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Old 03-22-2012, 11:23   #1
LSUAdman
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What the S Hits the Diaper - How to Prep with Young Children

When the S Hits the Diaper - How to Prep with/for Young Children


Okay guys, I thought I’d put together a semi-comprehensive guide on prepping for/with small children. I know some of you are parents out there (and a few are expecting). For those of you that are old hat with children, I’m sure all of this will be trivial. For new parents, I beg you to read and reread this.

While this article’s plan is to arm you with knowledge in what you need for a bug out bag for children, it will also help you better stock your diaper bag and help you pack for long car trips.

This info will not work for everyone. Not all children are created equal, and what I suggest may not work for you. Some kids will have special needs, others will be stoic and not need nearly this much. Your child may be older, or you may simply parent differently than I do.

I implore each of you to review and add to this guide, but please do not turn this into a proper parenting technique/gripe thread.

That said, I have created two separate parts to this article. A Glossary of Items and Needs Per Stage. The Glossary will gloss over terms used in the Needs section and will have usage amounts, expiration expectations and useful descriptions. I have tried hard not to give specific brands, but had to in a few cases.

Finally, the Needs Per State will show an approximation of what each child will need per their age (newborn, infant, toddler and yourchild).

Again, I thank all of your for reading this and for the many dads on this board who have contributed (knowingly and unknowingly). If there is further interest, I will write more concerning needs for pregnant women, post-pregnant women, first few days,etc.



Glossary of Items:

Breast Milk – For the first months of a baby’s development, breast milk will make up the bulk ofthe child’s nourishment (if this is not the case for you, please skip down to Formula below). This obviously means the mother’s diet incredibly important,but we will not focus on that in this article. Breast milk is full of benefits,and being able to produce a reliable quantity a day can be invaluable in a bugout or bug in situation.

Without getting preachy, breast milk has lots of benefits. For starters it has a great shelf life, able to be stored for six hours (at 79*F)for up to ten hours unrefrigerated. If refrigerated (39*-32*F) it will stay fresh for eight days. If you have the ability to freeze breast milk you can store it for three to six months (some sources claim up to a year).

Due to breast milk’s bactericidal properties it can be stored in just about anything, through glass is considered best with clear plastic containers a close second.

Benefits include being able to boost the baby and mother’s immune systems, increase metabolism in mother, helps fight off certain infections (breast milk under two days old can kill e.coli on surfaces) and provides beneficial germs to help regulate baby’s digestion.

Formula – Forolder children or families who do not breast feed, formula provides the bulk of a child’s diet. Unfortunately, dry formula does not last long – an unopened can of dry formula has a shelf life of roughly one month from date of purchase.

Once opened and mixed with water the formula must be used within one hour or refrigerated. If refrigerated (39*-32*F) the opened formula can be stored for only eight hours. Storage solutions are the same as for breast milk.

While not the immune fortifying food source that breast milk is, formula does have some benefits. First, it is loaded with healthy fat, vitamins and minerals that may not be found in breast milk. Secondly it digests much slower, perfect for when other food sources are not available or when breast milk production slows. It also contains prebiotics which help feed the beneficial bacteria in the baby’s gut. That said, formula can cause diarrheal issues with some babies.

Premade, wet formula solutions do exist. They are packaged in glass jars and adhere to the same rules as above.

Swaddling Blankets– This is as important to a newborn and infant as clothes. Since young babies are known to thrash around in their sleep and/or scratch themselves, this helps to keep them secure. It also help calm fussy babies by giving them a warm, cozy environment – great for helping a baby to go to sleep.

Milk – As your child develops breast milk/formula will eventually be weaned off and replaced by normal milk. My suggestion is to use whole milk with a DHA additive. In a pinch milk can be used on younger children, but remember their bodies are not prepared for the high fat content of whole milk.

Juice – Juice is a great option as a hydration source for older children. One serving of apple juice has 100 calories, 100% DV vitamin C and 14g carbohydrates. To extend the supply you have, fill a bottle up with half water and half juice.

Water – H2O. Not too much to say here other than heat and exertion can dehydrate a baby easier than it can you. If baby is having a diarrhea issue, push fluids often to keep the child hydrated.

Snacks – Children are like cattle – they need to graze. Bring plenty of snacks for your age appropriate children. Older children can eat cereal (mine love Chex as asnack), but younger children can have teething biscuits, dissolving snack and other safe alternatives.

