 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2012, 00:39   #36
DJ Niner
Moderator
 
DJ Niner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: North-Central USA
Posts: 17,309
Quote:
Originally Posted by stolenphot0 View Post
Since this is the knowledge thread, I will ask here. Did the Gen1 17s come with un-captured guide rods? I bought one used and its supposedly all factory. Just I can't seem to find anything on the guide rods.
Yes, I believe all Gen1 Glock model 17 9mms came with the old-style uncaptured recoil spring and rod. Actually, in the full-size models, I don't think the changeover happened until the Gen2 guns were in production, as my fairly early Gen2 17 also has an uncaptured spring.

The old-style Glock-manufactured uncaptured springs were made of flat spring wire, and the rod was polymer, with a tiny hole in the muzzle end of the rod. I don't think the early rods or springs were marked in any manner.

Springs for the full-size models in 9mm, .40, and .357 are backwardly compatible from Gen3 to Gen1. So, if you need a replacement spring, you can use any Gen1/Gen2 uncaptured spring and rod, or Gen2/Gen3 captured recoil spring assembly (RSA), that was made for a full-size Glock in any of the above calibers.
__________________
...The second most dangerous thing to do is Turning Your Life Around. Going by local news reports, if you start Turning Your Life Around, you will inexplicably wind up face down in a convenience store parking lot at 0300 with a bag of somebody else's money in your hand, a chalk outline, and half a magazine's worth of the taxpayers' bullets in your ass. -- Tamara K.

Link >>> http://booksbikesboomsticks.blogspot...ed-before.html

Last edited by DJ Niner; 07-29-2012 at 01:45..
DJ Niner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2012, 12:13   #37
stolenphot0
RTF2 Addict
 
stolenphot0's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Kettering, OH
Posts: 4,963
Quote:
Originally Posted by DJ Niner View Post
Yes, I believe all Gen1 Glock model 17 9mms came with the old-style uncaptured recoil spring and rod. Actually, in the full-size models, I don't think the changeover happened until the Gen2 guns were in production, as my fairly early Gen2 17 also has an uncaptured spring.

The old-style Glock-manufactured uncaptured springs were made of flat spring wire, and the rod was polymer, with a tiny hole in the muzzle end of the rod. I don't think the early rods or springs were marked in any manner.

Springs for the full-size models in 9mm, .40, and .357 are backwardly compatible from Gen3 to Gen1. So, if you need a replacement spring, you can use any Gen1/Gen2 uncaptured spring and rod, or Gen2/Gen3 captured recoil spring assembly (RSA), that was made for a full-size Glock in any of the above calibers.
Thanks. I ran my RTF2 17 spring in my Gen1 for a couple hundred rounds, but next outing I am going to use the uncaptured spring & rod.
__________________
--
Want to help my wife win a new mobility van?
Click here to vote

stolenphot0 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2012, 21:48   #38
westy39
Member
 
westy39's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Montana
Posts: 53
Thank you this thread is very well done and the information is golden.
westy39 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 14:36   #39
Slobo
Member
 
Slobo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Virginia
Posts: 32
In what year did the 2Gen give way to the 3Gen? If it differed by model, my interest is in the G17, G19 and G22.
__________________
Save Me, Save Me From Tomorrow. I Don't Want to Sail With This Ship of Fools.

Gen3 G17 Gen3 G19 Gen3 G21 Gen3 G22 Gen3 G23
Slobo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2012, 00:49   #40
DJ Niner
Moderator
 
DJ Niner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: North-Central USA
Posts: 17,309
My old Glock Annual catalog from 1998 shows Gen2 .357 models on the cover, but the catalog section shows a Gen3 photo for the G17 and G22.

Browsing through the Serial Number Research Project thread here at Glock Talk (check post #5):

http://www.glocktalk.com/forums/show....php?t=1287557

it looks like the first Gen3 G17 shows up in the CME serial number range, with a born-on date of November 1997, with a Gen3 G22 (CNW prefix) and a G19 (prefix CPH) showing up just a few months later in January of 1998.

Hope that answers your question!


.
__________________
...The second most dangerous thing to do is Turning Your Life Around. Going by local news reports, if you start Turning Your Life Around, you will inexplicably wind up face down in a convenience store parking lot at 0300 with a bag of somebody else's money in your hand, a chalk outline, and half a magazine's worth of the taxpayers' bullets in your ass. -- Tamara K.

