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Old 02-24-2013, 18:29   #51
cfrye11
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Here is my advise . Get out of the range. Find a place where its safe and legal to shoot and you can have some fun.

Shoot some cans and other random targets . Fill them with water and letter rip. Try finding another lady for her to shoot with.

I find the range alone can make you nervous .

molan labe
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Old 02-24-2013, 19:00   #52
Tom D
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Originally Posted by cfrye11 View Post
Here is my advise . Get out of the range. Find a place where its safe and legal to shoot and you can have some fun.

Shoot some cans and other random targets . Fill them with water and letter rip. Try finding another lady for her to shoot with.

I find the range alone can make you nervous .

molan labe
Yes great advice Ive dont like the range atmosphere everyone there want to help.
Get out with your hubby or a girl friend is a great idea and "kick the can down the road" it gets your head right. Lose the range if at all possible. You relax and have fun and concentrate on the tight grip.
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Old 02-24-2013, 20:20   #53
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Tom - thanks for the advice and the link. As far as "Getting out" well that is not possible as I live the People's Republic of New Jersey where if you fire a gun outside of a range you get the death penalty - twice :(
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Old 02-24-2013, 21:08   #54
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I found this discussion very interesting as I too am a very new shooter. I am having some of the same problems as your wife. I know it is an anticipation thing that is causing me to tighten my grip and flinch. Not exactly sure how to overcome this. When I dry fire my G22 my sights don't budge at all. I can do it just about all day with a .22 case sitting on top of the front sight - it never falls. I even went out and bought a laser training pistol to use around the house for practice. I can shot down the length of a long hallway all the way across the living room and the laser makes a nice clean dot on the wall with little if any movement. But when I go out to the range the flinch is there.

I have been working on trying to pull the trigger very very slowly and that helps some as I am less sure when it will go bang. I have a 9mm conversion barrel (just got) that I am going to try this week as maybe I will be less apprehensive with it than the .40cal. I have very little problems with a .22cal, its just the bigger stuff that is haunting me right now. Any other suggestions will be greatly appreciated.
You have started to find the solution, for you, and for the OP's wife. It is called a "surprise break."

You don't want to know when the gun will fire. Point down range, align the sights, focus on the front sight, reducing movement of the whole sight picture, but mentally accepting that it will wobble around some. One half of your brain concentrates on keeping the sights aligned and on target.

The other half of your brain separately begins a slow, very slow, 30 seconds slow, steady trigger pull, like a train moving down the railroad tracks steady, but as slow as you can move it. With the Glock trigger, the spongy pressure builds but you keep pulling that trigger slowly. Eventually, but you don't know when, the gun goes BOOM!

Relax after that shot, perhaps hold the gun down pointing at a 45 degree angle, at the ground well in front of your feet, breathe, count in and out to 10, raise the gun up and align the sights and shoot again, just as slowly. I don't want you to know when the gun is going to fire. If you start to know, then slow the process down even more.

If you don't know when the gun is going to fire, then you won't be flinching. Trust me that eventually, weeks, months later, this process can be sped up to amazing speeds. When I shoot IDPA, a rapid timed competition, I'm still using a surprise break even though it may seem that I'm shooting rapid fire. This is especially true for those headshot scenarios.

Once you have learned the surprise break, then you test yourself every so often at the range with the dummy chamber drill. Easiest to do with a revolver where you leave one cylinder empty, but load the others, and turn it without looking then close and take those nice slow target shots. BOOM, BOOM, click. When it went "click" did the sights suddenly move off target? If they did you will feel like a fool and realize you flinched for no reason. Go back to a very slow trigger pull and repeat the drill, slowly, again. When the gun went "click" this time, did the sights go off target?