Oragel – Teething babies are monsters. Crying, angry monsters. This period could last weeks or months.If you want to any peace during this time carry a tube or Oragel. Oragel is NOT approved by the FDA for use on teething children, but I haven’t found any source of problems. You can use this wonder ointment up to four times a day.

Baby Food – Older children will need (and mostly request) some form of solid food. The most common form is commercial baby food. Home made options do exist and follow the general rules outlined here.

Foods containing meats, fish, poultry or eggs must be refrigerated after opening or discarded. These foods can be kept for up to 24 hours and safetly fed again. Foods that are mainly fruits and vegetable based can be opened and left unrefrigerated up to two days, but must be resealed. Before storing food, check to see if jar recommends refrigeration or disposal. Unopened canned baby food can be stored in a cool, dry place for up to one year (check expiry date).

Bibs – Babies, until around six months, will occasionally spit up some food. This is due to the short length of their throat to their stomach, coupled with the fact that they may not know they are full. After six months, bibs are useful during feeding baby food since that stuff gets everywhere. After 36 months, bibs are only useful for eating ribs or lobster. If this is your case, I am bugging out with you!

Diapers – This is probably the stinkiest subject we are going to discuss. Babies poop and pee. A lot. If you aren’t prepared, well… the **** really will hit the fan. I wont go into benefits of cloth vs disposable diapers, but I suggest everyone carry at least two cloth diapers and come clothes pins/safety pins. If you never use them, then they can serve as towels.

Usage chart by age:

Newborns – 10-14 per day, 30-42 per three day period, 70-98 per week!!!
Infants – 8-10 per day, 14-30 per three day period, 56-70 per week!!!
Toddlers – 5-10 per day, 15-30 per three day period, 35-70 per week!!!

What does this teach us? Plan accordingly and have a backup plan when the **** hits the diaper!

Wet Wipes – Everyone should have a healthy amount of wet wipes in their BOB kit, but if you have children you will need more. Babies are sticky, stinky, slop monsters and need to be cleaned constantly or they will resemble dirty, crusty homeless people in less than an hour. Good for wiping butts, cleaning hands and mouth after eating or playing. Use some on your kids too.

Alcohol Pads – This is a basic part of everyone’s first aid kit, but it is also very important to newborns. During this time the umbilical cord is still in a state of decay. Some doctors recommend doing nothing to the nub and letting it fall off. Our doctors recommend keeping it clean and wiping it off after every diaper change. Also great for cleaning scrapes and wounds.

Antibiotic Cream – If your male child is circumcised, you will need to keep an antibiotic cream on the…stub, until it heals. This is usually only for a few days to a week. Just remember to keep everything clean and hygienic down there and you’re boy will be fine.

Clothes – This is really a “duh” item, but it’s important to mention. Keep spare clothes everywhere – your car, your wife’s car, your in-laws homes, in your BOB, in your diaper bag – everywhere. Babies are best off in onesies, but having pairs of pants and cold weather clothes are important, including socks. Make sure to have the right size, and not cast offs from when your child was younger.

Pacifiers – Yet again, another controversial subject. We use them and I highly suggest them. It helps calm young babies, and can be the difference between a screaming, unhappy baby and a quiet, unhappy baby. Carry multiples because they will get lost or dirty.

Snot Sucker – Remember how I said babies were monsters? Technically they are Snot Monsters. If (more like when) your babies get sick or just have a snotty nose, this can be instrumental in helping your child feel a little better. Plus snotty noses really annoy moms.

Vitamins – Yet again, feel free to do this or not. Our doctor has recommended a daily multivitamin fortified with iron. They come in tiny little bottles with an eye dropper and are reported to really help during teething and growth spurts. Ifyour child is not on formula, this is also very important. Two major brands are Tri-Vi-Sol (100% of A, D and C) or Poly-Vi-Sol (normal multivitamin). One squirt a day is all you need.

Infant Acetaminophen– I can’t implore you enough to carry one or two bottles of this. When your child is sick or teething, he will most likely have a light fever. If he is over 100.4F, then you should administer this per instructions. Babies typically run hotter than us, so wait till 100.4F. Follow package instructions. Even though it says infant, it’s good for children up to 36 months. Many brands and flavors.

