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Old 01-01-2010, 18:29   #41
dudel
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Originally Posted by kcbrown View Post
The problem with lubing the indexing rod is that it'll get lube on the hex ratchet where it makes contact with the indexing rod. And I would expect that to interfere with indexing -- it would make it easier for it to slip while turning the shellplate.

While there's metal to metal contact between the indexing rod and the drive bolt, the contact itself isn't under high pressure or anything. It's not clear that it needs lubrication. I guess if I lubricate any area of the indexing rod, it would be the area that the drive bolt passes over that the hex ratchet does not. But I'm concerned about the indexing rod spreading it over the rest of the indexing rod and the hex ratchet picking it up.

How and why this is supposed to be lubricated is one of the things I'll ask Lee when I call them.
KC,

If it's the twisted rod that turns the turret, I lubed mine at first. Several people here recommended that it run dry. It is after all, steel and nylon/delrin. Mine ran better try than it did lubed. Dry also collected less grit/gunk in the "square ratchet bit" that you can't see unless you take apart the unit it's in. FWIW, mine ran better dry. YMMV

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Old 01-01-2010, 18:33   #42
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I had two Lee 1000's, I altered them quite a bit to keep them running and eventually stripped one for parts. The best thing I ever did to my two Lee presses was throw them in the garbage 17 or 18 years ago when I got my Dillion 650.
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Old 01-01-2010, 18:34   #43
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I use Gun Butter on mine. Works well.
I use whatever I can reach without having to get out of my chair. Sometimes I even use my calipers to knock something off the shelf. Most of the time it's Hoppe's liquid grease. I'm that lazy. i once called my wife intot he room under the guise that I wanted to tell her i love her, while she was in the room I asked her to get me the remote off of the coffee table
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Old 01-01-2010, 20:30   #44
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KC,

If it's the twisted rod that turns the turret, I lubed mine at first. Several people here recommended that it run dry. It is after all, steel and nylon/delrin. Mine ran better try than it did lubed. Dry also collected less grit/gunk in the "square ratchet bit" that you can't see unless you take apart the unit it's in. FWIW, mine ran better dry. YMMV
Yeah, the Pro 1000 turns the shellplate instead of the turret, but it's built very much the same as the LCT.

The Pro 1000 has a shellplate drive bolt that is steel or aluminum (the latter, I think) and instead of the indexing rod rotating the turret, it rotates the shellplate through the drive bolt instead. So there is metal to metal contact and it is under a little pressure during rotation -- but, generally, only a little.

I'm inclined to run it dry. Should be interesting to see what Lee says. I'll ask for an explanation of any answer they come up with.
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Old 01-01-2010, 20:32   #45
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I had two Lee 1000's, I altered them quite a bit to keep them running and eventually stripped one for parts. The best thing I ever did to my two Lee presses was throw them in the garbage 17 or 18 years ago when I got my Dillion 650.
Already have a Dillon 650, so I'm covered there.

It should be possible to make this press run reliably. It's only a question of how.
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Old 01-02-2010, 04:59   #46
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Already have a Dillon 650, so I'm covered there.

It should be possible to make this press run reliably. It's only a question of how.
Which begs the question. How long to get it to run reliably, or how long will it run reliably?

I guess the 650 loads ammo so quickly, it gives you time to tinker with the Lee. That in and of itself speaks volumes.

Sort of like my BMW 635. The Acura needs no maintenance, so I can slave over the BMW.
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Old 01-02-2010, 08:39   #47
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Which begs the question. How long to get it to run reliably, or how long will it run reliably?
Well, it doesn't necessarily beg them, but it does raise them.

(Don't worry, lots of people confuse the two, and I knew what you meant)


Both are good questions that I hope to answer through experience!


Quote:
I guess the 650 loads ammo so quickly, it gives you time to tinker with the Lee. That in and of itself speaks volumes.
Well, the 650 can load ammo really quickly, but my base rate is about the same with both it and the Pro 1000, probably because I'm smooth and methodical with both presses. The 650's ejection mechanism is better but on the Pro 1000 I just swipe the loaded round out of the ejection slider and into the bin, after seating the bullet, in the same motion that I use to grab another bullet. The impact on overall production rate is pretty minimal.

Where the Pro 1000 falls down in speed is with the last few primers of the session, where I have to use something (like a tie wrap) to put some pressure on the primers as the rest of the press operates in order to keep the primer seating trouble-free. Sometimes that doesn't work and I have to manually reposition a primer that's a bit off to the side in the priming mechanism.