You can use a snapcap (dummy round) in a magazine to do the above dummy chamber drill with a semi-auto. Same procedure, but might help to have someone else load the mag for you. Also helps to have someone safely behind you video your shooting, so you can see later howuch the gun moves when you "click"

In my opinion, while dryfire practise, and grip and stance technique are all important, they are no substitute for the above combination of surprise break followed by occassional dummy chamber testing. Oh, by all means, go ahead and double up on ear plugs and ear muffs, to keep the noise out of the equation

Part of the surprise break may entail also learning to mentally accept the recoil. Hard to teach over the internet, but let the recoil happen. The gun is going to go BOOM and there will be muzzle blast and the barrel will rise up into the air. We know these things will happen. Let them happen. Accept them, in a Zen kind of moment just let it happen, don't try to stop it. Eventually, as you advance in your training, you try to control the recoil more so you can get quickly back on target. But for now, just let the recoil go up in the air, as long as you are keeping hold safely and not wacking yourself in the head, let that recoil happen

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Old 03-01-2013, 16:18   #55
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Originally Posted by kirbinster View Post
Tom - thanks for the advice and the link. As far as "Getting out" well that is not possible as I live the People's Republic of New Jersey where if you fire a gun outside of a range you get the death penalty - twice :(
I did a 6 month contract job in Mahwah and fell in love with NJ, the food was to die for, I went fly fishing on the weekends, the people were so nice, I visited a sporting goods store not far from the Hotel mostly to discuss areas to trout fish which finally led to the subject of guns................ What a shame. How could a place so good at pasta be so off their noodle.
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I know my hens are good Republicans, they cackle after they lay their egg. I do have a young pullet that leans a little left. I can tell because of her cackling before she lays her egg.

That will change after a good "roostering".
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Old 03-07-2013, 22:11   #56
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this is probably not good advice but it worked for me i got my new Glock 19 Friday and could not get it to cycle consistently and between the recoil and the flinching i was ready to scrap it all together when my husband had this bright idea to have me put 100 rounds through his 40 cal Hi-Point (which i have have shot several times before but only a clip now and then) and then he handed me the Glock and it was like shooting a 22 compared to his it cycled fine and no flinch

Just a thought...........
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Old 03-08-2013, 14:31   #57
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The reason why I prefer an informal range is that you can interspace bullseye with hard targets like clay pigeon or water filled soda bottles. Shoot at the bullseye target for basic marksmanship refinement then in between those sessions, switch to hard targets for some practical application fun.

Break up the monotony


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Old 06-25-2013, 16:10   #58
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Prepare to CHL by Bluejay9mm

Published on Mar 6, 2012
Becoming a CHLer is a big decision. You don't just get a license one day and walk out packing. There is some planning that needs to be done. I hope this video helps you ladies with that planning process. Practicing around the house is one of the best ways to get started.







Last edited by 4Rules; 06-25-2013 at 16:11..
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Old 07-03-2013, 07:07   #59
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Gotchaglock

I would suggest an investment in one of the .22 cal. conversion kits for her Glock. This will give her practice with the smaller cal. along with the same trigger pull of her 9mm. She will feel the same trigger pull with the conversion and trigger time is always good! She will enjoy the smaller cal. on the same frame size. I would also suggest the ball and dummy exercise. Load her magazines for her, slipping in some dummy rounds with the live rounds. She will not know when the dummies are coming up. I would also suggest setting up a video camera beside her to video tape her reactions. This will show her visually what she is doing wrong. The ball and dummy exercise is also great for stoppage drills teaching her how to fix the malfunction and get back in the fight!
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Old 07-03-2013, 07:07   #60
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I love my Glock pistols, which I have owned for 20 years, and don't mean to blaspheme on this forum. However, you need to get your wife a single/double action pistol (Sig or HK) with decocker. (Forget the pea shooter .22, which will not protect her when you are not around.) This will significantly reduce the force needed to pull the trigger (after cocking & on follow-up shots), which will improve your wife's accuracy and confidence. After shooting different makes and models, my wife, my girlfriend and a female client all preferred my HK P2000SK sub-compact, which is an excellent carry gun that holds 9 rounds of .40 in the mag like a Glock 27.
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Old 07-03-2013, 08:01   #61
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4Rules nailed it and SARDG's 110% right that Women do far better with a woman instruction in a class full of women! PM me and I will give you the name and number of the lady who runs Women on Target, the NRA program for women. If she is not going to be in TX soon I am sure she can refer you to someone. The only other advice I will give is that 99% of the time a Glock has too big a grip for a woman to feel like they can comfortably hold. Take your wife to a range where they have a wide selection of demo/rental guns in 9mm or 380 (preferably outdoors and not a wide selection of Glocks but a wide selection including M&Ps, XDs and Kahrs!!!), do it during off hours so there is no pressure from the throngs of onlookers, and spend the first 45 minutes to an hour just letting her hold the different guns. I would even grab the slides while she is holding each one and move it around. Then let her shoot the one that felt the most stable in her hand. But the first thing I would do is get her into a Women on Target class. Some of the info may be a repeat of what you have taught her but once on the firing line she will feel much more confident and far less pressure.
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Old 07-03-2013, 08:19   #62
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I guess I should have replied to this thread a bit ago and updated you guys. Sorry. Lol