Baby-safe bug repellant – Like most things, babies cannot use adult strength items, and that goes doubly for bug repellant. Off makes a special, baby-safe wipe that comes in pouches. Does wonders with keeping mosquitoes away – and works on adults too!

Sun screen – Depending on how fare your child is, this could be important. Forehead and arms should have extra attention. Reapply often if you are stuck outside for longer than afew hours. Watch for reactions and wash away if they appear.

Baby Bjorn – If you are going to carry a child for a long distance, this is the rig you need(Though I always referred to it as the tactical baby sling). This allows you to carry a child, strapped to your chest. Baby can either face in (for sleeping) or out, and is completely adjustable for baby and parent. Foldable flaps and locks allow you to carry anything from newborn to a 25lb baby. Sorry, they haven’t released a MOLLE version yet…

Toys – This is essential for all ages of children, even newborns. Play for children is like work for adults – it helps to teach them new things and can get their mind off their situations. A good suggestion is to carry toys and books around that your child hasn’t seen yet – the newness can really be a great distraction. Also, if you can, get copies of their favorite toy and keep that in there. Chances are you didn’t have time to pack their favorite blanket, toy, bear, etc – but if you have a matching spare, it’s like magic!

Crayons/Chalk – Yet again, a great distraction for young children but also has a dual use of beingable to mark your way. Involve the kids in the marking. It’s very all very Hansel and Gretel.

Books – This goes along with toys and other distractive devices. Pack a few new books and coloring books, preferably books from a $1 store or bargain bin. If your child is old enough to read or at least listen, this will help calm nerves and restore a sense of family balance.

Distraction Device– I am calling this one our separately. If you’re children are older and toys just wont cut it, try out a tablet or DVD player loaded with their favorite shows. Vizios and Kindle Fires can be had for as low as $150 refurbed. Keep asolar charger in your BOB and keep this little item entertaining for days. Pack ear plugs if your child is old enough for them. Makes long, cramped car rides under control.

Blanket/s – Young children don’t need full on sleeping bags yet, and with things like SIDS you want to avoid co-sleeping if you can (not always an option in bug out situations). Blankets can be balled up to make an impromptu, ground level crib or used to cover up older children. If it looks/feels like their baby blanket, you score double points with you kid.

Clippers – Remember how I said babies were Snot Monsters? Actually they are of the genus Clawed Snot Monster. I swear, children’s finger nails grow faster than any known substance. Anyone that has had their face clawed up by a thrashing, grabbing baby knows how important these are. Also keeps the child from tearing their skin up too much.

Shoes and Socks – Very,very important for children able to walk. If you can let a child carry itself rather than you have to carry it, then this will wear you out much less. Keep at least one pair of shoes and SEVERAL sets of socks. Make sure the shoes are the correct size and fit. For socks, always buy one size larger than you need.

Underwear – As diapers are needed for younger children, spare underwear is needed for older children. Carry two or three pair. Wash old ones when you have time. Having a clean pair of underwear, even for a child, fill feel great in a make of what you can situation.

Sleeping Bag – Yay, your child is old enough to sleep by itself without suddenly expiring! Enjoy it. Celebrate with a GI Joe or Barbie sleeping bag. Maybe if you are luck your kid will let you play with it.

Rags, Towels and Old Underwear – This has a variety of uses, from cleaning up spit up and dirty faces to wiping butts. If you run out of diapers you can easily make a new, cloth diaper out of these items. Wash or toss them out if you have those luxuries. Seriously, there are a million uses for these three things…I’m not typing all of them.
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WARNING: This post contains contents known to the state of California to cause high blood pressure, asinine comments and foot in mouth disease in liberal posters. Nanny state discretion is advised.

Last edited by LSUAdman; 03-22-2012 at 19:18.. Reason: Lots and lots of formating issues...
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Old 03-22-2012, 11:23   #2
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Needs per Stage:

Newborn 0-3 months
  • Breast Milk
  • Formula
  • Diapers
  • Diaper Rash Cream
  • Wet Wipes
  • Alcohol Pads
  • Antibiotic Cream
  • Clothes – onesies
  • Pacifiers
  • Snot Sucker
  • Vitamins
  • Infant Tylenol
  • Baby-safe bug repellant
  • Sun screen
  • Baby Bjorn
Infant: 3-11 months

