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Old 11-24-2003, 23:07   #26
BCarver
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More GSSF TIPS #23-35

Topic hosted by Bobby Carver

Question:
When shooting any of the stages (especially the "Five to Glock"), at what point during recoil do you begin to press the trigger again for the next shot? Do you wait until the sight picture is perfect, or do you begin to press when the sight picture is close?

Response
I will address each question separately.

The first part..."at what point during recoil do you begin to press the trigger again for the next shot?

I follow the basic safety rule of shooting....I don't squeeze the trigger until my target is in front of my sights. At the end of the recoil cycle, when the front sight is realligned, I will release the trigger until the striker is reset. I do not release the trigger the full length of the reset, but only until the striker resets. Controlling your trigger, reducing the amount of finger and trigger movement is important to manage your shots in a consistent manner. "I do not release my trigger to reset it until I'm ready to shoot again. I hold the trigger to the rear after each shot, until I'm ready to shoot the next shot. This method may seem awkward at first but if you practice holding the trigger to the rear and then release it when ready to shoot, you will see improved shot placement.

With ample practice, I have learned how to control my trigger pull so that whenever my target is in my sights, I'm ready to break the trigger or release the striker to fire the round aimed at the target.
Consistent dry firing will train you to control your trigger without releasing the trigger to its initial stage.

The second part..."Do you wait until the sight picture is perfect, or do you begin to press when the sight picture is close?"

I wait until the sight picture is perfect. If I can't see the correct target or sight alignment, I hold the trigger until the sights are aligned correctly or I can see my target correctly. Under no circumstances should you "anticipate" your target.....wait until its visible and you feel that you are going to hit your target.

The next time that you practice, hold the trigger to the rear after the first shot, when the sights are realigned and you can see the target and sight picture clearly, release the trigger until it resets, then pull straight back for your second shot, THEN move your shoulders and handgun to the next target, THEN release the trigger to a reset and when the sights are aligned, pull the trigger straight back, etc.

If you have questions, please feel free to contact me. Remember, "there's no replacement for practice to improve your shooting skills."
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Old 12-25-2003, 22:42   #27
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More GSSF Tips #24-35

Hosted by Bobby Carver

Question
Practice without a purpose is just wasting time and ammo, right? So, what skills/areas do you practice (low-ready to first shot; splits and transitions; precision/Groups) and how (dry, live, and on a 'straight ahead only' indoor range for those who can't set up stages)?

Response:
You’re correct, “practice without a purpose IS just wasting time and ammo." It’s important to have an objective to achieve each time that you practice. Your objective maybe as simple as getting use to the “feel” of the recoil if you haven’t shot in a very long time. I’m listing below some primary objectives you may wish to accomplish with some of your practices:

• Sight and alignment
• Trigger control
• Stance
• Grip

Now these objectives look familiar don’t they? They are 4 of the most important basic objectives of accurate shooting. Now, some more advanced objectives you may wish to achieve, using all of the above:

• Double tap shots at 5 yards, 10 yards, 15 yards, 20 yards and 25 yards, measuring the accuracy of the “second” shot
• First shot accuracy and speed
• Transitions from target 1 to target 2, measuring the time from the last shot on target 1 to the first shot on target 2.
• Plate shooting, putting emphasis on the 2’nd shot or 3’rd or 4’th or 5’th or 6’th.
• 5 to Glock
• Glock M

It’s important to have an objective whenever you practice with live ammo at a range, indoor or outside, but you can also modify these objectives by developing objectives from “dry firing” indoors or outside. “Dry firing” objectives could be:
• Trigger control by watching the front sight to make sure that it does not move when you squeeze the trigger and the striker falls
• Using the “par time” option on your timer, setting it to 1.0 seconds or less, practice achieving your first shot by dry firing from the low ready position
• Transition practicing by setting your timer on “par time” at ,50 or less. Have two sighting spots on your wall and begin aiming at the first spot, when the first “beep” is heard, transition or swing to the second spot and squeeze the trigger BEFORE the second beep. (Notice what happens to your front sight when you squeeze the trigger) Make adjustments to the par time as required.