So, we are apparently one of the odd couples where I can actually teach her things, because she did get used to the Glock and enjoys shooting it now. She's been to the range several times by herself and has even taken the Texas CHL course. She took a women only class and was one of the highest scorers in the class for written and shooting proficiency. She's been carrying her Glock daily for about a month now and loves it! She's no sharp shooter, but neither am I and we both can benefit from additional training which we're planning on doing soon. Some practical and tactical training. Should be fun!

Anyway, I thank you all for your advice! You have helped make another woman a confident concealed weapon carrier! :D

Sent from my Nexus 4 using Tapatalk 2

Last edited by audiomechanic; 07-03-2013 at 08:20..
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Old 07-03-2013, 10:22   #63
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I had the same problem myself. I have been shooting since I was 6 years old and now at 66 years, I've had just about every problem in the book. Here is what I think may be a unique solution....
I love shooting my .45 and 44 Magnum, but I have the flinch problem that scatters my shots all over the target. A few years ago, I bought a 500 Magnum. Whoof! That thing kicks like a mule on steroids. Even holding on with both hands, it will rock your world. Well after a cylinder or two of 400 grain loads at 1400 fps, I would switch back to the 44 Magnum. A miracle! No flinch. In fact even the hottest 44 loads felt like shooting a 22 LR after that 500 beast.
No, I'm not recommending dropping $1200 on a cure, but maybe a few hot loads from a .45 ACP or even a 44 Magnum and then dropping back to the 9mm might cure the problem. Hey, it's worth a shot. Right?
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Old 07-03-2013, 13:27   #64
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Congrats on here proficiency and new confidence. Now you should start getting her to come to some competitions. I had a hard time getting my wife started in competition, but now she is a GSSF monster and does steel challenge and USPSA too. It will build her confidence and skill set over time. My wife now travels to numerous states out here in the west to do GSSF and USPSA, lots of work for me doing ammo and armorer duties.

BTW, I think the women's only courses depend on who is teaching them. I know of some that turned into just social gatherings with not much training or shooting done. I also know of some mixed gender courses that were very woman friendly. It all depends on instructor and other people in class. Glad she had a positive experience though.
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Old 07-03-2013, 13:29   #65
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Thanks!

Competitions sound like a great idea! Will definitely look into that.

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Old 07-04-2013, 15:31   #66
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I've seen such a "cure" make a flinch a LOT worse, too. I dumped a 1970's saw handled .44 Contender cause its thumbrest wouldn't let me shoot it left handed, and it was ruining my combat match scores ( 1911, which I shoot right handed.)

Last edited by kussor; 07-05-2013 at 08:58..
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Old 07-09-2013, 01:49   #67
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin98 View Post
I had the same problem myself. I have been shooting since I was 6 years old and now at 66 years, I've had just about every problem in the book. Here is what I think may be a unique solution....
I love shooting my .45 and 44 Magnum, but I have the flinch problem that scatters my shots all over the target. A few years ago, I bought a 500 Magnum. Whoof! That thing kicks like a mule on steroids. Even holding on with both hands, it will rock your world. Well after a cylinder or two of 400 grain loads at 1400 fps, I would switch back to the 44 Magnum. A miracle! No flinch. In fact even the hottest 44 loads felt like shooting a 22 LR after that 500 beast.
No, I'm not recommending dropping $1200 on a cure, but maybe a few hot loads from a .45 ACP or even a 44 Magnum and then dropping back to the 9mm might cure the problem. Hey, it's worth a shot. Right?
Several years ago that exact gun cured my flinch, too.
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