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Old 07-14-2011, 05:43   #1
RustyDaleShackleford
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Glock Crossdraw Or Small of the Back Holster

I did forum searches for a good 15 minutes, and couldn't find what I'm looking for, so I'm gonna post.

I've got a Gen4 Glock 26, and just picked up my CHP from the Sheriff's office, so I'm ready to begin carrying.

From pictures, descriptions, and reviews, I think I want either a small-of-the-back or a crossdraw holster. I know next to nothing about holsters, and would love to hear about any holsters made for either of these positions.

I think they made SOTB holsters for IWB as well as OWB, but I'm not sure. Any input on this and preference and experience would be great.

Thanks
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If you need something more powerful than a .45, you need something more powerful than a handgun.
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Old 07-14-2011, 05:47   #2
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I am in the same boat and have found some that look good but nothing I have actually tried and liked. I like small of back and cross draw, but I also have to be able to remove and replace it easily.

This one looks good but again I have not tried it yet.

http://www.tennesseeholstercompany.com/glock.htm
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Old 07-14-2011, 06:01   #3
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Most holster companies make these type. One I have just recently aquired is a Blade Tech that can be set up for strong side or cross draw, one of there less expensive kydex holsters with two belt loops.
I have also used a Don Hume strong side for cross draw, strong side for me is right handed.
Holster hunting and collecting them until you fnd the one you want.
OWB is usually easier but IWB conceals better in my opinion.
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Old 07-14-2011, 06:08   #4
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I've been interested on SOB holsters before, and what I've learned is that they are uncomfortable when I am driving or riding in a vehicle (or seated at all). Also, it seems like they would conceal well, but the way the grip is angled upward makes a crevice between the grip and my back for my shirt to come to rest in. Since the pistol is in my back, It's harder to notice. I'd constantly be feeling for the rig to make sure it's concealed. The grip angle also creates a great hook for chair backs. If someone does notice the pistol and wants to get it from the holster. It hard to defend back there. It's as available to them as it is to you. Range officers dislike them, because, when you draw, the pistol is oriented down the line. This is also true for cross-draw rigs. I didn't like it.

Cross-draw is great for someone who spends alot of time in a car. Easy to access from a seated or driving position, and it's still comfortable when you're seated. If a detective who does alot of surveillance wanted a "car system", I think it's a good idea. (more as a second or extra pistol). It's hard to get the gun in tight to your body for concealment. Day in and day out, I prefer a good pancake holster for concealment. The IWB models hide the pistol well, too. I hope you're happy with what you choose!
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Old 07-14-2011, 06:09   #5
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There are frequently nice holsters for sale in the classified ads here, so you can try something w/o paying brand new price!
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Old 07-14-2011, 06:14   #6
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I've been interested on SOB holsters before, and what I've learned is that they are uncomfortable when I am driving or riding in a vehicle (or seated at all). Also, it seems like they would conceal well, but the way the grip is angled upward makes a crevice between the grip and my back for my shirt to come to rest in. Since the pistol is in my back, It's harder to notice. I'd constantly be feeling for the rig to make sure it's concealed. The grip angle also creates a great hook for chair backs. If someone does notice the pistol and wants to get it from the holster. It hard to defend back there. It's as available to them as it is to you. Range officers dislike them, because, when you draw, the pistol is oriented down the line. This is also true for cross-draw rigs. I didn't like it.
Pretty much sums it up right there.
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Old 07-14-2011, 06:14   #7
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I use an SOB holster sometimes when walking my dogs, but it isn't good for regular use, since it's in the way sitting down in a chair or car. Crossdraw is good for riding in a car, but has other disadvantages. Most people carry a regular strong-side holster for a reason - because it's the most practical all-purpose holster and it allows a proper draw, which is the first step in your shooting fundamentals (not just a way of getting the gun out of the holster).
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Old 07-14-2011, 07:19   #8
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Ok, and thanks for the responses.

Tell me, are they different holsters for carrying ~3 o'clock or ~5 o'clock? What do they call them? I read people talking about appendix carry at around 4 or 5, but I don't know if they're different holsters or not.
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If you need something more powerful than a .45, you need something more powerful than a handgun.
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Old 07-14-2011, 07:34   #9
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Originally Posted by RustyDaleShackleford View Post
Ok, and thanks for the responses.

Tell me, are they different holsters for carrying ~3 o'clock or ~5 o'clock? What do they call them? I read people talking about appendix carry at around 4 or 5, but I don't know if they're different holsters or not.

For right handers, AIWB ( appendix in waist belt ) are held at generally at noon, 1,2, positions. For left handers it would be noon, 10,11, positions

your 300 o'clock is generally right side strong , and 5 o'clock is general behind the right hip.
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Old 07-14-2011, 08:38   #10
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For right handers, AIWB ( appendix in waist belt ) are held at generally at noon, 1,2, positions. For left handers it would be noon, 10,11, positions

your 300 o'clock is generally right side strong , and 5 o'clock is general behind the right hip.
Isn't your appendix towards about 4-5 o'clock on your belt line?