  • Breast Milk
  • Formula
  • Water
  • Diapers
  • Diaper Rash Cream
  • Wet Wipes
  • Clothes
  • Toys
  • Pacifiers
  • Blanket/s
  • Clippers
  • Vitamins
  • Infant Tylenol
  • Baby-safe bug repellant
  • Sun screen
  • Baby Bjorn
Toddler: 12 months – 24 months

  • Formula
  • Milk
  • Juice
  • Water
  • Baby Food
  • Snacks
  • Diapers
  • Wet Wipes
  • Clothes
  • Toys
  • Books
  • Shoes
  • Pacifiers
  • Blanket/s
  • Vitamins
  • Infant Tylenol
  • Baby-safe bug repellant
  • Sun screen
Young Children: 24-36months

  • Food
  • Juice
  • Water
  • Milk
  • Snacks
  • Diapers
  • Underwear
  • Wet Wipes
  • Clothes
  • Toys
  • Books
  • Distraction device – IE: Tablet/DVD
  • Shoes
  • Sleeping bag
  • Vitamins
  • Child-safe bug repellant
  • Sun screen
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WARNING: This post contains contents known to the state of California to cause high blood pressure, asinine comments and foot in mouth disease in liberal posters. Nanny state discretion is advised.

Last edited by LSUAdman; 03-22-2012 at 19:02..
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Old 03-22-2012, 18:41   #3
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Excellent thread.
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Old 03-23-2012, 04:44   #4
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Quote:
Distraction Device– I am calling this one our separately. If you’re children are older and toys just wont cut it, try out a tablet or DVD player loaded with their favorite shows. Vizios and Kindle Fires can be had for as low as $150 refurbed. Keep asolar charger in your BOB and keep this little item entertaining for days. Pack ear plugs if your child is old enough for them. Makes long, cramped car rides under control.
Respectfully, the majority of stuff on that list wouldn't be needed if the SHTF. Anyone who would waste the space and weight, in a bugout bag, to pack a dvd player and a solar charger because they aren't creative enough to find another way to distract a child, might find themselves with a dead family member because they chose a dvd player over food/water/medicine/actual life saving equipment.

With all of the disposable stuff that we use nowadays for babies, I think that people would be AMAZED at what they could get by with if supplies were interrupted. Breasts make milk to feed and hydrate the baby, so long as Mom has enough food and water. Use cloth diapers, and washing them once dirty. Babies don't have to eat "baby food" and can eat normal food mashed up wtih water, like they did for gazillions of years.

If something bad enough to be considered SHTF happened, wasting space and resources to stockpile anything but essentials is a bad move. Survival is about surviving, not being comfortable.

I would focus on storing things that couldn't be improvised, like wipes, medicine, etc. then move onto things that would be nice to have but I could do without, like powdered formula and diapers. A lot of this can be planned for anyway, no reason not to keep 3 months worth of formula (the powdered stuff lasts a long while) and diapers.

Last edited by RatDrall; 03-23-2012 at 04:46..
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Old 03-23-2012, 07:06   #5
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Respectfully, the majority of stuff on that list wouldn't be needed if the SHTF.

Thanks for your comment, RatDrall. This actually points at a fact that I was hoping to address in another thread, but I guess this is as good of a place.

When I wrote this article, I was writing it based on experience and on actual SHTF events - hurricanes, evacuations or something as simple as being disabled far from home. In these cases, the things in the article are warranted - no need to go Lord of the Flies.

What you seem to be confusing this with is some end of the world, Mad Max fantasy. If society as we knew it broke down, ie TEOTWAWKI of course you'd react differently. And you're baby would probably die of fallout, disease, roving bands of zombies or aliens.

Maybe you're article can cover how to protect against those things. I chose to write mine a little more realistic.
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Old 03-23-2012, 07:16   #6
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Originally Posted by RatDrall View Post
Respectfully,...I think that people would be AMAZED at what they could get by with if supplies were interrupted. Breasts make milk to feed and hydrate the baby, so long as Mom has enough food and water. Use cloth diapers, and washing them once dirty. Babies don't have to eat "baby food" and can eat normal food mashed up wtih water, like they did for gazillions of years.

If something bad enough to be considered SHTF happened, wasting space and resources to stockpile anything but essentials is a bad move. Survival is about surviving, not being comfortable.

