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Old 10-12-2010, 19:14   #1
mywytefeet
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357 SIG Lee Factory Crimp Die Help...is this too much? Too little?

Hello All,

I loaded two batches of rounds. The round nose on the left is a 90gr Speer 357 SIG loads and the round on the right is a 124gr berries plated. My main concern is the crimp with a lee factory crimp die. I don't know how much to crimp. Based on these photos, are the crimped I have done too much? Enough? I did a thumb test and cycled the rounds through my pistol with no setback--just not sure if the crimp is too much or too little--since from the naked eye it looks like almost nothing is being done when I crimped.

Thanks for any help.

Reloading

Reloading

Reloading

Reloading

Reloading
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Last edited by mywytefeet; 10-12-2010 at 19:15..
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Old 10-12-2010, 19:38   #2
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That may have been crimped with the regular 357Sig dies; but, it was not crimped with the Lee Factory Crimp die for the 357Sig. That is a seperately sold die that produces a "stab" type crimp around the end of the case. I have found it useful for cast bullet loads in the 357Sig; but, it opens the groups when used with jacketed bullets.
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Old 10-12-2010, 20:03   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OkieGunNut View Post
That may have been crimped with the regular 357Sig dies; but, it was not crimped with the Lee Factory Crimp die for the 357Sig. That is a seperately sold die that produces a "stab" type crimp around the end of the case. I have found it useful for cast bullet loads in the 357Sig; but, it opens the groups when used with jacketed bullets.
No, it was done with a Lee Factory Crimp Die for 357 SIG. Maybe I am just not doing it hard enough in the hand press?
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Old 10-12-2010, 22:14   #4
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They don't looked crimped at all to me. Turn them nose down on a hard surface and try pushing down hard on the back of the case. If they push in to the case their not crimped enough. But, the berries plated bullet is probably going to give you problems. They are not a jacketed bullet and they don't like to be crimped (at least 10mm berries). Crimping deforms them and accuracy suffers. You should also use lead bullet reloading data, not data for jacketed bullets. They are probably a real bad choice for 357SIG.
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Old 10-13-2010, 09:47   #5
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Originally Posted by mywytefeet View Post
No, it was done with a Lee Factory Crimp Die for 357 SIG. Maybe I am just not doing it hard enough in the hand press?
The LFCD for the 357sig is sold separately & does what Okie describes. The die that domes w/ the set is a tape crimp, at least that is my understanding from reading the Lee site. I use Dillon dies, so someone correct me if I am wrong, but that looks like std TC to me. If it works, then it's enough.
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Old 10-13-2010, 13:47   #6
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use enough crimp to remove the bell on the case. If you are unsure if you have used enough crimp push down on the bullet with your finger hard. If the bullet setsback into case you need more crimp or your cases might be work hardened and not giving you enough neck tension. If you can't push the bullet back into the case and are still worried load 5 reloads into mag then load 5 HOT factory rounds on top of your reloads shoot the 5 factory loads allowing the 6th (your reload) to cycle into the chamber but don't shoot it. unload and check COL to see if you are getting any setback. If you can't push the bullet back into the case and you are not getting setback in the mag or when a round cycles into the chamber you should be good to go.
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Old 10-13-2010, 14:07   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by albyihat View Post
use enough crimp to remove the bell on the case. If you are unsure if you have used enough crimp push down on the bullet with your finger hard. If the bullet setsback into case you need more crimp or your cases might be work hardened and not giving you enough neck tension. If you can't push the bullet back into the case and are still worried load 5 reloads into mag then load 5 HOT factory rounds on top of your reloads shoot the 5 factory loads allowing the 6th (your reload) to cycle into the chamber but don't shoot it. unload and check COL to see if you are getting any setback. If you can't push the bullet back into the case and you are not getting setback in the mag or when a round cycles into the chamber you should be good to go.
I really don't understand how everyone lately thinks that this is a true accurate measure of crimp. Like they have calibrated fingers...

OP just look in you manual for the spec and measure with your dial calipers... then you know if you are under or over.... definative not conjecture.
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Old 10-13-2010, 14:46   #8
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If they chamber easily, and the bullets don't set back, the crimp is good. People get too worked up over crimp. Neck tension is what stops the bullet from going in too far and all the crimp in the world won't solve a lack of neck tension.
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Old 10-13-2010, 14:46   #9
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Originally Posted by Boxerglocker View Post
I really don't understand how everyone lately thinks that this is a true accurate measure of crimp. Like they have calibrated fingers...

OP just look in you manual for the spec and measure with your dial calipers... then you know if you are under or over.... definative not conjecture.
I have yet to see an OA crimp dimension in a manual. I think it varies enough w/ diff brass manuf to make it a bit vague.
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Neck tension is what stops the bullet from going in too far and all the crimp in the world won't solve a lack of neck tension.
You are 100% correct WT.
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Last edited by fredj338; 10-13-2010 at 15:23..
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Old 10-13-2010, 15:10   #10
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looks good to me! looks like my 9mm crimps i dont over crimp my plated bullets tho
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Old 10-14-2010, 20:05   #11
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Will the round nose bullets run in a 357 sig?
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Old 10-14-2010, 23:50   #12
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Will the round nose bullets run in a 357 sig?
If you find one that has a long bearing surface, like any 105gr or less, they run fine. I haven't found a heavier RN that works though. They get kinda pointy/longer at 115gr & heavier.
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