Home Forums Classifieds Blogs Today's Posts Search Social Groups



  
SIGN-UP
Notices

Glock Talk
Welcome To The Glock Talk Forums.

 
  
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-27-2010, 12:34   #1
theGreenAggie
Senior Member
 
theGreenAggie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: DFW
Posts: 104
Small Broken Piece...?

Went shooting a couple of weeks ago, haven't had a chance to deal with this after the outing until now...

I was out with my G23 (.40) and another non-Glock (ewwww) handgun. I had four new factory magazines with me for the G23 that I was testing out (as if they wouldn't work right out of the box...)

Anyways, there were absolutely no problems, hickups, jams, FTF, or anything of the sort from the Glock. Thus far, completely normal (that G23 has NEVER given me any trouble).

This Glock is about 18 or 20 months old, I bought it new in the summer of '08. I think I've got between 3000 and 4000 rounds through it.

At the range, I never disassembled it or anything. I just took it out of my holster, shot the mag full of JHP, then started loading it with FMJ. I think I put 150 rounds through it that day.

When we got home, I disassembled it for cleaning, and this very small piece of metal fell out. We couldn't find at first where it came from, but my friend has a glock also, so we held the lowers side-by-side until we found the difference.

There are two small, rectangular pieces of metal on the inner lip of each rail just below where the receiving end of the barrel sits.

I can't seem to figure out what these pieces are for... It does not disrupt the railing configuration - the slide still fits on perfectly and the gun functions like normal when I fire it with snap caps.

Could they be simply reinforcement?

And what would happen if I fed it live ammo?

I have been carrying around my Kahr CW9 ever since! I feel naked without my Glock!

Because of it's age, it is just outside the warranty period of 1 year.

Please help!
Attached Thumbnails
Gunsmithing - Click for larger version   Gunsmithing - Click for larger version   Gunsmithing - Click for larger version   Gunsmithing - Click for larger version  
__________________
G23
theGreenAggie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-27-2010, 12:47   #2
pbv
Senior Member
 
pbv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 107
That is your locking block that has broken. VERY easy to replace, costs about 30.00. You can send it back to glock for warranty repair but you will pay more than the price of the part for shipping. Just order a new locking block and install it be removing the front two pins and then lifting the block out and drop your new one in and Bam! your golden.
pbv is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-27-2010, 16:58   #3
js415
Senior Member
 
js415's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Newnan, GA
Posts: 221
^^^^^

This is exactly right. I just took the Armorers Course a couple of weeks ago, and tried to diagnose your problem before I read the 1st. reply, and this is exactly what I came up with.

I agree also about ordering a new one and replacing your self.

Should take about 3 minutes to replace.

Let is know how it works out.

Jerry
__________________
Certified Glock Armorer
js415 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-27-2010, 19:07   #4
JohnKSa
Senior Member
 
JohnKSa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: DFW Area, TX
Posts: 1,990
If your gun has two pins above the trigger guard then remove the top pin (the locking block pin) first. It will push out but there may be a little resistance at first.

Next take hold of the slide stop lever and move it back and forth while applying pressure to the lower pin (trigger pin). The pin will push out, but you'll have to get the slide stop lever in the right position to allow it to move. If it "locks" in position, push the pin a little from the other side to release the pressure and then try again.

The slide stop will now come out of the pistol.

Using a small screwdriver or a punch, lever the locking block up out of the frame using the LEFT side of the frame as a fulcrum. Do not pry against the trigger bar on the right side of the frame.

Replace the locking block with the new part.

Replace the locking block pin (upper pin). Do it BEFORE replacing the trigger pin.

Put the slide stop lever in the proper position and install the trigger pin (lower, larger pin).
__________________
Do you have a TX CHL? Thank the
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
!

Last edited by JohnKSa; 02-27-2010 at 19:07..
JohnKSa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-27-2010, 20:47   #5
1006
Senior Member
 
1006's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Newnan, Georgia
Posts: 918
I would forward your pics to Glock and try for a free locking block.
1006 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2010, 12:40   #6
fastbolt
Senior Member
 
fastbolt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Within the lightning (Northern CA)
Posts: 9,972
The broken locking block has already been identified ...

As a Glock armorer I would suggest you take your G23 to a local Glock armorer. The armorer could replace your broken locking block (and Glock would send the armorer a replacement part) ... as well as check the gun to see if anything else requires repair at the same time.

For example, is the broken locking block the actual (only) problem, or a symptom of another problem?

Why not let an armorer inspect the gun?
__________________
Sub Club #9; .40 S&W Club #1953; S&W Club #3913
Retired LE - firearms instructor/armorer
fastbolt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2010, 17:29   #7
theGreenAggie
Senior Member
 
theGreenAggie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: DFW
Posts: 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by fastbolt View Post
The broken locking block has already been identified ...

As a Glock armorer I would suggest you take your G23 to a local Glock armorer. The armorer could replace your broken locking block (and Glock would send the armorer a replacement part) ... as well as check the gun to see if anything else requires repair at the same time.

For example, is the broken locking block the actual (only) problem, or a symptom of another problem?