Link >>> http://booksbikesboomsticks.blogspot...ed-before.html

Last edited by DJ Niner; 10-03-2012 at 00:53..
DJ Niner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2012, 19:22   #41
Nestor
Lean & Mean
 
Nestor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: From Canada with love!
Posts: 20,970


Thank You so much. Very informative thread and helped me a lot I believe. I have not much experience with the Glock pistols, but currently looking for model 22. I'm planning to join the local LE agency in the future, so familiarizing myself with this pistol sounds like a good idea. I have a pretty good choice of the models - generation 2, generation 3, generation 3 RTF2 and generation 4.
I'm torn between generation 2 and 4 now
Don't like the finger grooves, but the newest models suppose to deal with the recoil better.
Anyway, again - your information is great and very helpful.
Thanks
__________________
One day your life will flash before your eyes. Make sure its worth watching.

R.I.P Jeff (23Skidoo), Chad (CJLandry) & Mark (Okie) You all will be missed.
Nestor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2012, 02:27   #42
DJ Niner
Moderator
 
DJ Niner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: North-Central USA
Posts: 17,309
Thanks for the kind words. I hope you don't mind if I offer a few personal observations on the various Glock models, relating to your upcoming choice.

Having owned/used/carried a Gen2 G19 for almost 10 years, when I first grabbed a Gen3, the fingergrooves felt out-of-place to me, too. But when shooting the Gen2 rapidly, I had always seen a tendency for it to slowly work its way upward until my grip was compromised. It was worse when the gun was mid-winter-in-Fargo cold, or when my hand and the environment were both hot/humid. The fingergrooves really help lock the Glock into position in my hand, even when conditions aren't favorable for rapid firing. After firing just a few magazines, I was hooked, and I've never looked back. I keep a Gen1 and Gen2 around just for old times' sake, but for fast/serious shooting, Gen3 and 4 are simply better, IMO. The only exception is if your hand is so very large or small that the fingergrooves force an unnatural position of your fingers, like thin fingers spread widely apart, or thick fingers jammed together and riding on TOP of the ridges between the grooves.

The gripping surface of the Gen4 guns is fairly aggressive, and some folks don't like it for just that reason. It can be hard on clothes, seats, and any muffin-top fat rolls a person might have hanging over their belt. But it really shines where it counts, keeping that grip solid in your hand when shooting rapidly. The Gen3 RTF2 is also pretty rough, but it is a bit more fine-grained; some like it over the Gen4, but I think I'd still choose a Gen4 if I could only have one.

Before I sold it, I got a chance to shoot my old Gen3 model 22 in .40 side-by-side with my new Gen4 model 22. The snappy recoil was definitely easier to control with the Gen4, and I felt it was slightly less bouncy to begin with, probably due to the new dual recoil spring. I was sold on the .40 caliber Gen4s from that point on, and I will probably upgrade my G35 and G27 to Gen4 models at sometime in the future.

Good luck and good shooting with whatever you choose!
__________________
...The second most dangerous thing to do is Turning Your Life Around. Going by local news reports, if you start Turning Your Life Around, you will inexplicably wind up face down in a convenience store parking lot at 0300 with a bag of somebody else's money in your hand, a chalk outline, and half a magazine's worth of the taxpayers' bullets in your ass. -- Tamara K.

Link >>> http://booksbikesboomsticks.blogspot...ed-before.html

Last edited by DJ Niner; 12-10-2013 at 18:36.. Reason: Speling eror.
DJ Niner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2012, 12:08   #43
ca survivor
Senior Member
 
ca survivor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Florida
Posts: 6,930
great post, thanks
ca survivor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2012, 10:56   #44
tnhawk
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: SW Tennessee
Posts: 313
Thanks for an informative post Several questions I had were answered here.
tnhawk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2012, 01:24   #45
Nestor
Lean & Mean
 
Nestor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: From Canada with love!
Posts: 20,970


Quote:
Originally Posted by DJ Niner View Post
Thanks for the kind words. I hope you don't mind if I offer a few personal observations on the various Glock models, relating to your upcoming choice.

Having owned/used/carried a Gen2 G19 for almost 10 years, when I first grabbed a Gen3, the fingergrooves felt out-of-place to me, too. But when shooting the Gen2 rapidly, I had always seen a tendency for it to slowly work its way upward until my grip was compromised. It was worse when the gun was mid-winter-in-Fargo cold, or when my hand and the environment were both hot/humid. The fingergrooves really help lock the Glock into position in my hand, even when conditions aren't favorable for rapid firing. After firing just a few magazines, I was hooked, and I've never looked back. I keep a Gen1 and Gen2 around just for old times' sake, but for fast/serious shooting, Gen3 and 4 are simply better, IMO. The only exception is if your hand is so very large or small that the fingergrooves force an unnatural position of your fingers, like thin fingers spread widely apart, or thick fingers jammed together and riding on TOP of the ridges between the grooves.

