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Old 10-12-2009, 00:04   #21
fredj338
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WiskyT View Post
Yeah, that's about right. I'm still using commercial cast bullets because I have a few thousand left from back when I could buy them for $24.00/K. I started casting and got a 358477 mold for my 38/357 and now that the bullets are basically free, primers have gone up but powder is still around $17.00/# for the 4# jugs of Unique I bought.

I have to get a 40 mold once I run out of the bullets I have and would actually like one at 165 grains since I carry 165 Rangers that I have a large quantity of. Nobody seems to make a 165, so I'm thinking a Lyman mold mild down a bit might not break the bank like a custom mold would. The Lyman molds are 175 I think, but my free lead runs a tiny bit heavier than Lyman #2 alloy and they'd probably be around 180. The 180's hit a bit high in my G27 as compared to the 165's, but in my Beretta 96 they hit about the same.
The Lee 170grTC cast of #2 will be pretty slightly less than 170gr. The Lyman 175grRNFP cast of ww goes right @ 172gr lubed. CLose enough to 165gr to make it work by adjusting powder charges.
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Old 10-12-2009, 07:31   #22
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Lee lists a 145 and two 175 molds these days. Lyman lists a 150 and a 175. I've had one Lee 158 mold that cast at 160, and a Lyman 150 mold that casts at 155 with the range scrap I use. I'm thinking that it might be cheaper and easier to get the Lyman two cavity and have a machinists mill it down so the bevel base is gone, maybe a bit more, and have it throw at 165 or so with "cheap" alloy that works well otherwise.

First step will be to get one of the 175 molds, I'm leaning towards Lyman now, and see how it does as is. Then I can hunt down a guy to mill it and see what that costs. It should be cheap, but everyone I come across down here thinks Yankees are all rich and try to gouge me on simple stuff. FWIW, when I say "mill" maybe I mean grind. I'm not a machinist, but I have walked through shops that were trueing up the face of cylinder heads with a grinder.
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Old 10-12-2009, 07:42   #23
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I would add one caveat for those reloading to USPSA Major PF with 155 gr bullets....throw away the cases after 6-8 reloadings for safety's sake....; I have seen my friend suffer 4 case head seps using a batch of 1000 rounds of brass reloaded 15-20 times. The 4rth case separation convinced him!
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Old 10-12-2009, 09:53   #24
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Originally Posted by WiskyT View Post
Lee lists a 145 and two 175 molds these days. Lyman lists a 150 and a 175. I've had one Lee 158 mold that cast at 160, and a Lyman 150 mold that casts at 155 with the range scrap I use. I'm thinking that it might be cheaper and easier to get the Lyman two cavity and have a machinists mill it down so the bevel base is gone, maybe a bit more, and have it throw at 165 or so with "cheap" alloy that works well otherwise.

First step will be to get one of the 175 molds, I'm leaning towards Lyman now, and see how it does as is. Then I can hunt down a guy to mill it and see what that costs. It should be cheap, but everyone I come across down here thinks Yankees are all rich and try to gouge me on simple stuff. FWIW, when I say "mill" maybe I mean grind. I'm not a machinist, but I have walked through shops that were trueing up the face of cylinder heads with a grinder.

Wisky:

Magma Engineering lists four mould designs that you might want to take a look at... two flat base designs and two bevel base designs. None of them are 165 grain but a couple are close;

Flat base:
160 grain Mould number, 10-160 SWC FB

170 grain Mould number, 10-170 FP FB

Bevel base:
155 grain 10-155 SWC BB

170 grain 10-170 SWC BB

Don't know if you'll have trouble feeding a SWC or not.

If you're not familiar with Magma Engineering they are located in Arizona and are the new manufactures of the Star sizer.

Telephone number: 480-987-9008

Jack
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Old 10-12-2009, 13:48   #25
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Good points Jack. I'd prefer a TC and I wonder if those SWC will run in a Glock. I had bad luck with SWC in a G17 because the extracting empty would hang up on the leading edge of the SWC shoulder in the mag below it. I think Magmas are spendy too? Are they iron/built to last? That 160 SWCFB casting a little heavy with my cheapskate lead would be close enough, maybe even exactly at 165.
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Old 10-12-2009, 13:59   #26
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Wisky:

The Magma's are similar to Lyman, same basic construction... will last several lifetimes. Really don't know how the SWC will feed but if you go to their web site, Magma Engineering, they have pictures of their bullet designs posted. One page for FB and one page for BB.

I would imagine they're fairly close to the cost of Lyman... maybe a few bucks more but if you don't have to have a Lyman mould milled I would guess the price would be pretty much the same. Good luck.

Jack
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Old 10-12-2009, 14:19   #27
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Originally Posted by GioaJack View Post
Wisky:

The Magma's are similar to Lyman, same basic construction... will last several lifetimes. Really don't know how the SWC will feed but if you go to their web site, Magma Engineering, they have pictures of their bullet designs posted. One page for FB and one page for BB.

I would imagine they're fairly close to the cost of Lyman... maybe a few bucks more but if you don't have to have a Lyman mould milled I would guess the price would be pretty much the same. Good luck.

Jack
Good to know about the price being competitive. I guess I was getting them confused with NEI. I looked at their price sheet one time and I suddenly had no interest in browing their website.
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Old 10-13-2009, 11:49   #28
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Howdy,

I've fired several 1,000rds, as in +10,000rds of my reloads through my G23 and G35 w/out any problems.

Paul
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Old 01-29-2010, 22:52   #29
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I've read most of these posts, lots of good info. I used to shoot my GLOCK's at the GSSF matches outside of Springfield MO. The .40 S&W load that I developed was 6.5 grs. of IMR PB with the 155 gr. (“bulk packed”, 2000 qty. per box) JHP bullet from GRAF and Son’s. By my last year of competition (2005), I had bought, loaded, and fired over 28,000 of these rounds through my GLOCK G27 and G35, and in the last couple of years a G22.

