GlockTalk.com
Home Forums Classifieds Blogs Today's Posts Search Social Groups



  
SIGN-UP
Notices

Glock Talk
Welcome To The Glock Talk Forums.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-07-2012, 11:16   #1
XDRoX
Senior Member
 
XDRoX's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: San Diego
Posts: 2,532
Welding advice...

I know nothing except it looks real fun.
I want to be able to weld a dueling tree.
There is a guy on calguns that sells the rounds targets for the dueling tree. The only thing is I have to be able to make the stand. It seems like an easy task but I know nothing about welding.

Like this:
The Okie Corral

I want to be able to make basic welds strong enough to build this thing. They don't have to be pretty or super strong, just strong enough to hold.

What do I need? I want to spend the least amount as possible on a welder that will do this task.

I see they make a bunch of different types.
Arc
Mig
Flux
Spot
Plasma
ect..

Would one of you guys be so helpful to post a link of something that would work for what I need???

Thanks

I'm heading to HF in a little while.
http://www.harborfreight.com/welding.html

Last edited by XDRoX; 10-07-2012 at 11:17..
XDRoX is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2012, 11:26   #2
G17Jake
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 7,135
All I have ever used is a mig welder, and that is what I would buy. I'm sure there are many experienced welders here who can offer advice. I will be watching this thread since I am considering purchasing a welder too.
G17Jake is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2012, 11:47   #3
Hartford
Senior Member
 
Hartford's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Maine
Posts: 958
I find welding to be very enjoyable, and I also do it for a living. Starting out can be very frustrating though. Your best bet would be to find someone who can give you a little demonstration or look over your shoulder.

I prefer stick (smaw) welding over all the others, but it isn't practical for all applications. It would work fine for this, but the wire feed welders will be easier to work with in this application

If you go with a wire feed welder get flux cored wire. Hard wire requires a shielding gas like argon. A shielding gas will make the flux core come out better, but it isn't necessary in all applications.

No matter which application you choose don't get the cheapest machine you can find. If you decide to do more down the road you may be very limited by one of the smaller machines.

Another thing you will want to check is the duty cycle of the machine. Duty cycle is the time the machine can weld for. The wire feeders on the HF website have a duty cycle of 20%. They can weld continuously for two minutes out of ten, and then need a rest. It will stay on, but the machine won't weld longer than two minutes straight. This how I remember the duty cycle being explained in school, but that was a while ago so I might be a little off. Since being out in the field every machine I've used has a 100% duty cycle. Small welds won't really be affected by this. For the application you want 20% duty cycle is fine.

There are others here that will chime in with good advice, and better advice. Good luck, have fun and don't get discouraged by it.

ETA: The more I think about it the 20% duty cycle might also be that it can weld for two straight minutes out of ten, or two minutes of welding out of ten. I hate forgetting this stuff. It bothers me.

ETAII: Where you are just starting out I'm rethinking my advice on which machines. A cheaper one might be better just in case you decide welding really isn't for you. It's a very valuable skill to have though, and I would encourage you to learn if you have the interest.

Most recently I had to put a new axle under my boat trailer. Wanted as clearance between the trailer frame and ground as possible. The new axle was designed to sit on top of the leaf springs, and the spring perches weren't space right. I cut them off got them where I needed and welded them back. A simple job that would have cost me a fair amount of coin at the local fab shop. Did it before lunch myself with no help.

Last edited by Hartford; 10-07-2012 at 12:04..
Hartford is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2012, 11:48   #4
ede
Bama's Friend
 
ede's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: L.A.
Posts: 9,836
For what you'd spend and the results you'd get starting with zero equipment, knowledge and skills you'd be ahead to find a friend/neighbor/coworker that can do it for you. Buy them a case of beer and slip them some cash.
__________________
Team CARVER Custom
GSSF & NRA Life Member
Steel Challenge, USPSA
PM Black Diamond 538 F&AM
Bamatrooper taught Chuck Norris how to shoot.
ede is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2012, 12:00   #5
DanaT
Pharaoh
 
DanaT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: CO & Baden –Württemberg
Posts: 15,827
Blog Entries: 1
I use an Nd:Yag laser.
__________________
Quote:
Twice a week? 14 times a month?
Quote:
2x4=8, not 14.
Many of the truths that we cling to depend on our point of view.

Last edited by DanaT; 10-07-2012 at 12:00..
DanaT is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2012, 12:01   #6
XDRoX
Senior Member
 
XDRoX's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: San Diego
Posts: 2,532
Hartford, would this work for what I want to do?
Is this a tube fed one? Is that what mig mean?
http://www.harborfreight.com/welding...lux-68887.html

Last edited by XDRoX; 10-07-2012 at 12:02..
XDRoX is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2012, 12:05   #7
kiole
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 3,124
Buy the harbor freight mig welder for 99$ and then get their auto darkening welding helmet. You'll be able to make messy but strong welds. The included wire they give you splatters like all hell but it creates strong welds.

http://www.harborfreight.com/wire-we...lux-68887.html

http://www.harborfreight.com/auto-da...ign-67854.html

150-160$ investment and you'll find stuff to do with it around the house. Later if you buy some nicer Lincoln wire the welds will be even nicer. I use that habit freight welder for general crude repair but was able to make a nice license plate bracket for my trike with lot of grinding.