I have experienced a couple of failures with the 650 just as I have with the Pro 1000. In the case of my 650, I had a problem with it seating primers high that turned out to be the priming pin assembly having come loose. I also had a problem with the casefeeding system, which turned out to be that the casefeeder cam screw had come loose just enough to cause the cam to move and the casefeed arm was no longer moving the cases into position properly, and as a result proper casefeeding became intermittent.

The difference between the Pro 1000 and the 650 is that I haven't experienced any persistent problems with the 650. At 5 times the price (I have the casefeeder), that's to be expected. The question is whether or not I can eliminate any and all persistent problems with my Pro 1000. The intermittent indexing problem I'm having is an example. Next on my list of steps to take to correct that issue is probably to replace the indexing rod and possibly the drive bolt. I'm going to order a number of spare parts from Lee and I may as well include those in the list.


Quote:
Sort of like my BMW 635. The Acura needs no maintenance, so I can slave over the BMW.
I'm hoping it doesn't wind up being like that. I think it should be possible to make the Pro 1000 a reliable machine by the proper combination of tweaks and operating technique. Only time will tell...

The BMW 635 is a very nice machine, though...

Last edited by kcbrown; 01-02-2010 at 08:52..
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Old 01-05-2010, 10:34   #48
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I didn't manage to get through to Lee via the phone, so I sent them email instead. I guess we'll see what they have to say.

The half-indexing problem got significantly worse even after replacing the hex ratchet. I had refrained from lubricating the indexing rod and I think that put a significant amount of additional wear on the hex ratchet, because once I replaced it and lubricated the indexing rod, the indexing suddenly got a whole lot more reliable.

The indexing problem may have started as a result of me not keeping the indexing rod lubricated.

So as of now, the two things I'll lubricate are the indexing rod and the ram. We'll see how reliable the indexing remains.
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Old 01-05-2010, 16:34   #49
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And not long after I posted the previous message, I went out and promptly got a number of half-index events. Some of them occurred with no cases in the shellplate.

I also managed to get through to Lee on the phone. Turns out that you are not supposed to lubricate the indexing rod. The guy on the phone was perplexed when I described the indexing problem -- he'd never heard of this problem occurring.

I ordered a number of spare parts, including replacement indexing rods and ratchet gears. I'm now on the third hex ratchet so I suspect that the problem is with the indexing rod. I'll replace it, the ratchet gear, and the hex ratchet at the same time when the parts come in. I would expect that would make this problem disappear.

I asked for a press I could tinker with and I got my wish!
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Old 01-05-2010, 17:08   #50
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And not long after I posted the previous message, I went out and promptly got a number of half-index events. Some of them occurred with no cases in the shellplate.

I also managed to get through to Lee on the phone. Turns out that you are not supposed to lubricate the indexing rod. The guy on the phone was perplexed when I described the indexing problem -- he'd never heard of this problem occurring.

I ordered a number of spare parts, including replacement indexing rods and ratchet gears. I'm now on the third hex ratchet so I suspect that the problem is with the indexing rod. I'll replace it, the ratchet gear, and the hex ratchet at the same time when the parts come in. I would expect that would make this problem disappear.

I asked for a press I could tinker with and I got my wish!
LOL...let me know when you finish tinkering & we can compare the box of parts. When I first got my Pro 1000, I spent time on the phone with their technicians. I'd make small improvements here & there. But I finally opted to raise the white flag & go the route that I previously posted.
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Old 01-05-2010, 17:17   #51
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when you get the half index,turn the adjustment screw till the shellplate tuns and pops into place.
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Old 01-05-2010, 17:20   #52
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when you get the half index,turn the adjustment screw till the shellplate tuns and pops into place.
That's correct and in the instructions. At least it used to be in the instructions when mine was made back in the 80's. He was advised to follow the directions and re-set the indexing. I figure he tried this already, maybe not?
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Old 01-05-2010, 17:24   #53
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when you get the half index,turn the adjustment screw till the shellplate tuns and pops into place.
You then turn the adjustment screw an additional 3/4 turn after it pops into place. See the Pro 1000 zero video here
http://www.leeprecision.com/html/HelpVideos/video.html
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Old 01-05-2010, 17:47   #54
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I never turn the screw once it pops in place. when you guys use the machine,use a smooth slow motion. If one is too fast it messes them up.
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Old 01-05-2010, 17:52   #55
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I never turn the screw once it pops in place. when you guys use the machine,use a smooth slow motion. If one is too fast it messes them up.
I go about 1/2 turn after it pops. If I don't, the shellplate lags behind. If I cycle the press too slowly, the primers don't fall into place. Smooth and slow yes, but not too slow. Flailing away at lightspeed trying to load 1000 rounds per hour will definately end in failure, but creeping along causes it's own problems in my expirience.
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Old 01-05-2010, 17:59   #56
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I go about 1/2 turn after it pops. If I don't, the shellplate lags behind. If I cycle the press too slowly, the primers don't fall into place. Smooth and slow yes, but not too slow. Flailing away at lightspeed trying to load 1000 rounds per hour will definately end in failure, but creeping along causes it's own problems in my expirience.
I agree with you on the rate. The Pro 1000 is not a press where you just crank the handle faster if you want a faster rate of production. When I used the primer feed, I'd encounter numerous issues - one case in the sizing die and a second that would creep too far and get crushed at the top of the stroke, or primers that would fail to be positioned for seating resulting in a loaded cartridge with no primer...PITA with powder spill.