The gripping surface of the Gen4 guns is fairly aggressive, and some folks don't like it for just that reason. It can be hard on clothes, seats, and any muffin-top fat rolls a person might have hanging over their belt. But it really shines where it counts, keeping that grip solid in your hand when shooting rapidly. The Gen3 RTF2 is also pretty rough, but it is a bit more fine-grained; some like it over the Gen4, but I think I'd still choose a Gen4 if I could only have one.

Before I sold it, I got a chance to shoot my old Gen3 model 22 in .40 side-by-side with my new Gen4 model 22. The snappy recoil was definitely easier to control with the Gen4, and I felt is was slightly less bouncy to begin with, probably due to the new dual recoil spring. I was sold on the .40 caliber Gen4s from that point on, and I will probably upgrade my G35 and G27 to Gen4 models at sometime in the future.

Good luck and good shooting with whatever you choose!
Thanks so much.
I may go with Gen4 in the near future if finances will allow.
I just found a deal that I couldn't pass.
Gen 2 Glock 21.
I may go for one of those grip enhancers to keep things under control.
__________________
One day your life will flash before your eyes. Make sure its worth watching.

R.I.P Jeff (23Skidoo), Chad (CJLandry) & Mark (Okie) You all will be missed.

Last edited by Nestor; 10-27-2012 at 01:25..
Nestor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2012, 01:35   #46
DJ Niner
Moderator
 
DJ Niner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: North-Central USA
Posts: 17,309
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nestor View Post
Thanks so much.
I may go with Gen4 in the near future if finances will allow.
I just found a deal that I couldn't pass.
Gen 2 Glock 21.
I may go for one of those grip enhancers to keep things under control.
Another great choice! Some of those Gen2 .45s shoot like fitted match-grade target weapons, once you find the load(s) they like. Congrats!


.
__________________
...The second most dangerous thing to do is Turning Your Life Around. Going by local news reports, if you start Turning Your Life Around, you will inexplicably wind up face down in a convenience store parking lot at 0300 with a bag of somebody else's money in your hand, a chalk outline, and half a magazine's worth of the taxpayers' bullets in your ass. -- Tamara K.

Link >>> http://booksbikesboomsticks.blogspot...ed-before.html

Last edited by DJ Niner; 11-30-2012 at 22:46..
DJ Niner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2012, 19:40   #47
evomike
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 1
I just bought a customized G23, it came with the hybrid barrel from KKM, aftermarket sights, and extended mag release. After reading this and other threads, I still couldn't determine what generation I have??? Serial number starts with DLU (not listed)??? it is a 3 pin, it has rail mount, and thumb rests, yet has no finger grooves on the handle? Any Glock experts out there that could help me out?
evomike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2012, 01:41   #48
DJ Niner
Moderator
 
DJ Niner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: North-Central USA
Posts: 17,309
A Glock in the DLUxxx serial number range should be a Gen3. I would venture a guess that during the customization process, the previous owner had the finger grooves removed from the front of the frame, as none of the Gen1 or Gen2 Glocks had thumb-rests on the frame. Removal of the grooves is relatively easy to do; the challenge is making the frame look good AFTER the removal.

In checking the Serial Number Project list (another thread in this forum), there is a DLU-series G23 listed, with a born-on date of 1 Jan 2000; the list also indicates that gun is a Gen3:

Valuable Info

Hope this is helpful.
__________________
...The second most dangerous thing to do is Turning Your Life Around. Going by local news reports, if you start Turning Your Life Around, you will inexplicably wind up face down in a convenience store parking lot at 0300 with a bag of somebody else's money in your hand, a chalk outline, and half a magazine's worth of the taxpayers' bullets in your ass. -- Tamara K.

Link >>> http://booksbikesboomsticks.blogspot...ed-before.html

Last edited by DJ Niner; 11-01-2012 at 01:47..
DJ Niner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2012, 09:12   #49
Dogman 10x
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 461
Great info.
Dogman 10x is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2012, 05:50   #50
DXThtr
Member
 
DXThtr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Pascagoula, Ms
Posts: 15
Awesome stuff!


Posted using Outdoor Hub Campfire
DXThtr is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Tags
generations
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump




All times are GMT -6. The time now is 13:46.



Homepage
FAQ
Forums
Calendar
Advertise
Gallery
GT Wiki
GT Blogs
Social Groups
Classifieds


Users Currently Online: 1,145
352 Members
793 Guests

Most users ever online: 2,244
Nov 11, 2013 at 11:42