I would focus on storing things that couldn't be improvised, like wipes, medicine, etc. then move onto things that would be nice to have but I could do without, like powdered formula and diapers. A lot of this can be planned for anyway, no reason not to keep 3 months worth of formula (the powdered stuff lasts a long while) and diapers.
While I agree 100% with the part of your post I bolded, the rest of your post leads me to question if you have children?

Mother's milk is more complicated than you describe. First, women are all shapes and sizes and believe it or not some do not come equipped to provide enough milk. My wife is small and is equally small in all *ahem* areas. She did not have the ability to produce enough milk for either of our children. So we HAD to supplement with formula.

Some women simply cannot provide any milk. Their milk just never "comes in" and the babies go straight to formula.

Baby food - It's not as simple as just mixing water with whatever food you are eating and expect the kid to eat.
My oldest has a severe sensory aversion to virtually all foods. The ONLY foods she would eat for the first 2 years after mother's milk, was Gerber apples and chicken, vanilla ice cream and mayonaise.

You try applying your philosophy to a kid like that. Yes we tried everything short of cramming a burger down her throat...we saw several specailists and lost many a nights sleep over her "condition"

She is 4 now and still only eats about 10 things...almost all of them are white and creamy with a smooth texture.

Cloth Diapers - Have you ever used them?? I have and and I can tell you that you need a lot of water and I mean a lot of water. You also need a lot of time as you need to scrape out the solids, pre soak them, and then run them thru 2 wash cycles. Or I suppose you could try doing them by hand. Good luck with that.

Oh and your house will stink as they pile up unless you seriously think you are going to wash them as they are dirtied...see OP for how many of these things you will go thru.

Stockpiling - is what this thread is about. The OP is listing the items most people need (or think they need) to stockpile if they have children.

Diapers/wipes and formula are the primary items - we buy our diapers/wipes on amazon for about 30% less then you can in the store. When our children were on formula we bought it on e bay for usually 40% less (yes it probably was stolen - orgainzed crime loves baby formula).

I was not happy unless I had 3 months worth for both kids on hand. I can tell you that is a lot of formula and a lot of $$.


That said, that is my story, every one is different so I am curious to know how your approach as worked for you and your family?
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Old 03-23-2012, 08:06   #7
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Stockpiling - is what this thread is about. The OP is listing the items most people need (or think they need) to stockpile if they have children.

All very good points, Sebecman, but I wanted to call this point out.

I know that when I first became a parent, I was shocked at what you would go through on just a good, normal day at home. When we were on the road, 500 miles from home and 10 miles between rest stops, suddenly you realize that without water, diapers, wipes, food and some sort of entertainment - you really are in a SHTF scenario.

A child, especially one within the 0-36 month range, doesnt reason. It can't be talked down and you can't explain the situation to it. You can't say, "Honey, we are far from home and have a long way to go - you need to hold your pee until we get somewhere safe." Having to pee or being a little hungry is as bad in a child's mind as an adult being hurt, thats just the way it is. If you can do something to keep them calm, comfortable and safe you and wifey will be happy.

Maybe it's different for other people - but if I need to hunker down or evac due to a natural disaster (and we are getting due for a hurricane soone) it's all about taking care of my kid. That means making sure he has everything he needs for proper life functions AND keeping him clam and comfortable.
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Old 03-23-2012, 08:42   #8
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I don't have kids yet but if watching my sisters and all other women with little kids has taught me anything, it is that ALL WOMEN instinctively have BOBs for their kids! The sheer quantity of stuff they pack into those diaper bags or onto those 4x4 independent suspension snow chain equipped megastrollers tells me that in a SHTF situation the baby is the one person eating well
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Old 03-23-2012, 09:08   #9
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I don't have kids yet but if watching my sisters and all other women with little kids has taught me anything, it is that ALL WOMEN instinctively have BOBs for their kids! The sheer quantity of stuff they pack into those diaper bags or onto those 4x4 independent suspension snow chain equipped megastrollers tells me that in a SHTF situation the baby is the one person eating well

No joke, Jason. I was amazed at what my wife would cram into a diaper bag. We travel with the kid a lot, and she will cram the jeep with everything she can. The weird thing is, we always use the stuff.

It's scary to put numbers to things, like the diaper usage above. Here is another scary thing - baby food usage. My one year old eats three jars three times a day. In a week that is 63 jars at roughly a dollar a piece!

We try to keep several months worth of food stocked for him. Putting the cost into perspective is just shocking to me!