The .40 S&W by design was a very high pressure cartridge, (as high as the .357 magnum), VERY HIGH for semi auto pistols. Mistakes weren't suffered very well. In addition, the hammer forged, polygonal barrels, were VERY smooth compared to cut rifling, and caused a large amount of leading (lead build-up), that raised pressures sometimes to the point of failure.

At one of the GSSF meet a guy I’d met shot hand-loaded, lead .45 ACP ball reloads. Part way through his match his GLOCK G21 blew up and ejected the magazine out of the pistol, and shattered the polymer off of the magazine.

He said "the grip humped up in my hand"... A later inspection showed a very heavy build-up of lead in his barrel.

I developed my load in 2001 and had a few straight forward criteria. Clean burning, accurate, reasonable velocity (1100 fps), and 1000 loads per pound.

I still have several thousand .40 S&W cases for reloading. My target load is just that. For CCW carry my load of choice is 155 gr. Corbon, there is absolutely no doubt when one of them goes off, HOT STUFF indeed.

I will pass on something of value though... I’ve noticed when brass splits at the case mouth, they ring at a different tone than the rest of the cases. When I grab a handful of “emptys” in my left hand I try to make sure that I shake them and listen, if you hear a different pitch, stop and look for a split case mouth.

I’ve never “hot-rodded” a round, the need for more power is ALWAYS a reason to go buy a bigger gun 8-).

Lot’s of Luck,
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Old 01-29-2010, 23:05   #30
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Hey moderator,

Sorry, I have a small monitor and didn't see the notice that you had to approve the post. Please delete the extra posts !

Thanks,

parkerdude
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Old 01-30-2010, 11:17   #31
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I pretty much only use my own custom ammo. It is loaded on used brass so technically it is reloads.
I have run about 4000 full power loads through my G23.
155 XTP's or Noslers for practice at 1266 fps. Now that I have a Dillon I think I'm going to back off my practice ammo a bit to have a lot less recoil. No need to run "nuclear power," "blow everything up" loads all the time.

I use LongShot powder. It burns super clean, minimal flash and puts out super velocities with minimal pressure.
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Old 01-30-2010, 11:25   #32
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I'm gonna take the easy way out on most of this... I agree w/ everything fred said..

I just acquired the stuff to load 40, been so cold though I've not bothered going out to shoot much here lately, so I've not loaded any yet. Seems the main thing is to watch for bullet setback, and watch your brass for signs of high pressure. I considered an aftermarket barrel, but after looking at the chamber support on my newer Glock 40's, the support looks fine to me. I'm only planning on low-midrange loads anyways, so I doubt I'll have an issue.

Get a manual or 3, and stay within their recommendations, and you'll be fine. Starting lower than minimum has just as much potential for a catastrophic problem, as a double charge.

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Old 02-02-2010, 21:30   #33
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Just for the record my 1266 fps 155 grain bullet is not a max load and is under the specs of comparable Double Tap load. In over 4000 rounds not one buldge and the brass passed my 20 reload test. Now I load my 40 brass until I can't find them anymore. I run a stock barrel in my G23.
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Old 02-07-2010, 15:31   #34
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I've been reloading .40 S&W rounds for 10 years on a Dillon 550B press. My reloading log shows I've loaded over 20,000 rounds in that time and I've fired well over half that ammo, 90% of it through various Glocks, the rest through my Ruger PC4 carbine. As a LEO, I use once fired brass that I get from my department range, which is mostly Glock fired brass.

My point is I reload Glock fired brass to be used primarily in Glock's. I load at regular factory loadings using either 4.5 grains of Tite Group or 6.5 grains of Power Pistol with 180 grain jacketed bullets. I have never, ever had so much as one ammo related malfunction.

Just for my own satisfaction, in 2007 I set aside 200 rounds of factory ammo, Remington and Winchester headstamped. When I shot this ammo I made sure I segregated the brass from the rest so I could keep count of how many times I could reload it. Over a period of several months I fired it through my Glock 23 and reloaded this lot of brass 9 times. After 6 or 7 reloads I had three rounds with split cases at the mouth of the brass, but this could be expected with any round loaded half a dozen times. Not once did I have a bulge, kaboom, or busted case on the bottom end.

I see no significant issue with loading .40 S&W as long as you don't try to make major with the load. If you want a hotrod, get a 10mm, otherwise the .40 is just as safe as any other round to reload. Even if shooting through a Glock.
How do you take care of the pregnant looking empties? Cuz I had a G22 and that how the brass was coming out of it. Safe to reload?
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Old 02-07-2010, 23:11   #35
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I would toss the pregnant ones if I ever found one. If I did find one and the bulge was minor and don't show any signs of shaving brass or have a real bright spot upon going through the die I have reused them but now I have a couple thousand brass I just toss them if I were to ever see one again. I've seen bad ones during 10mm during load development. I had to see where the top end was. This is also why I stick to LongShot. It operates at lower pressure for the velocity it makes. I'm beginning to think this powder is why I seem to be charmed in my 357Sig/40S&W/10mm loads. When I tried #7 and #9 I saw lots of smileys and split brass. The rest of it went on the lawn. Once my Unique runs out for my 357 cast bullet loads I will switch it over to LongShot as well. Mike McNett put me on to LongShot and it was the best reloading tip I ever got.

I just finally got my own 550B. Now I go shooting more and shoot more while I'm out. I even gave a 100 rounds to a group of kids today at the range that had just bought a G22RTF from me. All I asked for was my brass back. They were stoked for the free ammo and I get to play with my new press some more. The RTF didn't bulge any brass either.
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