Why not let an armorer inspect the gun?
Well now you got me scared!

I took it to a gunsmith yesterday, he agreed with y'all that it was the locking block, but didn't have one in the store so I'll have to order one.

What would have caused this? What else could be wrong? After all, it is a Glock!
__________________
G23
theGreenAggie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2010, 18:19   #8
JohnKSa
Senior Member
 
JohnKSa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: DFW Area, TX
Posts: 1,990
It's not a particularly common failure but it does happen. The locking block takes a beating during normal operation and it's not surprising that once in awhile you hear of one breaking.

You could send the pistol in for inspection if you're worried but I would just replace the locking block and go shoot it some more. If you break another one then it's definitely time for a checkup.

Probably a good idea to swap your recoil spring assembly out every 3K to 4K rounds so it's time for a new one of those too.
__________________
Do you have a TX CHL? Thank the
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
!

Last edited by JohnKSa; 02-28-2010 at 18:20..
JohnKSa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2010, 19:01   #9
fastbolt
Senior Member
 
fastbolt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Within the lightning (Northern CA)
Posts: 9,972
Didn't mean to scare you.

While broken locking blocks aren't a common occurrence, neither are they unknown. The trick is to see if it appears to be a simple failed block, or whether it might involve something else.

Everybody and their brother who hasn't attended a Glock armorer class still somehow seems to believe they're qualified to diagnose conditions and repair guns.

Yes, the design is simple.

Sometimes a problem may not be as simple as it might first appear to the untrained or inexperienced, though. (Which can also be said of armorers, of course, depending on their experience and attention to an issue. The human factor, so to speak, but at least they've had some exposure to armorer training. )

An inspection by someone familiar with Glocks from an armorer's perspective might see something not initially observed by some owner who learned how to push a pin punch and pull & plug in parts in their favorite Glock by reading info online.

3,000 to 4,000 rounds fired in a .40, huh? One of the hints mentioned by the instructor in my last Glock class was that if we're seeing broken locking blocks, locking block pins and trigger pins, that we're not replacing the recoil springs often enough. The 'official' recommendation given to armorers in that class was to replace recoil springs every 3,000 rounds ... except the instructor kept saying "every 2,000 - 3,000 rounds" when the subject was subsequently mentioned throughout the day.

How's the locking block pin? I've seen some L/B pins, especially in a couple of .40's -the last being a G23 - which looked like they'd been beaten on and gouged a bit.

How about the trigger pin? It absorbs force. Is it intact and not cracked where the slide stop lever rests within the left end groove?

Did the piece of the locking block arm cause any issues when working its way from where it was supposed to be? (Is the slide lock and the spring in normal shape and condition?)

Besides which, when a part breaks on a handgun it's not unreasonable to give the rest of the gun a quick inspection to see if anything else might need attention, or may appear to a trained eye that it may be about to require attention.

Might just be a locking block which failed unexpectedly for an unseen flaw, too. It can happen. Shooting 3-4K rounds without replacing the recoil spring might not have helped, though, either.

Glocks are still just handguns, and handguns are still just machines.

An inspection by a Glock armorer (or gunsmith familiar with Glocks) can help provide peace of mind when it comes to identifying problems and correcting them. Having the knowledge and experience to know something only requires a simple repair isn't quite the same thing as someone unfamiliar with the gun hoping a simple-do-it-yourself-repair is sufficient.
__________________
Sub Club #9; .40 S&W Club #1953; S&W Club #3913
Retired LE - firearms instructor/armorer

Last edited by fastbolt; 02-28-2010 at 19:04..
fastbolt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2010, 19:48   #10
JohnKSa
Senior Member
 
JohnKSa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: DFW Area, TX
Posts: 1,990
Quote:
Everybody and their brother who hasn't attended a Glock armorer class still somehow seems to believe they're qualified to diagnose conditions and repair guns.
Probably true, but if you meant me, specifically, I have attended a Glock armorer class. Although, to be fair, I let my certification expire recently.

In the armorer's class I took, a specific round was not given as a guideline for recoil spring assembly replacement, rather the instructor taught a method for testing a recoil spring assembly to see if it needed replacement.

That said, for .40S&W or .357SIG guns I would not argue against replacing the recoil spring assembly every 3K rounds. In fact, given the low cost (and the fact that you can usually get a couple free at a GSSF match if you ask nicely) it's hard to argue against replacing them even more frequently than that.

The OP said he had "between 3000 and 4000 rounds through it" and that's why I responded with those particular numbers. The main point I was trying to make is that he needed to replace his recoil spring too.
Quote:
Besides which, when a part breaks on a handgun it's not unreasonable to give the rest of the gun a quick inspection to see if anything else might need attention, or may appear to a trained eye that it may be about to require attention.
It's always good to have an expert look over a gun when a part breaks, on the other hand, shipping a firearm back to the manufacturer every time a part breaks is probably overkill.

I'm certainly not advising against having someone qualified look at the gun, however I was basing my advice on his mentioning that he had a gunsmith examine the pistol. I think that is probably sufficient and that's why I said that I wouldn't "send the pistol in for inspection".
__________________
Do you have a TX CHL? Thank the
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
!