Last edited by kiole; 10-07-2012 at 12:09..
kiole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2012, 12:10   #8
Hartford
Senior Member
 
Hartford's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Maine
Posts: 958
Quote:
Originally Posted by XDRoX View Post
Hartford, would this work for what I want to do?
Is this a tube fed one? Is that what mig mean?
http://www.harborfreight.com/welding...lux-68887.html
That's a wire feed welder, also known as a mig welder. A roll of wire goes inside the machine and fed out through gun by rollers. I don't see why it wouldn't. Looks like it is strictly flux cored wire. That's also fine for your application. Should work. Hope all goes well for you.

If you don't have a hand held grinder you will want one. They come in very handy when learning how to weld.

Last edited by Hartford; 10-07-2012 at 12:16..
Hartford is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2012, 12:12   #9
XDRoX
Senior Member
 
XDRoX's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: San Diego
Posts: 2,532
Quote:
Originally Posted by kylenewman View Post
Buy the harbor freight mig welder for 99$ and then get their auto darkening welding helmet. You'll be able to make messy but strong welds. The included wire they give you splatters like all hell but it creates strong welds.

http://www.harborfreight.com/wire-we...lux-68887.html

http://www.harborfreight.com/auto-da...ign-67854.html

150-160$ investment and you'll find stuff to do with it around the house. Later if you buy some nicer Lincoln wire the welds will be even nicer. I use that habit freight welder for general crude repair but was able to make a nice license plate bracket for my trike with lot of grinding.
This is exactly what I needed to know. Thanks. I assume this will make welds strong enough to build that dueling tree?
XDRoX is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2012, 12:14   #10
XDRoX
Senior Member
 
XDRoX's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: San Diego
Posts: 2,532
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hartford View Post
That's a wire feed welder, also known as a mig welder. A roll of wire goes inside the machine and fed out through gun by rollers. I don't see why it wouldn't. Looks like it is strictly flux cored wire. That's also fine for your application. Should work. Hope all goes well for you.

If you don't have a hand held grinder you will want one. They come in very handy when learning how to weld.
Thank you. I'll post the results.
XDRoX is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2012, 12:22   #11
Rinspeed
JAFO
 
Rinspeed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: NY
Posts: 9,804


A mig welder is what you want but don't waste your money on a 120V one.
__________________
---------------------------------------------------


You run and you run to catch up with the sun but it's sinking, racing around to come up behind you again, the sun is the same in a relative way but you’re older, shorter of breath and one day closer to death…
Rinspeed is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2012, 12:26   #12
kiole
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 3,124
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rinspeed View Post
A mig welder is what you want but don't waste your money on a 120V one.
For what he wants to do it'll be fine. I agree if your planning on doing more a nice Lincoln Hobart or miller 220 machine with gas hookups is a better idea.

Last edited by kiole; 10-07-2012 at 12:26..
kiole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2012, 12:26   #13
Bill Powell
CLM Number F
Cross Member
 
Bill Powell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: dallas, tx
Posts: 8,972
Blog Entries: 23
All I would day is stay away from the little 110 volt wire feed welders. you almost gotta do two passes to weld a car fender. wire feed or stick welder, get a 220 volt welder if you're welding angle and steel pipe
__________________
Stoicism is nothing to get excited about....
Bill Powell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2012, 12:29   #14
kiole
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 3,124
Quote:
Originally Posted by XDRoX View Post
This is exactly what I needed to know. Thanks. I assume this will make welds strong enough to build that dueling tree?
Yes it should be plenty strong, bevel the edges of the metal with a grinder then weld it. You'll get better penetration. Google bevel butt joints.
kiole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2012, 12:35   #15
Adjuster
Senior Member
 
Adjuster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Ft. Lauderdale FL
Posts: 9,895
If you live in a large populated area get your welder off CraigsList. Tons of welding equipment of all types on the list here in the Ft. Lauderdale area.



/
Adjuster is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2012, 15:39   #16
XDRoX
Senior Member
 
XDRoX's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: San Diego
Posts: 2,532
Thanks guys for the advice.

I just got back from HF. I found a coupon for the $150 one for $89.

Questions. I suck. I can't weld two washers together. What's happening is the wire is basically turning to burnt dust and not creating a bead. I've tried adjusting the speed but no luck.

You guys know what I'm doing wrong? I can get the washers to stick together but the break apart very easily and I can't get a nice bead weld.