Dang, I thought I had it straight.
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If you need something more powerful than a .45, you need something more powerful than a handgun.
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Old 07-14-2011, 08:53   #11
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I use a crossdraw position with a Remora holster and it has worked well for me.
The nice thing about the Remora is that you can pretty much put it where and how you want to find your spot.

http://remoraholsters.com/
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Old 07-14-2011, 10:57   #12
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Originally Posted by RustyDaleShackleford View Post
Ok, and thanks for the responses.

Tell me, are they different holsters for carrying ~3 o'clock or ~5 o'clock? What do they call them?
Typically, a holster worn in the 3 oclock position should have little to no forward cant, and holsters to be worn in the 4-5 oclock position usually have some forward cant to them.

I prefer carrying at the 3 oclock position, I have a bulged disc in my back and if I carry any further back than 3 oclock my lower back starts screamin and hollerin at me after sitting just a few minutes.
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Old 07-14-2011, 15:28   #13
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SOB carry on a motorcycle?!?!?

Considering the potential for falling ... onto your back .... at speed ... and with some goodly amount of force?

There's no way in the world I'd increase the potential for a lower back/spine injury by wearing a SOB holster while riding.

When I was first getting back into bikes and was carrying larger (full-size) guns, I went back to trying a lightweight shoulder rig (I stopped using them for work & off-duty several years into a plainclothes assignment) and decided it still wasn't something I desired. I pulled a slim IWB (Blade-tech) out of my collection and tried it. Nope. I tried a couple of my different OWB holsters, too, eventually settling on that method.

I eventually settled on either mostly carrying one of my J-frames (pocket holster in jacket or vest), or one of my smaller (compact/subcompact) guns in an OWB situated approx 3-4 o'clock.

I've never cared for the appendix location, myself. I ride a cruiser and find that choosing the wrong belt buckle can be noticeable over the course of a long ride, or wearing a pocket watch in my jeans watch pocket, so anything larger than that is definitely of no interest to me.

The "tactical" appendix carry method has received a resurgence of interest again in recent years. Personally, I could see it having some appeal and practicality back when holsters weren't in vogue in the 1700's and belts or sashes were all that were at hand. At least with the canted cross-draw you have the muzzle poking outboard and not down into tender & sensitive spots.

I just spent some money having the local leather shop replace the cloth pocket in my old leather zippered breast pocket with the heavy leather they use for their version of "gun pockets". I also ordered a couple of different style heavy leather vests made with leather gun pockets (mine is more than 20 years old and has become somewhat frayed and worn).

In wet & cold weather I have a reinforced/armored jacket which has outside pockets large enough (and supported enough) to hold a full-size pistol. I've done it and forgotten it was there (probably due to the way the whole jacket feels and wears ... ).

Ride safe.

Just my thoughts.
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Old 07-14-2011, 18:04   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RustyDaleShackleford View Post
Isn't your appendix towards about 4-5 o'clock on your belt line?

Dang, I thought I had it straight.

nope - it is 1-2
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Old 07-14-2011, 18:27   #15
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Good comments so far, but I'd like to address one that is incorrect. When drawn correctly, the cross draw doesn't endanger those either on the firing line, or bystanders in an actual shooting.

And one plus, it is available to either your weak or strong hand. Oh, it is just as easily "defended" as a strong side holster, you just need to know how to do it. I guess I addressed three issues, sorry about that.
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Old 07-14-2011, 18:29   #16
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I'd stay away from SOB. Get a good IWB and a good OWB.
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Old 07-14-2011, 18:45   #17
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My S.O.B. holster is a Galco and I love it. However, the points made above about the practicality of sob carry are valid. Quite frankly, sob carry is a second-best-alternative no matter how you slice it. Does it have value? Absolutely. Best for day to day cc? Up to the carrying individual I'd suggest but for the most part not as practical as strong-side. However, as long as the sob holster is leather you can "train" the holster to conform to your body in the kidney position which is better all around for seated comfort and somewhat easier for a solid grip on your pistol. Stay safe.
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Old 07-14-2011, 19:56   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chevy327 View Post
I've been interested on SOB holsters before, and what I've learned is that they are uncomfortable when I am driving or riding in a vehicle (or seated at all). Also, it seems like they would conceal well, but the way the grip is angled upward makes a crevice between the grip and my back for my shirt to come to rest in. Since the pistol is in my back, It's harder to notice. I'd constantly be feeling for the rig to make sure it's concealed. The grip angle also creates a great hook for chair backs. If someone does notice the pistol and wants to get it from the holster. It hard to defend back there. It's as available to them as it is to you. Range officers dislike them, because, when you draw, the pistol is oriented down the line. This is also true for cross-draw rigs. I didn't like it.

