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Old 12-28-2009, 21:50   #26
Colorado4Wheel
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Originally Posted by VN350X10 View Post
Also, to insure against double charges, I always use a powder that fills more than 1/2 the case volume, in the case of my 9mm, the powder (Vhit N320) is only about 1/8" below the case mouth before seating the bullet.
No, this isn't the cheapest load I can use
Solo1000 will overflow with a double charge as well.
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Old 12-28-2009, 22:00   #27
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It's great seeing my old pro1000 is still used by some people. I found it to be very reliable and fun to use. However, I never used the case feed tubes, as I can drop a case with my left hand while I run the handle with my right hand.

This allows the shellplate to be changed by lifting the turret off and turning the index rod backward to remove the shellplate nut. I use this press to load several calibers, so changeing the shellplate is importand to me. Though I have only shot .22 rimfire for a couple of years.

One hint: I took a flashlight LED and put it in a hole I drilled in turret such that it shines into the case and lights the powder level.


Good Loading!!

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Old 12-28-2009, 22:00   #28
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Solo 1000 is an excellent 9mm powder for this reason. I don't use it, but I know several shooters that do & it's great.
KB's are just SOOOOOOO ugly !

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Old 12-29-2009, 01:38   #29
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I use 5.3 grains of Silhouette or, sometimes, 4.2 grains of Titegroup (with 124 or 125 grain bullets). Both fill the case approximately the same amount: just a bit under halfway.

A double charge would easily be visibly different. I always look into the case before seating the bullet, and won't do so if the powder level looks wrong. On my Dillon I have an RCBS lockout die, but I always peer into the case prior to seating the bullet anyway.

My experience with the Dillon is what gave me enough confidence to go with the Pro 1000, knowing that my reloading procedures are likely to be correct for it since they are very similar operationally. The Pro 1000 requires more attention but has fewer stations to watch and is smaller, so it's easier to keep an eye on everything.

Last edited by kcbrown; 12-29-2009 at 01:57..
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Old 12-29-2009, 07:10   #30
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Just in case, I reindexed the shellplate per the instructions. We'll see if the partial indexing issue resurfaces. I checked the casefeeder function after doing so and it still functions properly.
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Old 12-29-2009, 18:41   #31
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Well, there are two nylon pieces, it seems. There's the hex ratchet (PN TA2368), and then there's the ratchet gear (PN TR2432).

I have plenty of spares of the hex ratchet, but none of the ratchet gear.

It sounds like it's the hex ratchet (PN TA2368) that is easily damaged, and the fact that Midway carries them and not the ratchet gear supports this, but I wanted to make sure that indeed is what you're referring to.


With the shellplate carrier out, they suggest using a hex wrench to remove the shellplate, but unless the threads are clogged it sounds like it shouldn't be necessary to use it.

Like I said, I tend to be a "minimal force" kinda guy. So with that in mind, how little tightening can I get away with when installing the shellplate? Can I install it such that I stop tightening it right when I feel an increase in resistance, or is that too little?
It's the auto indexing hex ratchet. I have an unopened blister pack of three, so I guess I never needed it and just thought it was good to have. I opened the box of small Lee parts I have and dropped a shell plate on my foot to check, so I hope you're happy.

I forgot about the allen wrench to remove the shell plate, that's a good way to do it. As for how tight to make it, really just snug is good enough. I hold tthe drive bolt as tight as I can with my finger tips and turn the shell plate to tighten it and I never had a problem doing that.
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Old 12-30-2009, 05:52   #32
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It's the auto indexing hex ratchet. I have an unopened blister pack of three, so I guess I never needed it and just thought it was good to have. I opened the box of small Lee parts I have and dropped a shell plate on my foot to check, so I hope you're happy.
Hmm...I don't remember anything in the instructions that said you had to drop the shell plate on your foot as part of the disassembly process...

Anyway, many thanks for your courageous sacrifice! It shall be remembered with honor.