Luckily he is at the age where we can give him some table food. That cuts down on cost a little, thankfully!
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Old 03-23-2012, 09:45   #10
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I haven't read everything but here is what I did and am doing...

We used to have plenty of the breast milk frozen in bags designed specifically for the purpose. Should the power have gone out we would have had a few options...put it outside (winter), run the generator and plug the fridge into it, take the ice out of the freezer and keep it in a cooler, crush a bunch of cold packs/ice packs and put them in the cooler. Unfortunately we only had breast milk for a few months...then came the need for TONS of formula which is a significant chunk of money.

I stock up on the formula we use and keep that with the rest of the preps. We have bottles and about 2 days worth of formula as well as water to mix it in the diaper bag. We also keep lots of formula at relatives homes. Plus it's nothing to grab a sack/box/etc. if we only have a few minutes notice. However, as we are giving him less and less formula I am basically using what we have so I don't get stuck with it. Plus, at this point, he doesn't "need" it to survive as was the case in the past.

Diapers we always have on hand at least a case extra. But to be honest, diapers are not my primary concern. Cloth can be used and rinsed if need be.

Now as he is getting older (11 months on Monday) we can give him other foods (veggies, fruits, meats, breads), however prior to the arrival of his first two teeth everything needed to be pureed. That can be done with kitchen utensils should there be no power, but it's nice not to have to worry about that now that he can chew. All that's needed is a small blade to chop things up. But we still keep a few days worth of Gerber individual meals in the diaper bag.

The diaper bag also has a changing pad in it, blankets, extra clothes, diapers, wipes, pacifier, etc...it really is a BOB for babies.

-Emt1581
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Old 03-23-2012, 10:39   #11
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Now as he is getting older (11 months on Monday) we can give him other foods (veggies, fruits, meats, breads), however prior to the arrival of his first two teeth everything needed to be pureed. That can be done with kitchen utensils should there be no power, but it's nice not to have to worry about that now that he can chew. All that's needed is a small blade to chop things up. But we still keep a few days worth of Gerber individual meals in the diaper bag.

-Emt1581
EMT, congrats on getting to this part! We just hit the 13 month point, and being able to offer real food is great. Ours has totally given up on formula, sticking me with two tubs of Enfamil and a box of Enfamil To Go.

Being a parent means always being prepared, and it sounds like you and your family are good to go!
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Old 03-23-2012, 11:19   #12
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Ours has totally given up on formula, sticking me with two tubs of Enfamil and a box of Enfamil To Go.
The pessimistic prepper in me says hold on to it, as it is extra calories and vitamins that you can easily use yourself if you really had to.

But the realistic prepper in me says sell em on ebay or give them away to a friend or family in need.

When my little ones quit formula we had something like 15 or 18 full sized cans of Good Start. Street value $25 each and about 8 quarts of Enfamil, at $12 each...we sold the GS and gave away the Enfamil.
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Old 03-23-2012, 12:58   #13
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The pessimistic prepper in me says hold on to it, as it is extra calories and vitamins that you can easily use yourself if you really had to.

But the realistic prepper in me says sell em on ebay or give them away to a friend or family in need.

When my little ones quit formula we had something like 15 or 18 full sized cans of Good Start. Street value $25 each and about 8 quarts of Enfamil, at $12 each...we sold the GS and gave away the Enfamil.

I was thinking the same thing. It is still good. My son is very much in a rush to grow up (he let us know when he didnt want the bottle, breast milk, etc) and he openly refuses formula now. My wife on the other hand, she'd drink it - haha.

Definately a good idea on resale. I still am in shock how much those packages cost. The tube with the two refill packs retails for about $38 at Sams, locally. I wont miss buying those!
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Old 03-24-2012, 10:55   #14
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When I wrote this article...
Rereading my post, I see where I came across as over confrontational, which I apologize for. Reading the following posts, it looks like 2 wrongs make a right.

Sorry if I popped your fun balloons by disputing the wisdom of some of your preps.

I'm not even going to address the rest of your response(s), as I realize we are on the internetz and it's not going to get us anywhere.

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Originally Posted by sebecman View Post
While I agree 100% with the part of your post I bolded, the rest of your post leads me to question if you have children?
I do, a healthy 9 year old who is as happy building a castle in the yard with sticks and rocks and pinecones that she found, as she his playing with her overpriced American Girl dolls and other stuff.