Cross-draw is great for someone who spends alot of time in a car. Easy to access from a seated or driving position, and it's still comfortable when you're seated. If a detective who does alot of surveillance wanted a "car system", I think it's a good idea. (more as a second or extra pistol). It's hard to get the gun in tight to your body for concealment. Day in and day out, I prefer a good pancake holster for concealment. The IWB models hide the pistol well, too. I hope you're happy with what you choose!
Good post. That about sums that up.
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Old 07-15-2011, 07:30   #19
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SOB carry on a motorcycle?!?!?
Huh?? I didn't read any mention of that.
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Old 07-15-2011, 07:39   #20
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Crossdraw holsters are tricky be sure if you get one to train a bunch with an unloaded gun, as you may find that breaking your wrist to get a good grip has you pointing the weapon at your stomach mid draw, I am not a fan of them except for some very particular situatins , like personal protection drivers.

if you like them and they fit your need please be careful in your training.
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Old 07-15-2011, 08:24   #21
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Huh?? I didn't read any mention of that.
I know, right?

LOL

Somebody's got motorcycles on the brain!
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If you need something more powerful than a .45, you need something more powerful than a handgun.
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Old 07-15-2011, 08:32   #22
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I don't like either method...

SOB- As others pointed out, they are uncomfortable when seated and difficult to defend in the event of a gun grab. In addition, if you are pushed onto your back you will land on the gun and A) probably injure yourself and B) render the gun mostly inaccessible.

Crossdraw- Dominant hand and arm must cross your body to draw the pistol. This means your weapon arm can easily be trapped against your body by an assailant.

Just some things to consider. Do whatever works for you.
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Old 07-15-2011, 08:45   #23
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SOB carry on a motorcycle?!?!?
Whew! I'm glad you guys cleared that up for me. I was re-reading to see what I missed.

I carry a G26 usually in a CBST around 4 o'clock. It seems to be the best for me so far and I have tried a lot of them from a 5.11 cross-drawl Holster Shirt to Thunderwear. Both those can be worn from time to time just like the SOB, but IWB on your strong side will probably be the best overall. In the winter when wearing a jacket of heavier shirt, I sometimes carry OWB with the Glock hoslster at 3 o'clock and it's very comfortable and for a $10.00 hoster works pretty good.
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Old 07-15-2011, 12:40   #24
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Huh?? I didn't read any mention of that.


HA!

Yep, I mixed up this thread with another one.

That, or I do have motorcycles on the brain, as I've only recently been able to start riding mine again after a year's unwanted layoff from riding.

My comments about SOB still apply to regular carry situations, though.

I carried either a single cuff case or a thin leather dump pouch at the SOB position on my uniform gun belt at different times before moving them away from that spot. Too much discomfort and cumulative lower back pain while riding in a patrol car. After bumping back against walls & other hard surfaces I shudder to think of the pain and potential for injury if I fell, too.

I remember attending a training class where duty belts were mandatory. I made sure mine was clear of anything over the SOB area (from years of experience and having come to wear mine that way), but a number of other guys had things positioned SOB. Once we started rolling backwards on the hard concrete range surface, from a seated position to a supine position, the sudden realization of the discomfort involved occurred to a number of guys.

I remember watching other guys roll around on single layer vinyl mats many years ago, during DT training, and seeing them wince if they rolled across their lower backs while wearing gear on their belts over their lower backs, too.

This subject seems to come up periodically among the different forums. The responses usually fall just about evenly divided among folks who won't carry for concern over discomfort or the increased potential for lower back injury, and the folks who think it's the best thing ever. Take your pick. I've gone on at some length about what I consider the tactical & practical disadvantages, such as inaccessibility when it comes to the wearer reaching the weapon under some common conditions (like while being seated) , as well as being less able to protect the holstered weapon and deny an attacker access to it.

I can only think of one thread (from another forum) where one of the posters was able to relate an example of a close friend who had suffered a severe back injury from falling onto a holstered handgun located SOB, but the thought can be sobering.

There are holsters which I'd find acceptable for wearing under even arduous and physically strenuous conditions ... and there are holsters which I'd only consider marginally suitable for use to carry a holstered handgun from one room to next, providing nothing unexpected happened or no physical exertions were required. The SOB falls in a category more toward the second example ... for me.

Folks have to make their own informed decisions and suit themselves, though.

Luck to you in your choice.

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Old 07-15-2011, 14:56   #25
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You will find that cross-draw is discouraged in police agencies because of the attendant safety hazards: a right handed shooter points the gun at everyone to his left on drawing and holstering. 2nd, The shortest distance from holster to shooting stance is from the strong side. 3rd, in order to reach the cross draw, the gun must be worn forward of the hip where it is more easily exposed. 4th, with the butt forward, it is easier for a perp to disarm you in the event of a struggle or push/shove match. Yet another problem is that the gun rides where you would normally carry your spare mags.

The only advantage to a cross draw is for drivers and someone usually seated but not on a bar stool. A second advantage is that Hollywood and the TV cops look very sexy with their cross draw rigs, none of which are ever properly adjusted for the wearer.
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