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Old 03-08-2012, 09:27   #1
cowboy1964
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"Shelf life" of diesel?

So we all know gas basically "goes bad" after only a year or two (if not sooner).

What about diesel?
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Old 03-08-2012, 10:50   #2
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Has quite a decent shelf life,provided you store it properly.Watch for water intrusion ect,there are stabilizers made for diesel fuel.'08.
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Old 03-08-2012, 13:07   #3
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I have a decent supply of Pri-D fort diesel/kero and Pri-G for petrol. I have even read reports those products can be used to bring stale fuels back from the dead. Don't have any first hand experience with this.
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Old 03-09-2012, 07:35   #4
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Straight diesel fuel has a very long shelf life.........as in years. Underground, in stable temp, maybe ten or more, enen then, with a fungicide it can go almost indefinite........BUT to make the fungicide work, it must be circulated/agitated to make it work.
Bio on the other hand, is very short life and can be a REAL pain, about three months is all it will work for before growing too much fungus. Fungicide will break it down but it will still cause filter issues. It has moisture in it to a small degree no matter what. Absolutely avoid it for any prepping use.
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Old 03-09-2012, 14:42   #5
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I've read and heard that diesel stores well- but that was before the low sulphur diesel was mandated. A recent discussion about the low sulphur diesel with a mechanic leads me to believe that the low sulphur stuff doesn't last long at all.
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Old 03-12-2012, 19:15   #6
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I was thinking my next vehicles would be diesel. I may be able to get my hands on free used cooking oil.

With this in mind, how would this play into preps?
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Old 03-12-2012, 21:58   #7
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i too have read bad things about bio diesel fuels made from cooking oils having a short shelf life but if you can get a steady source, it would be a great way to put gas money towards something else, like storing diesel
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Old 03-13-2012, 07:34   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RWBlue View Post
I was thinking my next vehicles would be diesel. I may be able to get my hands on free used cooking oil.

With this in mind, how would this play into preps?
Get ta know food service folks,I've worked in the industry.Anyone who wants ta do this just keep the ingredients around a blend as needed.Chamois is your friend.'08.
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Old 03-13-2012, 13:25   #9
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I've run 6 year old diesel after a little additive.
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Old 03-13-2012, 14:28   #10
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My grand dad used to have a great big diesel tank for his farm tractors that he'd get filled about once a year. The stuff was always still perfectly good even when he was getting down to the last of it after a year had gone by.
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Old 03-13-2012, 16:25   #11
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From someone in the industry -

"We've seen gasoline have shelf life as little as a month--particularly if it is subjected to heat and moisture.

Diesel fuels fare a little better, but not much. Most all diesel fuel, including the EPA's mandated low sulfur version, has shelf life of from 3-to-6 months. Again, this varies widely. Recently we tracked a diesel fuel produced at a refinery in Texas to its final destination in Florida. When tested at the refinery the same day it was produced, the fuel barely met the specification for stability. After being stored, pumped into a coastal tanker, offloaded at Port Everglades, stored again, delivered to the fuel jobber, and finally to the customer, 23 days had passed. Again the fuel was tested. This "fresh" fuel now tested out of "spec."

In part, this has to do with new processing techniques developed by refiners in recent years. While the new refining methods are more efficient, producing more gasoline per barrel of crude, these fuels are often far less stable than the conventional "straight run" fuels we had before.

To make matters worse, the quality of the crude oil feedstock going into the refinery changes daily with each shipment. Processing equipment must be precisely adjusted to these varying qualities, but it doesn't always happen. This neglect results in poorly processed, less stable fuels. One oil company survey indicates that at least 50 percent of the gasoline sold today is substandard."
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Old 03-14-2012, 07:59   #12
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We run fleet vehicles at work,they buy the cheapest gas they can.'08.
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Old 03-14-2012, 08:29   #13
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We run fleet vehicles at work,they buy the cheapest gas they can.'08.

"We run fleet vehicles at work,they buy the cheapest gas they can."

I represented a company that owned a refinery and ran a couple of hundred gasoline stations.

If a person wants to believe that the high priced gasoline provided by the brand name station is of consistent high, exclusive quality, he might be disappointed if he did some research.

My observation is that gasoline and gasoline products were routinely traded between producers and distributors. Moreover, there is a little known practice called "branding". At many of our stations, the signage, the uniforms worn by the employees and the decals had a major oil company name. However, the stations and employees were my client's owned stations and employees!

Conversely, there are a number of no-name stations that routinely sell adulterated gasoline. The Lazars, who ran a network of fuel transportation firms as well as the gas stations, pleaded no contest late last year to a 54-count indictment charging them with a variety of felonies, including selling adulterated gasoline that destroyed the engines of vehicles.
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Old 03-14-2012, 09:37   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bdcochran View Post
"We run fleet vehicles at work,they buy the cheapest gas they can."

I represented a company that owned a refinery and ran a couple of hundred gasoline stations.

If a person wants to believe that the high priced gasoline provided by the brand name station is of consistent high, exclusive quality, he might be disappointed if he did some research.

My observation is that gasoline and gasoline products were routinely traded between producers and distributors. Moreover, there is a little known practice called "branding". At many of our stations, the signage, the uniforms worn by the employees and the decals had a major oil company name. However, the stations and employees were my client's owned stations and employees!

Conversely, there are a number of no-name stations that routinely sell adulterated gasoline. The Lazars, who ran a network of fuel transportation firms as well as the gas stations, pleaded no contest late last year to a 54-count indictment charging them with a variety of felonies, including selling adulterated gasoline that destroyed the engines of vehicles.
You missed it,we run about 76 +/- octane in the cars.We've started ta run a Prius 24/7 and I don't think they will last.Granted they are making $ on the front side,I think the back will bite there ass.'08.
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Old 03-14-2012, 12:47   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bdcochran View Post
I represented a company that owned a refinery and ran a couple of hundred gasoline stations.

If a person wants to believe that the high priced gasoline provided by the brand name station is of consistent high, exclusive quality, he might be disappointed if he did some research.
I have now reviewed/audited a couple of SCADA pipelines and refinery.

I find it interesting that a pipe may contain diesel one day and crude oil the next, jet fuel the next and high octane fuel the next. Oil may be drilled by BP, refined by Marathon, post processed by Exon and sold by a local no name jobber filing station.
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