Last edited by JohnKSa; 03-01-2010 at 13:34..
JohnKSa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2010, 20:00   #11
lethal tupperwa
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Virginia
Posts: 11,339


the reinstall instructions given above don't mention reinstalling the slide stop lever which will fall out when you remove the 2 pins.
__________________
Correctional and Therapeutic Mayhem Administrator EMERITUS

----------------------------------------

GLOCK CERTIFIED ARMORER
lethal tupperwa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2010, 20:15   #12
JohnKSa
Senior Member
 
JohnKSa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: DFW Area, TX
Posts: 1,990
?????
Quote:
...
Replace the locking block pin (upper pin). Do it BEFORE replacing the trigger pin.

Put the slide stop lever in the proper position and install the trigger pin (lower, larger pin).
__________________
Do you have a TX CHL? Thank the
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
!
JohnKSa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2010, 23:41   #13
fastbolt
Senior Member
 
fastbolt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Within the lightning (Northern CA)
Posts: 9,972
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnKSa View Post
Probably true, but if you meant me, specifically, I have attended a Glock armorer class. Although, to be fair, I let my certification expire recently.
Nah, I didn't mean you at all.

I remembered you'd been through the class.

I was also glad to read the OP had taken the gun to a gunsmith, too.

It's annoying to have to return a gun to most manufacturers. At least S&W pays the shipping & insurance both ways and usually has a fast turn around time.

The fact that Glock trains so many armorers is a benefit for Glock owners, like a gun store being able to have an armorer on staff even if they don't have an actual gunsmith.

I think the .40's & .357's are what are really influencing the faster recoil spring replacement guidelines in the Glock line, too ...

It'll be interesting to see if the new G22 recoil spring assembly influences the recommendation one way or another at some point down the road, too.
__________________
Sub Club #9; .40 S&W Club #1953; S&W Club #3913
Retired LE - firearms instructor/armorer
fastbolt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2010, 13:32   #14
JohnKSa
Senior Member
 
JohnKSa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: DFW Area, TX
Posts: 1,990
Quote:
I think the .40's & .357's are what are really influencing the faster recoil spring replacement guidelines in the Glock line, too ...
I agree. If I had a .40S&W or a .357SIG I would probably look at going with recoil spring that is slightly heavier than stock and I would really stay on top of the replacement intervals. Basically what Mark Passamaneck (MarkCO) recommended over a decade ago.

IMO, Glock does themselves a disservice by not being more vocal about having people replace the recoil springs at short intervals in those calibers and I suspect, like you, that the new recoil spring design in the Gen 4 Glocks is related to this issue.
__________________
Do you have a TX CHL? Thank the
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
!
JohnKSa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2010, 05:40   #15
Glockrunner
HOOYA DEEPSEA
 
Glockrunner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: SC
Posts: 4,797
Send a message via Yahoo to Glockrunner
In talking with GLOCK I believe there are now 17-18 different Locking Block designs.

Make sure your getting the right one and compare it closely with the orginal.

This is not uncommon of a break and what I like is, the gun still goes BOOM!
__________________
"As an OK State Trooper once told me, "Why shouldn't a "good" citizen be allowed to carry a gun, all the "bad" guys already do.""
Certified Glock Armorer
Glockrunner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2010, 21:55   #16
theGreenAggie
Senior Member
 
theGreenAggie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: DFW
Posts: 104
Thanks for all your input. The gunsmith that I took it to is about 3 or 4 miles from my home, but doesn't have the part. He gave me a business card to someone about 30 miles away that I could try to get it from, but I'd rather order from the internet.

I'm going to get the new locking block and a new recoil spring assembly. Anyone have a recommended website for ordering these parts?
__________________
G23
theGreenAggie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-15-2010, 06:19   #17
faawrenchbndr
CLM Number 281
The Dude Abides
 
faawrenchbndr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: east of East St. Louis
Posts: 34,289
Quote:
Originally Posted by theGreenAggie View Post
Well now you got me scared!

I took it to a gunsmith yesterday, he agreed with y'all that it was the locking block, but didn't have one in the store so I'll have to order one.

What would have caused this? What else could be wrong? After all, it is a Glock!
Structural flaw in the locking block. It happens, just a defective part.
faawrenchbndr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-15-2010, 22:12   #18
SCC
Member Me
 
SCC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: kennesaw GA.
Posts: 9,203
Send a message via Skype™ to SCC
GLOCKPARTS.COM
http://glockparts.com/Products.aspx?CAT=720
SCC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2010, 06:49   #19
theGreenAggie
Senior Member
 
theGreenAggie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: DFW
Posts: 104
Thanks, SCC!
__________________
G23
theGreenAggie is offline   Reply With Quote

 
  
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump




All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:02.




Homepage
FAQ
Forums
Calendar
Advertise
Gallery
GT Wiki
GT Blogs
Social Groups
Classifieds


Users Currently Online: 587
112 Members
475 Guests

Most users ever online: 2,672
Aug 11, 2014 at 2:31