It's best to focus on full & consistent strokes - both all the up & down.
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Old 01-05-2010, 18:06   #57
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one of the thing i have found most important with the pro 1k is that it be mounted on a STURDY bench.

I don't have much problem primers.Right whne I get to the up stroke and the primer is about to be seated,I pause for a split second. It seems to help with primer. I recall loading 500 rd of 45 once with no primers bad.
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Old 01-05-2010, 18:09   #58
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one of the thing i have found most important with the pro 1k is that it be mounted on a STURDY bench.

I don't have much problem primers.Right whne I get to the up stroke and the primer is about to be seated,I pause for a split second. It seems to help with primer. I recall loading 500 rd of 45 once with no primers bad.
Honestly, try giving your timing screw that additional 1/2-3/4 turn. It will get your shellplate turning sooner and this will trip the case sensor to release the primer sooner. It will then get there sooner before you reach the bottom of the ram's (top of handle's) stroke.
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Old 01-05-2010, 23:20   #59
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What the timing screw actually controls is how far the shellplate will rotate once it engages the spiral section of the indexing rod. It works because it controls the position of the teeth on the ratchet gear relative to those on the hex ratchet. The ratchet gear is held in place relative to the shellplate carrier by the timing screw.

The problem I'm having is unrelated to that setting, since the next shellplate rotation will be fine immediately after the errant one (after I reposition the shellplate, of course).

I have reset the indexing multiple times (I do so whenever I put the shellplate carrier back together, for one thing). Predictably, it has had no noticeable effect on the problem.


At this point it's unclear what the root cause of the problem is. I suspect the indexing rod may be machined slightly incorrectly such that the hex ratchet can't consistently get a good bite on the indexing rod. But it may also be that the ratchet gear has some subtle manufacturing defect that prevents it from being completely reliable in holding the hex ratchet in place during shellplate rotation.

I'm hopeful that I'll discover the root cause when my spare parts come in.

Last edited by kcbrown; 01-05-2010 at 23:33..
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Old 01-06-2010, 04:38   #60
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What the timing screw actually controls is how far the shellplate will rotate once it engages the spiral section of the indexing rod. It works because it controls the position of the teeth on the ratchet gear relative to those on the hex ratchet. The ratchet gear is held in place relative to the shellplate carrier by the timing screw.

The problem I'm having is unrelated to that setting, since the next shellplate rotation will be fine immediately after the errant one (after I reposition the shellplate, of course).

I have reset the indexing multiple times (I do so whenever I put the shellplate carrier back together, for one thing). Predictably, it has had no noticeable effect on the problem.


At this point it's unclear what the root cause of the problem is. I suspect the indexing rod may be machined slightly incorrectly such that the hex ratchet can't consistently get a good bite on the indexing rod. But it may also be that the ratchet gear has some subtle manufacturing defect that prevents it from being completely reliable in holding the hex ratchet in place during shellplate rotation.

I'm hopeful that I'll discover the root cause when my spare parts come in.
You may looked into this already. But one thing that I found affecting my indexing was that my carrier holder was warped. It's a cast aluminum part, IIRC. When I spoke with a technician at Lee, he said that 'you'll never get the indexing to work correctly if that part is warped.' You can buy a replacement for $20 from here -
http://www.leeprecision.com/cgi/cata...941.4162=90640

It's TR2429. I replaced mine and it helped resolve my major problem.

Just a thought.
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