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Old 12-05-2012, 11:56   #1
Coffee Dog
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Nastier Wound Channel

Howdy Bro: Which wound channel would have both a wider
& nastier wound channel-

Gold Dot 357sig 125gr.jhp@1350fps
or
Corbon 40 caliber 135gr.jhp@1300fps

Are ya still playing with gators in Florida?

Mas thank-you for your keen experience & have a very
Happy Christmas to you.

Semper Fi To My Wife
Mike
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Old 12-05-2012, 18:21   #2
Mas Ayoob
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Avoiding the gators so far, thanks...

135 grain JHP .40 at 1300, I'd be expecting about a 10" wound channel, very wide. 125 grain .357 SIG JHP, I'd be expecting 14-16" of penetration, wound channel not quite so wide. Definite tactical penetration edge for a good bonded bullet in the .357 SIG round.

best,
Mas
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Old 12-05-2012, 18:52   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mas Ayoob View Post
Avoiding the gators so far, thanks...

135 grain JHP .40 at 1300, I'd be expecting about a 10" wound channel, very wide. 125 grain .357 SIG JHP, I'd be expecting 14-16" of penetration, wound channel not quite so wide. Definite tactical penetration edge for a good bonded bullet in the .357 SIG round.

best,
Mas
Thank-you Mas.
Mas-- does'nt the Corbon 135gr. 40 cal. mimic almost identically the wound channel of the .357 magnum
better than the 357 sig 125gr. ?
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Old 12-05-2012, 19:51   #4
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Mike, I found what you're saying to be true. That is, the Cor-Bon 135 grain .40 with the Nosler jacketed HP gave a VERY similar cone of destruction to that produced by the classic 125 grain SJHP .357 at nominal 1450 fps velocity.

While the paper ballistics of 125 grain SJHP .357 Mag and 125 grain JHP .357 SIG were very close, their profiles in ballistic gelatin were remarkably different, with the SIG being distinctly longer and narrower in its wound profile. I was concerned about overpenetration with it, for one thing. I also saw case neck separations occasionally with the bottleneck case of the .357 SIG in some brands. While this was not mechanically catastrophic ( that is, it didn't blow up the guns), it was tactically potentially catastrophic because you had to field strip the gun and laboriously get the torn brass collar out of the chamber to get the pistol back up and running again.

Needless to say, the .357 SIG was not, at that time, something I either carried or recommended to my students, for those reasons.

Over time, both of my concerns described above reference the .357 SIG were alleviated. The ammo industry figured out how to solve the case neck separation problem, and with currently produced ammo I just don't think it's a concern anymore. The years saw numerous police agencies involved in numerous shootings, in which .357 SIG performed spectacularly...out of proportion to its paper ballistics. These days, I'm a fan of the 125 grain .357 SIG round. They put opponents down decisively, and the spent bullets are generally found spent in the dorsal side of the perpetrator's body, or in his clothing, or a few feet behind the body on the ground.

Best,
Mas
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Old 12-05-2012, 21:24   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mas Ayoob View Post
Mike, I found what you're saying to be true. That is, the Cor-Bon 135 grain .40 with the Nosler jacketed HP gave a VERY similar cone of destruction to that produced by the classic 125 grain SJHP .357 at nominal 1450 fps velocity.

While the paper ballistics of 125 grain SJHP .357 Mag and 125 grain JHP .357 SIG were very close, their profiles in ballistic gelatin were remarkably different, with the SIG being distinctly longer and narrower in its wound profile. I was concerned about overpenetration with it, for one thing. I also saw case neck separations occasionally with the bottleneck case of the .357 SIG in some brands. While this was not mechanically catastrophic ( that is, it didn't blow up the guns), it was tactically potentially catastrophic because you had to field strip the gun and laboriously get the torn brass collar out of the chamber to get the pistol back up and running again.

Needless to say, the .357 SIG was not, at that time, something I either carried or recommended to my students, for those reasons.

Over time, both of my concerns described above reference the .357 SIG were alleviated. The ammo industry figured out how to solve the case neck separation problem, and with currently produced ammo I just don't think it's a concern anymore. The years saw numerous police agencies involved in numerous shootings, in which .357 SIG performed spectacularly...out of proportion to its paper ballistics. These days, I'm a fan of the 125 grain .357 SIG round. They put opponents down decisively, and the spent bullets are generally found spent in the dorsal side of the perpetrator's body, or in his clothing, or a few feet behind the body on the ground.

Best,
Mas
Mas-Many thanks to both your insight & experience with the
.357 sig.
Mas, From what experience you have had yourselve or what contact you have had with police Depts.--With which of the two fore-mentioned caliber ammos would I have (however slight)
& with good shot placement the best chance to survive in a potential life threating situation?

Thank-You Mas for your time & attention to my question.
Merry Christmas(I never get tired of saying Merry Christmas).
Mike
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Old 12-06-2012, 04:29   #6
Mas Ayoob
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Mike, it would depend on the perceived threat profile. For "mugger insurance" on a crowded city street, or home or store defense, I would lean toward the 135 grain/1300 fps .40 for its shorter, wider wound track. In a more rural setting, or a situation like police patrol where intermediate barricade penetration is more likely, the .357 SIG would seem more suited.

The beauty of the platform is that interchangeable barrels in .40 S&W and .357 SIG let you tailor your choices to changing needs.

Merry Christmas to you & yours,
Mas
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