Humans have lived for a loooong time without disposable diapers and jars of baby food. They found a way to get by, and so can we in 2012 and on.
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Old 03-24-2012, 14:50   #15
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When the S Hits the Diaper - How to Prep with/for Young Children
I think you are missing some major items and special considerations for children:

1. Inoculations - for a childhood diseases and others e.g. tetanus.

2. Preventative measures - cleanliness - eating, bathroom, accidents (etc. fire, cuts) etc.

3. Medical supplies - due to body weight, diarrhea, fevers etc. can be more deadly then with an adult.

4. Knowledge - what to teach your children in the new environment

5. Supervision - guarding them from predators of all types

6. Psychological & physical needs - regression - under stress some children may regress to a younger age - e.g. if toilet trained may regress to not being trained.

- death of people around them

7. Other
- Large wheeled carriage for when the child is too tired to walk or can not keep up with your speed.

- Larger clothing as the child grows
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Old 03-24-2012, 21:06   #16
LSUAdman
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Originally Posted by RatDrall View Post
Rereading my post, I see where I came across as over confrontational, which I apologize for. Reading the following posts, it looks like 2 wrongs make a right.

Sorry if I popped your fun balloons by disputing the wisdom of some of your preps.

I'm not even going to address the rest of your response(s), as I realize we are on the internetz and it's not going to get us anywhere.
RatDrall, I stated in the very first part of my post that everyone's parenting technique is different. I respect yours as much as you respect mine. But, I am not going to revert to some caveman scheme during a hurricane.

If I can provide my child with running with as much normality as he is used to, I'll do that. You dont want to carry a solar charger (which ironically has a lot more uses than powering a childs toy), awesome.

I dont want to be instigational - and your first sentence gives me hope that you dont either. Let's try to find ways to improve on this list - not poo poo all over it.
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Old 03-24-2012, 21:11   #17
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Originally Posted by Dexters View Post
I think you are missing some major items and special considerations for children:

1. Inoculations - for a childhood diseases and others e.g. tetanus.

2. Preventative measures - cleanliness - eating, bathroom, accidents (etc. fire, cuts) etc.

3. Medical supplies - due to body weight, diarrhea, fevers etc. can be more deadly then with an adult.

4. Knowledge - what to teach your children in the new environment

5. Supervision - guarding them from predators of all types

6. Psychological & physical needs - regression - under stress some children may regress to a younger age - e.g. if toilet trained may regress to not being trained.

- death of people around them

7. Other
- Large wheeled carriage for when the child is too tired to walk or can not keep up with your speed.

- Larger clothing as the child grows

Dexters - Good items. The only issues I can think of are that I dont know how to give an innoculation, nor do I know where to appropriate such items.

Again, this guide was more written for a short term, realistic natural disaster scenario. Not rasing a child in Thunder Dome (even though it would be pretty fun).
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Old 03-25-2012, 05:50   #18
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Dexters - Good items. The only issues I can think of are that I dont know how to give an innoculation, nor do I know where to appropriate such items.
Maybe EMT has some advise about inoculations.

Have you checked who is living near your child?

http://www.familywatchdog.us/search.asp

https://records.txdps.state.tx.us/DP...New/index.aspx

http://www.city-data.com/so/so-Killeen-Texas.html


Something bad happening to someone else's child is a tragedy. Something happening to your child might feel like the Thunder Dome.

Hope for the best - prepare for the worst.
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Old 03-25-2012, 06:33   #19
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WOW my hat comes off for those who have infants and you have to prep for them. I'm just glad my three girls are adults now.
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Old 03-25-2012, 08:25   #20
LSUAdman
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Originally Posted by Dexters View Post
Maybe EMT has some advise about inoculations.

Have you checked who is living near your child?

http://www.familywatchdog.us/search.asp

https://records.txdps.state.tx.us/DP...New/index.aspx

http://www.city-data.com/so/so-Killeen-Texas.html


Something bad happening to someone else's child is a tragedy. Something happening to your child might feel like the Thunder Dome.

Hope for the best - prepare for the worst.

Thanks for these Dexters - I'll check them out tonight.

Edit - 14 offenders and 3 non-mapable offenders within 1 mile. 30+ within 5 miles. Sickos. The sad part is that this isnt a bad area of time!
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