Quote:
I forgot about the allen wrench to remove the shell plate, that's a good way to do it. As for how tight to make it, really just snug is good enough. I hold tthe drive bolt as tight as I can with my finger tips and turn the shell plate to tighten it and I never had a problem doing that.
OK, this is very good to know. Thanks!

I'll probably load up another few hundred in the next couple of days or so. We'll see how well it does this time. All in all, it did pretty well the last time.
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Old 12-31-2009, 01:46   #33
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I loaded up another 200 rounds tonight with my Pro 1000.

The press functioned flawlessly. Not a single failure to properly index, not a single failure to feed a case, and not a single failure to properly prime a case. And this was with the z bar located in the proper hole, not the one I drilled.

It seems reindexing the press was the hot ticket for fixing the occasional half-index issue I had previously.

This time I sprayed a little Hornady One Shot case lube on the batch of cases I used, and that made the press considerably easier to use. That may have contributed to the reliability, though I doubt it since the press is mounted to an essentially immovable bench.

Anyway, time will tell but this seems to be a nice, reliable press, and the price was unbeatable. I think I'll keep it.
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Old 12-31-2009, 08:44   #34
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During some additional testing (more about that in a moment), the shellplate indexed halfway again.

So I decided to take the shellplate carrier off and pull it apart to inspect all the parts.

And guess what I found?


...


Nothing!

None of the parts were damaged. Everything looked good, everything fit together properly.

That's just as I expected. When I experience problems, they almost never have plainly visible causes.

There was a slight amount of dirty lubricant in the hex ratchet and the ratchet gear, but not nearly enough that it should have interfered with anything.

Even so, I decided to go ahead and replace the hex ratchet. Maybe I missed something subtle (don't think so, though).

Lee suggests in their troubleshooting section that if the shellplate indexes halfway, then the shellplate drive bolt may be damaged. It looked completely intact to me -- no visible damage at all.


I guess if it persists I may call Lee and ask if they have any idea what may be causing it to occasionally do that, but otherwise I'll just live with it. It does it only occasionally, and it's not terribly difficult to deal with it when it happens (the indexing works fine without adjustment after it happens).


So what was I experimenting with? Well, as it happens, it looked to me like the sizing die was a bit aggressive, and as I mentioned before, using some lube made it significantly easier to use the press. I had cleaned my cases with Nu Finish and mineral spirits and noticed that a thin film was being pushed down to the base of the cases as they were being sized, leaving a nice ring around the base. So I tried cleaning the cases with just mineral spirits to see how well the sizing die would work with them. It did roughly the same thing, actually, but not quite to the same degree. It was still harder to size a case than I was hoping. I actually have two Lee sizing dies in 9mm, and they both behaved the same way (with the newer of the two going slightly further down).

So I took my Dillon 9mm sizing die off my 650 and put it onto the Pro 1000. What a difference! Sizing the cases became considerably easier. The sized section was still visible enough to make it clear that while the Dillon die wasn't sizing quite as far down on the case as the Lee, it was very close. All the resized brass I tested passed the case gage.

So I'm going to try my next batch with the Dillon sizing die in place of the Lee. The press is back together and indexes properly. Cases feed reliably and properly.


What's not clear to me is exactly what should be lubricated and what it should be lubricated with. The instructions that came with the press say nothing about this, just that it should be kept well oiled. I suppose I might call Lee about that as well. I've greased the ram and lubricated the edges of the case feeder slide with silicone oil (being careful not to get any lubricant on the top of the slide). I've not applied any lubricant to the indexing rod, since the ratcheting system is nylon and I don't want to damage it or adversely affect its operation. I've applied no lubricant at all to the shellplate since I expect that doing so could adversely affect the priming system -- it's vitally important that no lubricant reach it at all.

If you've got lubrication tips for this press, I'm all ears.

Last edited by kcbrown; 12-31-2009 at 08:52..
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Old 12-31-2009, 10:27   #35
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Lube the indexing rod with a few drops of oil. It has metal to metal contact with the drive bolt. Ram is good to oil as you determined. Don't oil under the shell plate as this will atract mucho crud from primer dust etc. The beam that the case feeder slides on could be hit with a little silicone, no harm, but what I did was clean it up with scotch pad. This broke the burrs off the shapr edges and made the slider glide better.