So, what skills/areas do you practice (low-ready to first shot; splits and transitions; precision/Groups)

The objective of my practices depends upon the area I need to improve. I believe that you need to analyze your shooting, breaking it down into first shots, splits, transitions and groups. These 4 areas of technique require different practice skills to improve. I will shoot through each match, 5 to Glock, Glock M and the plates a few times, analyzing these 4 segments of my technique. For example, I will shoot the 5 to Glock and will microanalyze each shot on the timer. If you have EXCEL, email me for a worksheet to be used for analyzing your shots.

After you have recorded your times from the timer, calculate your Splits and Transitions, then record the score with a description of the area where your hits were. Once you have developed this chart for each run, then decide what you need to work on. From this example, I would want to focus upon using more time on my second transition and third split to improve my hits on the 3’rd target, so I may choose to focus upon shooting targets at that distance more than trying to shoot all of the targets. I would focus upon improving my groups and accuracy by slowing down. (This is just an example)

Once you have analyzed the results of your shooting, then choose the area or areas that you need to focus upon for that practice session or for the “next” practice session. If you are planning your practice sessions, also plan how much time you plan to practice and how many rounds you will need to achieve your objective. Avoid trying to achieve more objectives than you have ammo and time to complete. This will set you up for failure and will frustrate you when you feel like you need more work and you are either out of time or ammo or both.

…..and how (dry, live, and on a 'straight ahead only' indoor range for those who can't set up stages)?

I suggest that you try to accomplish as many objectives from your analysis from “dry firing” that’s possible. Why? Well, it’s cheap and you can do it at home or at the range, depending upon your time or choice.

If you are practicing at an “indoor range” that has shooting lanes, you will need to be creative to accomplish your objectives. After analyzing the segment of your shooting that needs more work, plan how you can practice that segment at that range. For example:

If you are wanting to practice on transitions when shooting the Glock M and you have found that the targets that you score worse on are the 20 yard targets, position your target “heads on” at 20 yards and practice, at the sound of the beep of your timer, “shadow shooting” the first target the steel and then shoot the paper target at 20 yards with two shots. Then try it from the other direction, left to right or right to left.

I do some practice at an indoor range and the owner will allow me to use multiple shooting lanes, when he is not busy. I will station myself in the center lane and will send a target downrange from two other lanes and practice the 20 yard targets just like I would see them in a full scale setup. This is possible when shooting the 5 to Glock by putting the target “straight ahead” at 25 yards, then the lane to the right of you, position a target at 20 yards and the lane to the left of your lane, position a target at 15 yards. (As we all know, these are the most difficult). You may even ask the range’s owner when his business is the slowest and ask him if you could setup up multiple targets to practice during those times. I have found that most range owners will work with you. Remember, they are in business to sell range time and ammo, etc.

I hope that these “tips” have addressed your inquiries. In summary, analyze the area that you feel that you need to work on and focus upon that using the amount of time, ammo and setup possible. If you have questions, please feel free to email me at carvermounts@msn.com.
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"Home of the CARVER Mount"
www.bb-enterprise.biz
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Old 04-02-2004, 19:41   #28
BCarver
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GSSF Tip #25-#35

There are only 10 more tips to complete our GSSF Tips report that remain address. For the course of the next few weeks, these will be completed so that the original 35 questions by GSSF competitors will be responded to.

Topic #25 hosted by Bobby Carver
How do you handle a malfunction? Do you ask for a re-shoot immediately (assuming factory ammo)?

Response
GSSF warranties the dependability of all "stock" Glock handguns by providing a reshoot of any GSSF stage where a jam or failure to fire occurred as long as the competitor is using factory ammunition. The exception to this rule is applied if the competitor is using a modified or customized Glock in the Unlimited Class. Since the handgun has been modified, Glock cannot warranty the functioning of their handgun so the "reshoot" rule does not apply. If you are shooting a Glock with the allowed modifications to maintain the status of a "stock" Glock, according the rule book, in the Unlimited and are using factory ammunition, you would qualify for a reshoot if a jam or failure to fire occurs.

In most cases, you will be allowed to reshoot each string up to and including the string of fire where the jam or FTF (Failure to Fire) occurred. An exception to this statement would be the plates. If you had already shot 3 strings and your jam or FTF occurred on the 4'th string, you would be allowed to refire the 4'th string.

