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Old 08-15-2007, 17:09   #1
97guns
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ever pan sear then finish in the oven?

with most all the cooking shows ive seen they ALWAYS pan sear the protein and then finish it off in the oven. it doesnt matter if its beef, pork, chicken, fish, lamb or anything - they always use this method. ive never tried it myself, ive always either baked it all the way or pan fried it all the way. just wondering if the pan then oven method really makes a difference and what would i notice/gain from it. i am a miser at heart and it just doesnt make sense to use the stove and then fire up the oven to finish off a meal, but i am a food conosuer so i would indeed do it if gains were large.
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Old 08-15-2007, 18:02   #2
lethal tupperwa
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last night

I marinated the steak for a day (in the fridge) in a mixture of

Olive Oil, Soy Sauce and fresh Lemon Juice. (in a zip-lock bag with

the air squeezed out it does not take all that much liquid and makes

it easy to flip over-several times while marinating.)


I cooked a 2 inch thick T-bone (birthday)I seared it (on both sides)

in a large stainless steel frying pan. (Cast Iron would also work

well)

Then popped it into a 450 degree oven for 30 minutes. (still in the

oven proof frying pan)

The results were Very good.
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Old 08-15-2007, 21:44   #3
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great way to cook a thick steak if you dont wanna fire up the grill.
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Old 08-15-2007, 22:23   #4
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It's an old restaurant trick. You see it on all these shows because most of the people on the shows have a background in a professional kitchen.

The reason for it is mostly because a restaurant kitchen has the ovens on as well as the "burners" (the gas range) and the broiler all night long. Not only does this method of tossing the pan into the oven help keep the meat/seafood/poultry from getting over-cooked on the outside it also frees up burner space on the range for other orders.

It's not really necessary for most dishes I will admit although I do it for a few things as I am kind of used to it from my youth spent in many a hot restaurant kitchen (sea scallops seared then tossed into my lil' toaster oven to finish at a "calm" pace--usually keeps them tender and moist). Chances are though that you won't find any appreciable taste difference in your protein with this method so don't feel like you are missing something.
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Old 08-17-2007, 12:36   #5
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I made a chicken cordon bleu last month for the SO where the chicken was fried for 3-4 minutes on each side, then finished off in the oven.

I'd have thought it was going to turn out tough, but it didn't. It actually was pretty good.
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Old 08-19-2007, 08:06   #6
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I do it all the time in the winter when I am not grilling. It especially works for thick filets, because you can sear it on the outside and then put it in the oven to finish without over cooking. For filets, I like a very hot oven, about 425 for 5 to 7 minutes. For other items, like chicken breasts, fish, etc., I use a 375 oven.
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Old 08-19-2007, 08:18   #7
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It's great for things that need slow cooking to keep them from getting tough. Like duck, beef or venison.

You get a nice brown on the outside, but slow(er) cook the inside.

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Old 08-24-2007, 23:28   #8
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Filet mignon does very well that way.

I start it in a red-hot cast iron skillet, burner turned to full-high, with a little Kosher salt in the skillet and some cracked pepper on the steak. (This generates lots of smoke, so be ready to remove batteries from smoke alarm.)

After about 2 or 3 minutes per side, to get a good crust, I transfer the steaks to a foil-lined cake pan and slap it in a 450 pre-heated oven (with a pat of butter on top of each steak) until almost done to liking.

Take steaks out and let them rest under foil for 5 minutes.

Restaurant quality steak is the result.

The only trick is to not overcook it.
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Old 09-06-2007, 10:27   #9
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Also the browning of the meat while searing does add a much different flavor profile to the meat, over just roasting in the oven.
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Old 09-09-2007, 14:24   #10
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Brown meat on both sides then bake. It seals in the juices and makes for a great flavor with all that caramelization!

Use a non-stick pan, cast iron, then de-glaze it with a simple Mirepoix.

Mirepoix

Quote:
Basic Mirepoix Recipe

1 c. diced white onion

1/2 c. diced carrot

1/2 c. diced celery

When dicing the separate ingredients, try to make the dices as small and uniform as possible, both because it is aesthetically more pleasing and because the small pieces will cook more uniformly.

So what's the deal? If it's that simple, why is it so important? Well, these three basic ingredients, in this perfect ratio, provide a deep, earthy flavor that gives so many French dishes the recognizable flavor that sets them apart from, say, Italian or Spanish cooking.

* Try stewing a chicken in a slow cooker or Crock Pot with just mirepoix and a sprinkle of Herbes de Provence.

* Use mirepoix to deglaze a pan after cooking pork chops. Pour the mixture over the top of the chops and serve.

* Roast veal bones and mirepoix in an oven until browned, then put the mixture into a stock pot, cover with water, and simmer (not boil!) for an hour. This makes indispensable stock that can be used in many, many dishes.
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Old 09-14-2007, 05:58   #11
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I am a chef and we do it all the time. Works especially well for thick cuts of fish.
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Old 09-14-2007, 08:01   #12
K.C. Dia
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Quote:
Originally posted by Remander
Filet mignon does very well that way.

I start it in a red-hot cast iron skillet, burner turned to full-high, with a little Kosher salt in the skillet and some cracked pepper on the steak. (This generates lots of smoke, so be ready to remove batteries from smoke alarm.)

After about 2 or 3 minutes per side, to get a good crust, I transfer the steaks to a foil-lined cake pan and slap it in a 450 pre-heated oven (with a pat of butter on top of each steak) until almost done to liking.

Take steaks out and let them rest under foil for 5 minutes.

Restaurant quality steak is the result.

The only trick is to not overcook it.
I'm going to try this tonight, i.e., the part about transferring to a foil lined pan. I usually just put the searing pan in the oven but I noticed that the latest issue of Cooks Illustrated suggests this method because it allows you to make a sauce while the filets are in the oven.
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Old 09-14-2007, 09:46   #13
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Quote:
the part about transferring to a foil lined pan. I usually just put the searing pan in the oven
I used to put the skillet in the oven, but the cast iron skillet is so hot (and retains heat so well) that with thicker cuts like a filet the steak is burned on the bottom before the inside is done.

This method lets you get the char/crust where you want it and then stop, letting the inside get done in the oven.

Enjoy!
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Old 09-14-2007, 12:37   #14
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This is the only way I cook a steak anymore. Get the Palm Restaurant cookbook, which has the perfect NY Strip recipe. It'll change your life!
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Old 10-01-2007, 09:22   #15
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Quote:
Originally posted by PMY
This is the only way I cook a steak anymore. Get the Palm Restaurant cookbook, which has the perfect NY Strip recipe. It'll change your life!
Got a link?

Note to self: Stop coming to food forum when starving.
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Old 10-16-2007, 16:04   #16
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Sorry took me so long. Haven't had a chance to stop by in a while. Hope you haven't been starving in the meantime!

http://www.amazon.com/Palm-Restauran...2571286&sr=8-1

Also, give the creamed spinach a try. Its amazing!
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Old 10-22-2007, 13:05   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PMY View Post
This is the only way I cook a steak anymore. Get the Palm Restaurant cookbook, which has the perfect NY Strip recipe. It'll change your life!
A HUGE +1 on that.
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Old 10-26-2007, 23:32   #18
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I use this method on thick cuts of meat, especially pork chops. The chops are seared first to seal in the juices and then baked to completion. Nice and moist throughout.
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