I don't lube cases. I just push harder Lee says to lube about 1/3 of the cases with spray on furniture polish like pledge. You have to use the kind with wax in it. If you buy the one with "no wax build up" it does nothing. It's just a cleaner. I have done this and it really makes it easier. It makes your cases smell lemon fresh too, seriously, they smell great. Just grab a handful of the cases you are going to reaload and put them in a container. Ac ouple of quick shots with the Pledge and mix them back in with the unlubed ones. Don't worry about the foamy Pledge inside the cases, it doesn't effect the powder etc. I'll get back to doing it this way now that you reminded me of it.

Also, polishing cases increases the effort to resize them. I don't clean mine. The carbon acts as a case lube. My cases look like ass, but it saves a lot of time and trouble and I'm not going to polish anything that isn't connected to my body...
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Old 01-01-2010, 14:32   #36
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I took 25 cases out of a group of 100 I was going to reload (40SW). I put them in a box and hit them with two quick bursts of furniture polish, maybe one second total spraying. I threw the other 75 in the box and shook them around and ran them throught the 1000. The furniture polish really reduced the effort to pull the handle. I think it saves the pivot points in the linkage a lot of stress too. I'm going to continue to load like this from now on and can't figure out how I got away from it.
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Old 01-01-2010, 17:21   #37
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The problem with lubing the indexing rod is that it'll get lube on the hex ratchet where it makes contact with the indexing rod. And I would expect that to interfere with indexing -- it would make it easier for it to slip while turning the shellplate.

While there's metal to metal contact between the indexing rod and the drive bolt, the contact itself isn't under high pressure or anything. It's not clear that it needs lubrication. I guess if I lubricate any area of the indexing rod, it would be the area that the drive bolt passes over that the hex ratchet does not. But I'm concerned about the drive bolt spreading it over the rest of the indexing rod and the hex ratchet picking it up.

How and why this is supposed to be lubricated is one of the things I'll ask Lee when I call them.

Last edited by kcbrown; 02-23-2010 at 00:44..
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Old 01-01-2010, 17:21   #38
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I've got a Pro 1000. I played with it quite a bit trying to get the cases and primers to feed reliably. I consistently found that both were mutually exclusive. I finally resigned to -

Use my single stage press to decap / size.

Use hand primer to prime the shells.

Use the Pro 1000 with the stages -
stage 1 = flare / charge with the Auto Disk
stage 2 = bullet seating
stage 3 = Lee factory crimp

Obviously this is not ideal. But after many 1000s, I find that it works best for me. No frustrations. And my rounds have been consistent and reliable.
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Old 01-01-2010, 17:25   #39
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The problem with lubing the indexing rod is that it'll get lube on the hex ratchet where it makes contact with the indexing rod. And I would expect that to interfere with indexing -- it would make it easier for it to slip while turning the shellplate.

While there's metal to metal contact between the indexing rod and the drive bolt, the contact itself isn't under high pressure or anything. It's not clear that it needs lubrication. I guess if I lubricate any area of the indexing rod, it would be the area that the drive bolt passes over that the hex ratchet does not. But I'm concerned about the indexing rod spreading it over the rest of the indexing rod and the hex ratchet picking it up.

How and why this is supposed to be lubricated is one of the things I'll ask Lee when I call them.
I just put a drop here and there when it gets dry every few months on the rod. Between gravity and the passing of the rod through the shellplate, I'm sure it gets down in where you don't want it. It has never caused a problem.