Now that we have cleared the air on what is allowed for a reshoot and why, I'll address the questions:

A. How do you handle a malfunction?

I'm going to address this question in two parts:
A. GSSF Competition
B. NonGSSF Competition

GSSF Competition
If I'm using factory ammo and a "stock status" Glock:

1. With my Glock pointed downrange, I drop my magazine, clear the jam or unfired round and lock my slide back, laying the Glock on the table or shelf in front of me.
2. With my Glock laying on the shelf or table, I turn to the RO and explain that I am shooting factory ammunition and wait for them to declare my handgun as "safe".
3. I then ask the RO if I can reshoot.
4. If the jam or malfunction appears to be more than "bad ammo", I ask the RO for my score sheet and request for them to sign off that I had a jam, etc. and mark Reshoot on the sheet, signing it.
5. I would then proceed to the Armorer for them to check out my Glock before reshooting.

If I'm using handloaded ammo and/or a "nonstock status" Glock:

1. With my Glock pointed downrange, I drop my magazine, clear the jam or unfired round and reseat the same magazine or a spare loaded magazine.
2. Assume shooting the target or targets that I failed to engage prior to the malfunction.

NonGSSF Competition

1. With my Glock pointed downrange, I drop my magazine, clear the jam or unfired round and reseat the same magazine or a spare loaded magazine.
2. Assume shooting the target or targets that I failed to engage prior to the malfunction.

Please note: Since I shoot all handloaded ammunition, I always leave at least one "extra" loaded magazine on the table or shelf in front of me for reloads should I have a malfunction, etc.

B. Do you ask for a re-shoot immediately (assuming factory ammo)?
Yes, if I'm using a "stock status" Glock.

Please remember that most R.O.'s that are serving our needs and pleasures at a GSSF match are volunteers and some have had no prior experience in R.O.'ing and may not remember the part of orientation where Chris, Scott or Dave explained that reshoots are allowed for malfunctions or misfires of "factory ammo". If the R.O. says that that's not allowed, just explain they are or show them your Glock Report or ask for your score sheet and take it to the Match Director (Chris, Scott or Dave) and explain the question. Disputing the R.O.'s declaration will not solve your issue but "raise your blood pressure".

Whenever a malfunction or misfire occurs during any shooting competition, remember the first Priority at hand is keeping your muzzle pointed downrange in a SAFE state and the second thing to remember is handling the handgun SAFELY to avoid any harm to you, your R.O. or other competitors.

Check back soon for more GSSF Tips and "shoot safely" while having fun.

Thank you,
Bobby Carver
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Old 05-29-2005, 21:25   #29
BCarver
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GSSF Tip #26-35

In an effort to complete the GSSF Tips section, a new tip is being provided.

GSSF tip #26 hosted by Bobby Carver

What's the best method to use for the "new" GSSF start position?

I have received many emails from GSSF competitors asking me this question. In an effort to summarize some of the tips that I have shared with others, I'll list what I believe are the some important principles to consider using the new start position.

The new start position is defined as, "firearm held in hands with muzzle pointed into berm, no higher than parallel to the ground or lower with the competitor's elbows touching rib cage."

The former starting position, with firearm lowered at a 45 degree angle, allowed the shooter to lock in their shooting arm and shoulders so that whenever you were given the start signal, you could easily raise the muzzle and you were locked into the your shooting position. The "new" start position may not allow you to lock in until you have extended your arms and locked in your elbow. I recommend the following:

1. When you are given the command to "take a sight picture with an unloaded weapon", take that opportunity to position your feet and using the "new" start position, push the firearm toward the first target that you will shoot and then swing to the last target. If you feel that you are strained, reposition your feet to allow a stable shooting position on the last target.

2. Make sure that your grip is stable and that your trigger finger is outside the trigger bar with easy access to the trigger as soon as you are given the start signal and your firearm is on target.

3. Look at the target, where you want to shoot and remain looking at that spot on the target, while you are resuming your start position.

4. Since you can hold the firearm muzzle parallel to the ground, you may find that position will allow you to smoothly push your elbows from your side forward to the first target.

You may find that the "new" start position is a smoother more consistent start method than previously used. After some practice and "muscle memory", you will successfully execute a quick and accurate first shot.

I'll look forward to seein you on the range,
Bobby Carver
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Old 10-11-2007, 19:00   #30
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Updated 10/11/07 to hopefully prevent data loss.
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