Thanks
XDRoX is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2012, 15:42   #17
kiole
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 3,124
Quote:
Originally Posted by XDRoX View Post
Thanks guys for the advice.

I just got back from HF. I found a coupon for the $150 one for $89.

Questions. I suck. I can't weld two washers together. What's happening is the wire is basically turning to burnt dust and not creating a bead. I've tried adjusting the speed but no luck.

You guys know what I'm doing wrong? I can get the washers to stick together but the break apart very easily and I can't get a nice bead weld.

Thanks
Probably not getting a good ground try a large piece of metal first a washer isn't a good piece to learn on.

It is possible as I've welded washers to nails with that very welder

Last edited by kiole; 10-07-2012 at 15:46..
kiole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2012, 15:45   #18
XDRoX
Senior Member
 
XDRoX's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: San Diego
Posts: 2,532
Quote:
Originally Posted by kylenewman View Post
Probably not getting a good ground try a large piece of metal first a washer isn't a good piece to learn on.
Thanks, and my washers were pretty rusty as well. I'll go find some good metal.
XDRoX is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2012, 16:54   #19
Hartford
Senior Member
 
Hartford's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Maine
Posts: 958
Quote:
Originally Posted by XDRoX View Post
Thanks, and my washers were pretty rusty as well. I'll go find some good metal.
the cleaner the metal the better. pictures would help critique.
Hartford is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2012, 16:57   #20
Rabid Rabbit
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 4,124
Check out your community college high school adult ed for welding classes. If you don't at least get a welding book or look on line so you can learn some basics about what you're doing, this really isn't common sense kind of stuff. There is a lot to welding, it isn't as simple or easy as it looks. Just remember take lighters, cartridges etc... out of your pocket. We had one guy in my class that kept forgetting, never did figure out why he had rifle rounds during goose season.
Rabid Rabbit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2012, 16:59   #21
Rabid Rabbit
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 4,124
go visit a welding or machining shop for scrap pieces of metal to weld, for a couple of bucks you can get some good practice material.
Rabid Rabbit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2012, 17:05   #22
Resqu2
Senior Member
 
Resqu2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: SouthWest VA
Posts: 4,455
If this all all you ever intend to have welded then really just get a shop to do it for you. Lots of expenses for a one time project.
Resqu2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2012, 17:39   #23
XDRoX
Senior Member
 
XDRoX's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: San Diego
Posts: 2,532
Thanks guys. I got it to weld. It's not pretty but it holds. I'll keep at it until I get better. I do need some scrap metal to practice.
XDRoX is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2012, 18:20   #24
MrsKitty
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: >^..^<
Posts: 47,673
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hartford View Post
I find welding to be very enjoyable, and I also do it for a living. Starting out can be very frustrating though. Your best bet would be to find someone who can give you a little demonstration or look over your shoulder.

I prefer stick (smaw) welding over all the others, but it isn't practical for all applications. It would work fine for this, but the wire feed welders will be easier to work with in this application.
I first learned to weld on a wire welder and I simply sucked with it. Not too long after that, I took a some classes at the college with SMAW and I was beyond amazed at how much easier it was! Of course, my father didn't have much patience when it came to teaching me and having an unlimited supply of rods and plate helped relieve a lot of the stress of working with my father helped...

I find welding to be so relaxing. I tune out everything but working that bead and that little puddle of "fire". That puddle is gorgeous and simply eradicates everything else in the world from my thoughts.

I hate how that I lost access to all my father's stuff when I got married and moved 250 miles away from his tools....
__________________
to cry with a friend is a warm hug..no words need to be spoken... --bob
Woof, Woof!
MrsKitty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2012, 18:25   #25
G23Gen4TX
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 2,152
I was in the same position as the OP but had bigger aspirations. I wanted to build a 21ft boxing ring.

I already had a $99 Harbor Freight mig welder. Obviously it was not enough. I hired a friend of mine and together we built a biding ring in my back yard. We bought a Lincolin stick welder. It was a 240v one and worked great.

After the ring was done I figured it needed an extra three supporting legs to prevent flexing. that's when I used the HF welder. The supports came out great as well.

The HF welder can weld but it is obviously for smaller jobs. I'd say it can definitally handle the task of building a dueling tree.

For sure get an auto darkening mask. It makes such a difference. Also get welding gloves and an apron. Wear long sleeves and work boots because the splatter will go through everything you wear.

Here's my ring after the frame was finished.

The Okie Corral

And with canvas on.

The Okie Corral
G23Gen4TX is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump




All times are GMT -6. The time now is 20:36.



Homepage
FAQ
Forums
Calendar
Advertise
Gallery
GT Wiki
GT Blogs
Social Groups
Classifieds


Users Currently Online: 1,494
469 Members
1,025 Guests

Most users ever online: 2,244
Nov 11, 2013 at 11:42