ETA: The rod doesn't bear any load through most of it's travel, but when the twisted part passes through the parts that index the shell plate, It is going to have a load on it.
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Old 01-01-2010, 17:27   #40
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I just put a drop here and there when it gets dry every few months on the rod. Between gravity and the passing of the rod through the shellplate, I'm sure it gets down in where you don't want it. It has never caused a problem.
I use Gun Butter on mine. Works well.
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Old 01-01-2010, 17:29   #41
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The problem with lubing the indexing rod is that it'll get lube on the hex ratchet where it makes contact with the indexing rod. And I would expect that to interfere with indexing -- it would make it easier for it to slip while turning the shellplate.

While there's metal to metal contact between the indexing rod and the drive bolt, the contact itself isn't under high pressure or anything. It's not clear that it needs lubrication. I guess if I lubricate any area of the indexing rod, it would be the area that the drive bolt passes over that the hex ratchet does not. But I'm concerned about the indexing rod spreading it over the rest of the indexing rod and the hex ratchet picking it up.

How and why this is supposed to be lubricated is one of the things I'll ask Lee when I call them.
KC,

If it's the twisted rod that turns the turret, I lubed mine at first. Several people here recommended that it run dry. It is after all, steel and nylon/delrin. Mine ran better try than it did lubed. Dry also collected less grit/gunk in the "square ratchet bit" that you can't see unless you take apart the unit it's in. FWIW, mine ran better dry. YMMV

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Old 01-01-2010, 17:33   #42
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I had two Lee 1000's, I altered them quite a bit to keep them running and eventually stripped one for parts. The best thing I ever did to my two Lee presses was throw them in the garbage 17 or 18 years ago when I got my Dillion 650.
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Old 01-01-2010, 17:34   #43
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I use Gun Butter on mine. Works well.
I use whatever I can reach without having to get out of my chair. Sometimes I even use my calipers to knock something off the shelf. Most of the time it's Hoppe's liquid grease. I'm that lazy. i once called my wife intot he room under the guise that I wanted to tell her i love her, while she was in the room I asked her to get me the remote off of the coffee table
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Old 01-01-2010, 19:30   #44
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KC,

If it's the twisted rod that turns the turret, I lubed mine at first. Several people here recommended that it run dry. It is after all, steel and nylon/delrin. Mine ran better try than it did lubed. Dry also collected less grit/gunk in the "square ratchet bit" that you can't see unless you take apart the unit it's in. FWIW, mine ran better dry. YMMV
Yeah, the Pro 1000 turns the shellplate instead of the turret, but it's built very much the same as the LCT.

The Pro 1000 has a shellplate drive bolt that is steel or aluminum (the latter, I think) and instead of the indexing rod rotating the turret, it rotates the shellplate through the drive bolt instead. So there is metal to metal contact and it is under a little pressure during rotation -- but, generally, only a little.

I'm inclined to run it dry. Should be interesting to see what Lee says. I'll ask for an explanation of any answer they come up with.
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Old 01-01-2010, 19:32   #45
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I had two Lee 1000's, I altered them quite a bit to keep them running and eventually stripped one for parts. The best thing I ever did to my two Lee presses was throw them in the garbage 17 or 18 years ago when I got my Dillion 650.
Already have a Dillon 650, so I'm covered there.

It should be possible to make this press run reliably. It's only a question of how.
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Old 01-02-2010, 03:59   #46
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Already have a Dillon 650, so I'm covered there.

It should be possible to make this press run reliably. It's only a question of how.
Which begs the question. How long to get it to run reliably, or how long will it run reliably?

I guess the 650 loads ammo so quickly, it gives you time to tinker with the Lee. That in and of itself speaks volumes.

Sort of like my BMW 635. The Acura needs no maintenance, so I can slave over the BMW.
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Old 01-02-2010, 07:39   #47
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Which begs the question. How long to get it to run reliably, or how long will it run reliably?
Well, it doesn't necessarily beg them, but it does raise them.

(Don't worry, lots of people confuse the two, and I knew what you meant)


Both are good questions that I hope to answer through experience!


Quote:
I guess the 650 loads ammo so quickly, it gives you time to tinker with the Lee. That in and of itself speaks volumes.
Well, the 650 can load ammo really quickly, but my base rate is about the same with both it and the Pro 1000, probably because I'm smooth and methodical with both presses. The 650's ejection mechanism is better but on the Pro 1000 I just swipe the loaded round out of the ejection slider and into the bin, after seating the bullet, in the same motion that I use to grab another bullet. The impact on overall production rate is pretty minimal.

Where the Pro 1000 falls down in speed is with the last few primers of the session, where I have to use something (like a tie wrap) to put some pressure on the primers as the rest of the press operates in order to keep the primer seating trouble-free. Sometimes that doesn't work and I have to manually reposition a primer that's a bit off to the side in the priming mechanism.


I have experienced a couple of failures with the 650 just as I have with the Pro 1000. In the case of my 650, I had a problem with it seating primers high that turned out to be the priming pin assembly having come loose. I also had a problem with the casefeeding system, which turned out to be that the casefeeder cam screw had come loose just enough to cause the cam to move and the casefeed arm was no longer moving the cases into position properly, and as a result proper casefeeding became intermittent.

The difference between the Pro 1000 and the 650 is that I haven't experienced any persistent problems with the 650. At 5 times the price (I have the casefeeder), that's to be expected. The question is whether or not I can eliminate any and all persistent problems with my Pro 1000. The intermittent indexing problem I'm having is an example. Next on my list of steps to take to correct that issue is probably to replace the indexing rod and possibly the drive bolt. I'm going to order a number of spare parts from Lee and I may as well include those in the list.


Quote:
Sort of like my BMW 635. The Acura needs no maintenance, so I can slave over the BMW.
I'm hoping it doesn't wind up being like that. I think it should be possible to make the Pro 1000 a reliable machine by the proper combination of tweaks and operating technique. Only time will tell...

The BMW 635 is a very nice machine, though...

Last edited by kcbrown; 01-02-2010 at 07:52..
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Old 01-05-2010, 09:34   #48
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I didn't manage to get through to Lee via the phone, so I sent them email instead. I guess we'll see what they have to say.

The half-indexing problem got significantly worse even after replacing the hex ratchet. I had refrained from lubricating the indexing rod and I think that put a significant amount of additional wear on the hex ratchet, because once I replaced it and lubricated the indexing rod, the indexing suddenly got a whole lot more reliable.

The indexing problem may have started as a result of me not keeping the indexing rod lubricated.

So as of now, the two things I'll lubricate are the indexing rod and the ram. We'll see how reliable the indexing remains.
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Old 01-05-2010, 15:34   #49
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And not long after I posted the previous message, I went out and promptly got a number of half-index events. Some of them occurred with no cases in the shellplate.

I also managed to get through to Lee on the phone. Turns out that you are not supposed to lubricate the indexing rod. The guy on the phone was perplexed when I described the indexing problem -- he'd never heard of this problem occurring.

I ordered a number of spare parts, including replacement indexing rods and ratchet gears. I'm now on the third hex ratchet so I suspect that the problem is with the indexing rod. I'll replace it, the ratchet gear, and the hex ratchet at the same time when the parts come in. I would expect that would make this problem disappear.

I asked for a press I could tinker with and I got my wish!
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Old 01-05-2010, 16:08   #50
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And not long after I posted the previous message, I went out and promptly got a number of half-index events. Some of them occurred with no cases in the shellplate.

I also managed to get through to Lee on the phone. Turns out that you are not supposed to lubricate the indexing rod. The guy on the phone was perplexed when I described the indexing problem -- he'd never heard of this problem occurring.

I ordered a number of spare parts, including replacement indexing rods and ratchet gears. I'm now on the third hex ratchet so I suspect that the problem is with the indexing rod. I'll replace it, the ratchet gear, and the hex ratchet at the same time when the parts come in. I would expect that would make this problem disappear.

I asked for a press I could tinker with and I got my wish!
LOL...let me know when you finish tinkering & we can compare the box of parts. When I first got my Pro 1000, I spent time on the phone with their technicians. I'd make small improvements here & there. But I finally opted to raise the white flag & go the route that I previously posted.
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